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Collections ( Social Life and Leisure )

1850s and 1860s Hotel and Restaurant Menus

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See 1850s and 1860s Hotel and Restaurant Menus at UHDC.

Bebe Gow Scrapbooks

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Bebe Gow Scrapbooks at UHDC.

DJ Screw Photographs and Memorabilia

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See DJ Screw Photographs and Memorabilia at UHDC.

Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive at UHDC.

HAWK Photographs and Memorabilia

Number of Items: 67 items

This collection provides a window into the life of the late Houston rapper HAWK, a member of DJ Screw’s rap collective the Screwed Up Click (S.U.C.). Publicity photographs depict the style of HAWK and fellow rappers Fat Pat (his brother) and Big Moe, while snapshots capture HAWK, Lil’ Keke, Trae and other S.U.C. members performing or hanging out. Of special note is a handwritten notebook of HAWK’s lyrics in gold on black paper.

HAWK, also known as H.A.W.K. or Big Hawk, was born John Edward Hawkins in Houston on November 15, 1969. In the early nineties he began working with DJ Screw, an underground mixtape DJ who was developing a new style called “chopped and screwed.” Like many others, including his brother before him, HAWK ordered personal mixtapes on which he would rap. Through the popularity of these mixtapes, HAWK became locally famous. In 1998, HAWK, Fat Pat, DJ Screw, and Kay-K formed a group called Dead End Alliance (D.E.A.) and released the album Screwed for Life on Dead End Records.

HAWK released his first solo album, Under H.A.W.K.’s Wings, on Dead End Records in 2000. In 2002, he released his second album, HAWK, on Game Face Entertainment.

On April 9, 2006, HAWK married his longtime girlfriend, Meshah (Henderson) Hawkins. Shortly thereafter, in May 2006, HAWK was shot and killed. His murder remains unsolved. Another album, Endangered Species, was released posthumously on Ghetto Dreams Entertainment in 2007.

HAWK was especially respected as a writer of lyrics. In the pages of his notebook, he worked out the sixteen bars that make up a typical rap verse. Some pages of the notebook show sets of rhyming words that he was considering for a verse. Others capture the activities of HAWK’s everyday life, from phone numbers to scores for dominoes games.

The collection also includes obituaries (memorial service programs) for HAWK and his brother Fat Pat, and photographs of Fat Pat’s burial.

Some of these materials were part of the exhibition, DJ Screw and the Rise of Houston Hip Hop, on view at the M.D. Anderson Library from March 19 through September 21, 2012.

The original materials are available in UH Libraries’ Special Collections in the HAWK Papers.

Harry Walker Photographs

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Harry Walker Photographs at UHDC.

Houston Saengerbund Records

Number of Items: 5 items

The Houston Saengerbund Records contain five bound volumes covering the activities of the organization and related associations from 1874 to 1937. Three of the ledgers contain minutes of various Houston Saengerbund meetings, financial statements, and the occasional printed program. A fourth volume contains similar materials for the Houston German Day Association, and the final volume contains the records, programs, clippings and correspondence of the German Texas Saengerbunds.

The Houston Saengerbund (Singing Society) was founded on Oct. 6, 1883, as an organization through which German immigrants in Houston could join with their countrymen to sing songs in the German language. The Saengerbund was one of a number of all-male singing organizations that formed in the German communities of Texas during the last half of the 19th century. These local groups were united under Der Deutsch-Texanische Saengerbund (the German-Texan Singers' League, or DTSB), a regional organization that held biennial meetings and Saengerfeste (Singing Festivals) in various Texas cities.

The Houston Saengerbund swelled to over 1,000 members before World War One, and in 1913 Houston played host to a particularly elaborate DTSB Saengerfest which featured a full orchestra and world-class opera singers. But during the war years membership fell as Germans became reluctant to draw attention to their nationality.

After the war, membership increased and the group flourished. The Saengerbund bought their first in a series of clubhouses, and introduced new activities such as dancing, children's plays, and beach excursions. The club officially began admitting women as members in 1937 with the formation of the Ladies Auxiliary and the Damenchor (Women's Chorus) a year later.

With the onset of World War II, the Saengerbund members changed the name of the group to "The Houston Singing Society,” stopped their primary activity of singing German songs, and began keeping minutes in English because of their concern about arousing anti-German sentiment. After the war, the club members restored both their German-language singing and their name, but membership declined, partly owing to a drop in German immigration.

The Houston Saengerbund is still in existence more than 100 years after its founding, and the Saengerbund and Damenchor continue to perform at the Saengerfeste of the DTSB, the International Festival, Lights in the Heights, and other public events.

The original materials are available in UH Libraries' Special Collections in the Houston Saengerbund Records.

Source: The History of the Houston Saengerbund (1990), Theodore G. Gish

Houstonian Yearbook Collection

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Houstonian Yearbook Collection at UHDC.

India Illustrated

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See India Illustrated at UHDC.

Janice Rubin Photographs

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Janice Rubin Photographs at UHDC.

Luis Marquez Photographs

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Luis Marquez Photographs at UHDC.

Mrs. Anson Jones Letters

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Mary Smith Jones Letters at UHDC.

Pen & Pixel

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Pen & Pixel at UHDC.

Peter Beste “Houston Rap” Photographs

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Peter Beste "Houston Rap" Photographs at UHDC.

Selections from the Ewing Family Papers

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Selections from the Ewing Family Papers at UHDC.

Shamrock Hotel Collection

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Shamrock Hotel Collection at UHDC.

Sheet Music of Flute and Violin Duets, 1790s-1850s

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Sheet Music of Flute and Violin Duets at UHDC.

University of Houston Campus Life

Number of Items: 295 items

This collection of photographs from the larger UH Photographs Collection highlights campus scenes from throughout the history of the university. The photos of people, events, organizations and campus departments show a diverse range of activities and events, including athletic competitions, classroom gatherings, distinguished guests, and special events and exhibits.

The UH Photographs Collection in the University Archives contains photographs all aspects of the university’s history. Other digital collections from the UH Photographs include University of Houston Buildings and University of Houston People.

The original materials are available in UH Libraries’ Special Collections in the UH Photographs Collection.

University of Houston Frontier Fiesta

Number of Items: 70 items

Featuring images from the heyday of the University of Houston’s annual Frontier Fiesta event, the digital collection captures all the Western-themed revelry surrounding “Fiesta City” in the 1950s. The collection contains more than 50 black and white photographs, 13 programs (1941, 1947, 1949-1959), the contents of a 35-page scrapbook, and one short silent film.

The photographs highlight all aspects of the festivities, from stage performances and students posing in Western costume to parade floats and the wooden structures making up the Wild West town of Fiesta City each year. Programs from the 50s and 60s present the calendar of events and maps of the grounds as well as name event organizers and friends, board of directors, and contest winners. Especially noteworthy are two items: the scrapbook and the silent film. The beautifully crafted cowhide scrapbook was compiled in 1954 and includes 35 pages of colorful illustrations, descriptive narrative, and dozens of photographs of the event. Titled The Great Bank Heist, the black and white silent film depicts an Old West-style bank robbery perpetrated by gunslingers who ride into town on horseback. Complete with title cards in place of dialogue, the two-minute film was recently produced from 1953 Frontier Fiesta footage.

A combination of musical and theatrical performances, cook-offs, carnival booths, and concessions set in a Western frontier-style town, Frontier Fiesta began in 1940 but was almost immediately interrupted by World War II and suspended from 1942-1945. Frontier Fiesta’s second run (from 1946-1959) saw the event grow to its greatest popularity and achieve national acclaim; Life Magazine proclaimed it the “Greatest College Show on Earth.”

The student-run, community-minded festival was revived in 1992. Every year the Frontier Fiesta Association awards 10 scholarships to deserving incoming freshman and current UH students; these scholarships reward both academic achievement and outstanding efforts in community service.

The original materials are available in UH Libraries’ Special Collections in the UH Frontier Fiesta Collection.