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1850s and 1860s Hotel and Restaurant Menus

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See 1850s and 1860s Hotel and Restaurant Menus at UHDC.

Annual Reports from the Hospitality Industry Archives

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Annual Reports from the Hospitality Industry Archives at UHDC.

Architectural Retail Catalog Collection

Number of Items: 48 items

The Architecture Retail Catalog Collection features catalogs and other marketing material for products intrinsic to the built environment.  It is comprised of a diverse array of historic retail brochures, pamphlets, catalogs and even product samples from the William R. Jenkins Architecture & Art Library’s Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room. The collection spans more than 100 years, from advertising for the Rogers Fence Company printed in 1880, to Herman Miller's Action Office System catalog, which features corporate furniture for the business environment of 1985.

Bebe Gow Scrapbooks

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Bebe Gow Scrapbooks at UHDC.

Blanche Espy Chenoweth, Her Life, Her Times

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Selections from the Blanche Espy Chenoweth Papers at UHDC.

Book of Hours, Use of Reims

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Book of Hours, Use of Reims at UHDC.

Burdette Keeland Architectural Drawings & Photographs

Number of Items: 118 items

Burdette Keeland, Jr. was an influential Houston architect who left a legacy as a designer, an educator, and a member of the Houston Planning Commission. At the peak of his practice, from 1950 to 1980, Keeland produced some of the city’s best modernist architectural design. Yet he will also be remembered for his four decades on the faculty of the University of Houston, where he dedicated himself to mentoring the next generation of architects. This digital collection provides a sample of five of his imaginative works, including architectural drawings and renderings, photographs, clippings, and audio interviews.

A 1950 graduate of the University of Houston, Keeland quickly developed a successful architectural practice. As with many architects of the period, his work of the 1950s reflected the influence of Ludwig Mies van der Rohe and Philip Johnson. Keeland’s innovative design for the Fred Winchell Studio and Apartments (with Harwood Taylor, 1953) combined a professional office with rental apartments on a small city lot. Two years later he produced his best-known work, a steel-frame residence for homebuilder W. K. King, featured in the 1955 Meyerland Parade of Homes.

In the 1960s Keeland’s work expressed other trends in architectural design. He interpreted the Brutalist aesthetic in the Essex-Houck Office Building (with Herman F. Goeters, 1962), where his tight grouping of masonry towers gave this small office building a sense of the monumental. In the Williams Beach House of 1967 (with Alan Rice), his crisp, shed-roofed volumes evoked the barnlike structures of California’s iconic Sea Ranch development.

Keeland experimented with new ideas in his own house on Ferndale Street.  In 1976 he transformed a modest 1930s house into an urban retreat for his family.  He made further changes in the 1980s and 1990s, but the rear courtyard received the most attention. He showed his flair for artistic and whimsical details in the over-scaled metal column that supports a second floor overhang; a few feet away a vine-covered spiral staircase offered access to a roof-top office and observation deck.

The original materials are available in UH Libraries’ Special Collections in the Burdette Keeland Architectural Papers.

Captain O.C. McDavid World War II Letters

Number of Items: 242 items

This 238-item digital collection of World War II-era correspondence, dating between 1943 and 1945, focuses on Captain O.C. McDavid’s tour of duty in the Pacific Theatre of war.  These letters consist of his letters to family members and their letters to him.  Many of his letters home are illustrated with cartoons and drawings, thus providing visual interest to Captain McDavid’s descriptions of army life.  

As with much wartime correspondence, censorship of operations and engagements with Axis forces allow only scant details for those interested in the minutiae of South Pacific strategy.  Instead, what emerges in these letters has to do with McDavid’s observations of foreign cultures and how they relate to the struggle for the South Pacific.

After the bombing of Pearl Harbor, McDavid was sent to the South Pacific. During his Army service he was stationed in New Guinea, the Gilbert Islands, a chain of sixteen atolls and coral islands in the South Pacific, and in the Philippines. In New Guinea, Captain McDavid was placed in charge of establishing village governments with local populations and building infrastructure to support sanitation, security, and healthcare, and his duties were similar in his other postings. The locations where Captain McDavid saw service figured directly in the Allied advance to take territory occupied by the Japanese and to gain staging areas for U.S. forces to move forward.

O.C. McDavid, born in Ruth, Mississippi in 1911, began what would become a newspaper career during his high school years by sweeping floors in the print shop at his hometown’s Enterprise Journal.  His responsibilities grew to include running the print shop as well as writing, which resulted in attending high school part-time in order to pursue his newspaper career full time.  He became the city editor and political reporter at the Jackson, Mississippi Daily News.  McDavid joined the National Guard and received his federal induction prior to America’s entry into the war.  Following earlier camp deployments, he was sent, in August 1943, with the 31st “Dixie” Infantry Division, for training at Fort Pickett, Virginia.  The 31st was composed of Guard soldiers from Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida.  Earlier, McDavid had been tapped by his commanding general to edit a weekly camp newspaper, The Dixie, which bore the name of his infantry division.  The 31st left Fort Pickett in March 1944.  Sailing out of Newport (now Newport News), Virginia, the division arrived in New Guinea in late April.

Following the war, McDavid returned to the newspaper business, becoming managing editor, then managing editor emeritus of the Jackson Daily News.  Upon retirement in 1981, he devoted his time to painting and metal sculpture.  McDavid earned the George Ohr Public Service Award, which honors Mississippians who have supported crafts as art.  He died on March 12, 1998, in Jackson, Mississippi.  The following year, the Mississippi Press Association established an annual student journalism conference in his name.

The original materials are available in UH Libraries’ Special Collections in the Captain O.C. McDavid World War II Letters

Carlos (DJ Styles) Garza Drawings and Memorabilia

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Carlos (DJ Styles) Garza Drawings and Memorabilia at UHDC.

City of Houston, Its Development and Evolution

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See City of Houston, Its Development and Evolution at UHDC.

Civil War Letters

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Civil War Letters at UHDC.

DJ Screw Photographs and Memorabilia

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See DJ Screw Photographs and Memorabilia at UHDC.

Daily Cougar

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Daily Cougar at UHDC.

Domestic Crude

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Domestic Crude at UHDC.

Donald Barthelme Sr., Architectural Drawings and Photographs

Number of Items: 24 items

This collection highlights the career of Donald Barthelme (1907–1996), the first Houston architect to gain national prominence in the years after World War II.  These 57 items illustrate his work through pencil sketches, photographs, and the detailed working drawings used to construct his buildings.

Barthelme first gained attention in 1936 as the lead designer for the Hall of State, the principal building of the Texas Centennial Exposition in Dallas. In 1948 he won an award from the American Institute of Architects for Houston’s St. Rose of Lima Catholic Church, applauded for its simple Scandinavian modern forms. Yet he made his reputation with the West Columbia Elementary School of 1951, which won many awards and was published internationally. Its innovative design departed from the traditional practice of placing classrooms along both sides of a long corridor. Instead, Barthelme arranged the building around two large courtyards; classrooms opened to the courts through floor-to-ceiling glass walls. This flooded the rooms with light while providing a sheltered environment for the students. At the main entrance a flamboyant scalloped canopy greeted visitors.

In addition to the St. Rose and West Columbia buildings, the collection includes Barthelme’s own residence. He built this small modernist house for his family about 1939. The original drawings are lost, but he enlarged it slightly a decade later, and the collection preserves his 1949 drawings for this remodeling.

Of particular interest, and rarely seen, are a few of his studies for the Adams Petroleum Center (1954–58), his largest and most ambitious project. The Ada Oil Company, owned by K.S. "Bud" Adams Jr., wanted to develop its large site as an office park. Barthelme planned to build the complex in four phases, beginning with the client’s own building. He spent hundreds of hours studying different designs for the APC tower and preparing a dramatic aerial view. The company later abandoned the scheme and constructed only a modest building without the tower.

Barthelme helped shaped the look of Houston during its postwar boom. Today only the church buildings still stand, but the West Columbia school district has preserved his entrance canopy at the original site of the elementary school.

Several of Barthelme’s children became prominent writers, and the works of his eldest son, Donald Barthelme, Jr., are preserved in the Donald Barthelme Literary Papers.

The original materials are available in the UH Libraries' Special Collections in the Donald Barthelme, Sr. Architectural Papers.

Duke-Peacock Records Publicity Photos and ACA Master Books

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Duke-Peacock Records Publicity Photos and ACA Master Books at UHDC.

Early Texas Documents

Number of Items: 1296 items

This digital collection chronicles the history of Texas from the Spanish Colonial Era through the turn of the 20th century. The bulk of the collection is from the Colonial, Republic, and Early Statehood eras, and in addition to materials broadly documenting the history of Texas, the activities of several prominent Texans and Americans are also documented. The digital collection contains nearly 1300 items.

Included in the collection are papers pertaining to the establishment of Austin’s Colony, including land and legal documents signed by Stephen F. Austin. Sam Houston’s role as President of Texas is extensively documented through correspondence and legal, financial, and land papers. The roles of Anson Jones and Mirabeau Lamar as President of Texas are seen in legal and land paper, and James Morgan’s role as Colonel in the Texas Army is documented through correspondence, legal, and military papers. Finally, Andrew Jackson’s role as President of the United States of America is documented in a letter detailing his decision to not send troops to Texas during the state’s revolution.

Also of interest are slave documents within the collection documenting the sale of slaves as property as well as financial and scrip documents that detail a listing of goods and services purchased by individuals. Other items include illustrations of currency and warrants paid to soldiers for their service.

The original materials are available in UH Libraries’ Special Collections in the Early Texas Documents Collection.

Emilio R. Ypiña Journals

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Emilio R. Ypiña Journals at UHDC.

Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands

Number of Items: 16 items

This collection is comprised of a diverse array of books from the William R. Jenkins Architecture & Art Library’s Rare Books Room. Each one depicts a foreign land in etchings, photography, or sketches. Unlike typical travel literature, these books primarily evoke an exotic, picturesque locale in imagery. Some, like Fontainebleau, le Château: Album Artistique or Besley’s Eighteen Views of Devonshire (stamped Price One Shilling on the cover) are clearly travel souvenirs. Others, like Constantinople and the Scenery of the Seven Churches of Asia Minor, Illustrated, are scholarly works for an audience unlikely to visit the city of their own. The collection also includes an anonymous album of Victorian photographs taken in Edinburgh and inscribed by hand. The collection spans most of the 19th century, beginning with H.W. Williams’ Select Views in Greece, published in 1829.

Facts Forum News, 1955-1956

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Facts Forum News, 1955-1956 at UHDC.

Franco-Prussian War and Paris Commune Caricatures

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Franco-Prussian War and Paris Commune Caricatures at UHDC.

 

Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs at UHDC.

Galveston 1915 Hurricane Photographs

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Galveston 1915 Hurricane Photographs at UHDC.

Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive at UHDC.

HAWK Photographs and Memorabilia

Number of Items: 67 items

This collection provides a window into the life of the late Houston rapper HAWK, a member of DJ Screw’s rap collective the Screwed Up Click (S.U.C.). Publicity photographs depict the style of HAWK and fellow rappers Fat Pat (his brother) and Big Moe, while snapshots capture HAWK, Lil’ Keke, Trae and other S.U.C. members performing or hanging out. Of special note is a handwritten notebook of HAWK’s lyrics in gold on black paper.

HAWK, also known as H.A.W.K. or Big Hawk, was born John Edward Hawkins in Houston on November 15, 1969. In the early nineties he began working with DJ Screw, an underground mixtape DJ who was developing a new style called “chopped and screwed.” Like many others, including his brother before him, HAWK ordered personal mixtapes on which he would rap. Through the popularity of these mixtapes, HAWK became locally famous. In 1998, HAWK, Fat Pat, DJ Screw, and Kay-K formed a group called Dead End Alliance (D.E.A.) and released the album Screwed for Life on Dead End Records.

HAWK released his first solo album, Under H.A.W.K.’s Wings, on Dead End Records in 2000. In 2002, he released his second album, HAWK, on Game Face Entertainment.

On April 9, 2006, HAWK married his longtime girlfriend, Meshah (Henderson) Hawkins. Shortly thereafter, in May 2006, HAWK was shot and killed. His murder remains unsolved. Another album, Endangered Species, was released posthumously on Ghetto Dreams Entertainment in 2007.

HAWK was especially respected as a writer of lyrics. In the pages of his notebook, he worked out the sixteen bars that make up a typical rap verse. Some pages of the notebook show sets of rhyming words that he was considering for a verse. Others capture the activities of HAWK’s everyday life, from phone numbers to scores for dominoes games.

The collection also includes obituaries (memorial service programs) for HAWK and his brother Fat Pat, and photographs of Fat Pat’s burial.

Some of these materials were part of the exhibition, DJ Screw and the Rise of Houston Hip Hop, on view at the M.D. Anderson Library from March 19 through September 21, 2012.

The original materials are available in UH Libraries’ Special Collections in the HAWK Papers.

Harry Walker Photographs

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Harry Walker Photographs at UHDC.

Havana, Cuba, The Summer Land of the World

Number of Items: 23 items

This collection consists of images taken from an early 20th century promotional pamphlet encouraging Americans to visit Havana, Cuba. The color illustrations depict palaces, beaches, parks, boulevards, harbors, and other tourist attractions. All 23 pages of the booklet are represented, including the colorful front and back covers.

Titled Havana, Cuba: The Summer Land of the World, the booklet itself was published sometime in the years 1921-1939, capturing the allure of the island in the pre-Cuban Revolution era. The introduction page extols the many activities that might entice American travelers to visit Havana – especially to escape the “icy gales” of winter – such as sailing, sun bathing, deep sea fishing, golf, tennis, polo, and dancing. While trumpeting the city as a top tourist destination, the introduction also adds historical and contextual information about Havana’s harbor, architecture, commerce, and culture. Americans are assured that passports are not required and that their “personal liberty is unrestricted.” A full transcription of the page is provided beneath the image.

Highlights of the collection include colorful images of the Country Club of Havana, the Presidential Palace, City Hall, La Fuerza Fortress, the Senate Building, and the Malecon, a broad avenue and esplanade curving along the coast. Other images showcase parks, monuments, a tobacco field, and views of the water as both background scenery and a center of recreation and transportation. Titles of the images are taken directly from the booklet.

The original materials are available in UH Libraries’ Special Collections in Havana, Cuba:The Summer Land of the World.

Herman George Eiden Papers

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Herman George Eiden Papers at UHDC.

Hines College of Architecture Posters

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Hines College of Architecture Posters at UHDC.

Historic Houston Photographs

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Historic Houston Photographs at UHDC.

Historic Maps

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Historic Maps at UHDC.

 

Historic Texas Postcards

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Historic Texas Postcards at UHDC.

Houston Earlier Texas Art Group (HETAG) Newsletters

Number of Items: 31 items

The Houston Earlier Texas Art Group (HETAG) was founded in 2002. In conjunction with other organizations -- including CASETA, the Center for the Advancement and Study of Early Texas Art, and TACO, the Texas Art Collectors Organization (Dallas) -- HETAG promotes the preservation, study, and appreciation of Texas visual arts and its history.

Randy Tibbits, one of the founding members of HETAG and its program coordinator, also serves as editor for its newsletter, which began in 2016. The newsletters archived here highlight related exhibitions in the Houston area, research notes on Houston and Texas art history topics, and news and current events for HETAG.

Houston Fire Department

Number of Items: 189 items

Providing a panoramic history of the Houston Fire Department from the late 1800s through the 1980s, the digital collection features images of fire trucks, fire stations, firefighters in action battling blazes, and some of the department’s Fire Chiefs through the decades. The collection contains more than 190 color and black and white photographs.

Among the highlights of the collection is the 96-page Souvenir of Houston, published for the benefit of the Firemen's Relief Fund in 1897. The booklet is an early-day guidebook to the city, complete with photos of downtown streets, buildings, and fire stations in the 1890s; advertisements for local retail, manufacturing, and railroad businesses; and pages of text expounding on the many benefits of life in Houston at that time.

The collection also includes many pictures of groups of firefighters posing with their trucks, helping trace the evolution of firefighting technology over time. The department had about 50 horses to pull its wagons in 1910, but by 1921 all of the horse-drawn fire carriages had been replaced by motorcars and trucks. Action shots, meanwhile, capture firefighters combating infernos at lumber yards, restaurants, apartments, and other buildings.

As Houston grew in size through land annexations, such as that of the Houston Heights in 1918, the fire department incorporated more and more outlying stations. Anchoring the portrait of the city’s fire stations through the years is a pictorial series of 67 fire stations photographed in 1976 – illustrating how big the department had grown from its early days of only a handful of stations in the early 1900s.

The majority of the photos come from the collection of Scott Mellott, a Houston Fire Department retiree who has done extensive research on the department’s history.

The original materials are available in UH Libraries’ Special Collections in the Scott Mellott Houston Fire Department Collection.

Houston Hip Hop Posters

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Houston Hip Hop Posters at UHDC.

Houston Negro Hospital

Number of Items: 951 items

This collection contains the documents of Joseph Cullinan related to the founding and early operation of the Houston Negro Hospital. Cullinan, a Houston businessman, helped start the hospital with a monetary donation to be used in construction of the building. The hospital was the first nonprofit hospital for African Americans in Houston, and these varied documents provide insight into the founding, construction, initial problems, and political and social forces at play during its early years.

In the early 1920s, the need for a new African American hospital became clear to the community and its physicians. Though a group of physicians had established the Union-Jeremiah Hospital to serve the community, they quickly realized the need for something larger. Cullinan, a successful oilman who had founded Texas Company (later Texaco), was impressed with the group’s work and donated $80,000 to the group in 1923.  On June 19, 1926, the building’s cornerstone was dedicated to Cullinan’s deceased son, an Army officer who led African American soldiers during World War I. Cullinan, who made additional donations to the hospital, was consulted and kept informed about hospital business.

The hospital, located in Houston’s Third Ward, opened to patients on May 14, 1927, and provided a place for African American physicians, who were not allowed to admit patients to the African American wards in Houston’s other hospitals, to practice medicine and train students and nurses. It initially operated on an “insurance” system in which individuals and families paid a yearly subscription which entitled them to treatment. The hospital’s early years were difficult, with problems that included a lack of patients and dissension among and between the hospital’s two boards, one African American and one white.

Throughout the 20th century the hospital underwent many changes, including the elimination of the insurance system. In 1961 the hospital was renamed Riverside General Hospital, and in 1984 the building underwent historical renovations. The original hospital building and the School of Nursing building are listed in the National Register of Historic Places, and Riverside General Hospital still operates today, primarily as a substance abuse center.

The original materials are available in UH Libraries’ Special Collections in the Joseph S. Cullinan Papers.

Houston Saengerbund Records

Number of Items: 5 items

The Houston Saengerbund Records contain five bound volumes covering the activities of the organization and related associations from 1874 to 1937. Three of the ledgers contain minutes of various Houston Saengerbund meetings, financial statements, and the occasional printed program. A fourth volume contains similar materials for the Houston German Day Association, and the final volume contains the records, programs, clippings and correspondence of the German Texas Saengerbunds.

The Houston Saengerbund (Singing Society) was founded on Oct. 6, 1883, as an organization through which German immigrants in Houston could join with their countrymen to sing songs in the German language. The Saengerbund was one of a number of all-male singing organizations that formed in the German communities of Texas during the last half of the 19th century. These local groups were united under Der Deutsch-Texanische Saengerbund (the German-Texan Singers' League, or DTSB), a regional organization that held biennial meetings and Saengerfeste (Singing Festivals) in various Texas cities.

The Houston Saengerbund swelled to over 1,000 members before World War One, and in 1913 Houston played host to a particularly elaborate DTSB Saengerfest which featured a full orchestra and world-class opera singers. But during the war years membership fell as Germans became reluctant to draw attention to their nationality.

After the war, membership increased and the group flourished. The Saengerbund bought their first in a series of clubhouses, and introduced new activities such as dancing, children's plays, and beach excursions. The club officially began admitting women as members in 1937 with the formation of the Ladies Auxiliary and the Damenchor (Women's Chorus) a year later.

With the onset of World War II, the Saengerbund members changed the name of the group to "The Houston Singing Society,” stopped their primary activity of singing German songs, and began keeping minutes in English because of their concern about arousing anti-German sentiment. After the war, the club members restored both their German-language singing and their name, but membership declined, partly owing to a drop in German immigration.

The Houston Saengerbund is still in existence more than 100 years after its founding, and the Saengerbund and Damenchor continue to perform at the Saengerfeste of the DTSB, the International Festival, Lights in the Heights, and other public events.

The original materials are available in UH Libraries' Special Collections in the Houston Saengerbund Records.

Source: The History of the Houston Saengerbund (1990), Theodore G. Gish

Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters

Number of Items: 566 items

The Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters collection contains issues of newsletters and similar periodicals from thirteen feminist and lesbian organizations and community groups from Houston, Austin, and other areas of Texas. These publications highlight the political, social, and cultural interests of the various organizations and groups, primarily during the 1970s and 1980s. These groups were concerned with such topics as women’s equality, gay and lesbian rights, and sexual and domestic violence.

Among the specific topics addressed in these publications are the Equal Rights Amendment, Title IX, and a number of local and national elections. Relevant issues and events, such as appearances by popular and sometimes controversial activists and celebrities, equal rights negotiations with businesses, offensive fraternity hijinks, and the portrayal of women in popular culture, are also documented. Some periodicals provide information about networking and social opportunities.

The individual publications contained in this collection include the newsletters of various chapters of the National Organization for Women, the Texas Women’s Political Caucus, and the Houston organization Womynspace. Other Houston-area publications include Pointblank Times and Breakthrough.

The original materials are available in UH Libraries’ Special Collections.

Houston the Magnolia City

Number of Items: 20 items

The Houston Chamber of Commerce and other business entities presented the city of Houston as a center of growth, industry, opportunity, and scenic beauty in the early 20th century, and this digital collection includes several publications detailing these efforts. Complete with the covers and every page of each item, the collection comprises eight individual books and one that spans 12 volumes.

The collection’s titular item, Houston: The Magnolia City, is a 13-page pamphlet published in 1912 that features illustrations of prominent downtown buildings. The 12-volume set titled Art Work of Houston, Texas was intended to provide a pictorial, artistic perspective of the city. Published in 1904, the set contains photographs, illustrations, and textual descriptions of the neighborhoods, residences, and buildings that made up the city of Houston at the time.

Dating from 1891, Souvenir Album of Houston Texas is the oldest book in the collection, and it features more than two dozen black and white illustrations of pre-1900 buildings, including City Hall, the Opera House, the Cotton Exchange, hotels, churches, and private residences. Houston: Where Seventeen Railroads Meet the Sea, published in 1923, was one of the earliest books to contain color photographs of the area.

The longest book in the collection at 101 pages, The City of Houston aims to attract new residents and capital investors by stating a vigorous case for Houston as a bustling center of commerce; the author describes Houston as not only “the Chicago of the Southwest,” but also as “the foremost city of the grandest state of the greatest country on the face of the globe.”

Other titles in the collection include Greater Houston, Texas and the Southwest, Industrial Advantages of Houston, Niels Esperson Building, and The Gulf Building: Thirty-five Floors, One Thousand Offices.

The original materials are available in UH Libraries’ Special Collections.

Houstonian Yearbook Collection

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Houstonian Yearbook Collection at UHDC.

India Illustrated

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See India Illustrated at UHDC.

Israel Shreve Revolutionary War Letters, 1768-1894

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Israel Shreve Revolutionary War Letters, 1768-1894 at UHDC.

Jagdish Mehra Audio Collection

Number of Items: 12 items

Dr. Mehra's research in the history of 20th century physics has produced taped interviews with many famous scientists. The tapes compile discussions on physics, astrophysics, cosmology, quantum mechanics, and quantum physics. Those interviewed include P.A.M. Dirac, W. Heisenberg, Richard Feynman, Julian Schwinger, Willis E. Lamb Jr., Murray Gell-Mann, and numerous other Nobel Laureates and distinguished scientists. Other tapes record speeches by many Nobel Prize winners in physics and the humanities.

Some of Dr. Jagdish Mehra's literary works include The beat of a different drum: the life and science of Richard Feynman, The Historical Development of Quantum Theory, and Einstein, physics and reality.

This digital collection consists of remastered audio tapes, transcripts, and speaker biographies from a small portion of this unique oral history collection. It features speakers from the annual humanities series presented at the Southeastern Massachusetts Technological Institute (now the University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth). 

Speakers include: Margaret Mead (anthropologist), William Slone Coffin (clergyman and activist), Archibald MacLeish (Poet), Gerald Holton (engineer and physicist), Jerome Wiesner (engineer and mathematician), Oscar Handlin (historian), Philip Morrison (physicist).

The original materials are available in UH Libraries’ Special Collections in the Jagdish Mehra Collection.

Janice Rubin Photographs

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Janice Rubin Photographs at UHDC.

John F. Staub Marginalia

Number of Items: 220 items

John F. Staub (1892-1981) practiced architecture in Houston for nearly sixty years and became one of the region's best-known domestic architects. An MIT graduate from Tennessee, he began his architectural career in New York City under residential architect Harrie T. Lindeberg. In 1921, Staub came to Texas to oversee the construction of three Lindeberg houses in Houston. Staub then decided to settle in Houston and would eventually start his own architectural practice in 1923. He quickly became known for his domestic architecture and substantially contributed to the desirable neighborhoods of River Oaks, Broadacres and others. He designed 31 houses in River Oaks alone, thereby helping to establish the architectural flavor of that neighborhood during its first three decades. He is best known for Bayou Bend, which is now a house museum containing the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston's American decorative arts collection. Staub also designed notable non-residential buildings, including the Junior League Building, the original River Oaks Country Club, the Bayou Club, and the original library at the University of Houston (which is now the blue wing of the M.D. Anderson Library). He remains best known for his residential architecture, however.

Staub amassed a collection of books on architectural types, regions and styles, which he referenced when designing his vernacular-styled houses. In the late seventies he made notes in these books in order to assist scholar and architect Howard Barnstone, who was then engaged in writing The Architecture of John F. Staub:  Houston and the South. In these notes, Staub identifies books and images that influenced his own designs. This exhibit allows viewers to compare this marginalia and images from the books with photographs of his finished houses.

Near the end of his life Staub donated his book collection to the University of Houston Libraries. It may be viewed in the Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room of the William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library.

KUHT Highlights

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See KUHT Highlights at UHDC.

Film and video from the KUHT Collection are available in the Audio/Video Repository.

Kenneth Franzheim Collection

Number of Items: 3 items

Significant to the architectural history of Houston was the work of architect Kenneth Franzheim (1890–1959). The Kenneth Franzheim Collection is comprised of photographs and architectural drawings and models of Franzheim’s work. In addition to Houston landmarks such as the Foley’s Building and the Gulf Building, the collection surveys a broad range of works; included are corporate offices, high-rise apartments, theaters, private residences, airport facilities and others. Beyond Houston, the works contained herein were built and/or proposed for a variety of locales within and outside Texas. Represented are Franzheim’s contributions to the architectural landscapes of New York, Boston, Chicago and elsewhere. The collection’s images comprise the collected works of Franzheim as they appear in three self-published volumes: Kenneth Franzheim, Architect, New York City (1940), Drawings and Models of Some of the Recent Work of Kenneth Franzheim, Architect, Together with Sketches of a Few Proposed Buildings (1952ca) and Drawings and Models of Some of the Recent Work of Kenneth Franzheim, Architect, Together with Sketches of a Few Proposed Buildings (1960).

Lt. Robert B. Fulton USS Houston Letters

Number of Items: 47 items

From August 17, 1941 to February 17, 1942, Lt. Robert B. Fulton corresponded regularly with his parents from aboard the heavy cruiser USS Houston (CA-30), which was sunk on February 28, 1942. After the sinking, the USS Houston’s surviving crew members were made prisoners of war. Fulton’s letters home written prior to the sinking make up the heart of this digital collection. It also includes homefront letters and documents, and cards made in a Japanese POW camp during Fulton’s captivity from 1942-1945.

Fulton’s letters home provide insight into the experience of a naval officer on the USS Houston during the build up to war in the Pacific, and during the conflict’s early months. Fulton describes daily activities on the ship, excursions and picnics, and the mounting tension in the area. Censorship prevents him from relaying the whereabouts or engagements of the ship. Equally interesting are the colorful greeting cards he received in POW camp.

Robert B. Fulton was born in Burlington, Vermont. He attended the U.S. Naval Academy from  1928 to 1932. Following his graduation, he served on various cruisers and destroyers. Fulton attended the Naval Postgraduate School and MIT, earning an M.S. in Marine Engineering in 1941. On August 28, 1941 he became Assistant Engineer of the Houston, flagship of the Asiatic Fleet.

Following the bombing of Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941 and the declaration of war on Japan by the United States, the USS Houston became part of the combined American-British-Dutch-Australian force (ABDA). On February 27, 1942, the ABDA fleet caught up with a large Japanese force. During the Battle of the Java Sea, the Japanese sunk the Dutch cruisers H.M. de Ruyter and H.M. Java and three destroyers.

On February 28, 1942, as the Houston and the HMAS Perth, an Australian light cruiser, attempted to leave the Java Sea, they encountered a Japanese force in what became known as the Battle of Sunda Strait. The Perth was sunk by four Japanese torpedoes, and the Houston was sunk shortly after. Of her 1068 crew members, 700 perished. The survivors were taken prisoner by the Japanese, most sent to prison camps in Burma to become slave labor for the Burma-Thai Railway.

Along with other officers, Fulton was sent to a POW Camp in Japan in June 1942 for interrogation. Fulton spent most of the duration of the war in Zentsuji POW Camp in Japan, where conditions were less harsh than those in Burma. He was liberated from Rokuroshi POW Camp in Japan on September 7, 1945.

Following the war, Fulton continued to serve in the U.S. Navy, reaching the rank of Rear Admiral. He has been an active participant in the USS Houston Survivors Association/Next Generations for over 60 years.

The original materials are available in UH Libraries’ Special Collections in the Cruiser Houston Collection.

 

Source: Robert B. Fulton Collection, Veterans History Project, American Folklife Center, The Library of Congress 

Lucian T. Hood Architectural Drawings

Number of Items: 177 items

Through his early drawings, this digital collection captures architect Lucian Hood’s eye for detail and exemplifies his artistry and graphic skills. These drawings, done before architects were aided by AutoCAD and other drafting software, embody the craftsmanship and sense of detail from a bygone era. The hand-drawn pencil drawings include floor plans, interior and exterior elevations, foundations, and plots.

Many of the drawings are from Hood’s early work on residential homes, which are representative of the architectural trends and influences of the early 1960s. These homes, located throughout the Houston neighborhoods of River Oaks, Tanglewood, and Memorial, are highly sought after in the marketplace, and owners are often interested in the original drawings in order to restore the homes to their original specifications.

Hood was a 1952 graduate of the University of Houston who studied under Donald Barthelme. He was one of Houston’s early modernist architects and his work was in great demand for more than 40 years, from the 1950s through the 1990s.

The original materials are available in UH Libraries' Special Collections in the Lucian T. Hood Architectural Collection.

Luis Marquez Photographs

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Luis Marquez Photographs at UHDC.

Marine Bombing Squadron (VMB-613) Photographs

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Marine Bombing Squadron (VMB-613) Photographs at UHDC.

Mary Ellen Ewing vs the Houston School Board

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Selections from the Ewing Family Papers at UHDC.

Mary F. Lopez Papers

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Mary F. Lopez Papers at UHDC.

Medieval Manuscript Leaves and Fragments

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Medieval Manuscript Leaves and Fragments at UHDC.

Mexico Documents Collection

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Mexico Documents Collection at UHDC.

 

Minnie Fisher Cunningham Papers

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Minnie Fisher Cunningham Papers at UHDC.

Moderner Volkskunst Zierat

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Moderner Volkskunst Zierat (Modern Folk Art Ornaments) at UHDC.

Montrose Voice

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Montrose Voice at UHDC.

Mrs. Anson Jones Letters

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Mary Smith Jones Letters at UHDC.

Oral Histories from the Houston History Project

Number of Items: 507 items

The Oral Histories from the Houston History Project digital collection contains more than 500 oral histories from the oral history collection at the University of Houston, a repository supported by the UH Center for Public History and the University Libraries’ Houston History Archives. These oral histories, collected from 1996 to 2012, discuss topics including the Houston Ship Channel, Hurricane Katrina, and energy development. Most of the interviews also include transcripts.

When the Houston History Archives was created, its mission called for an oral history repository to preserve audio files and transcripts of stories describing the growth and development of the Gulf Coast region. Graduate students and faculty document memories of cultural, political, civil rights, and women’s history, building an assemblage of recollections of the city’s past from multiple viewpoints. To support that effort, the UH Oral History Project in the Center for Public History trains history graduate students to research and interview native and relocated Houstonians.

The Offshore Energy History, a collaborative project among several UH professors and other universities, makes up a large segment of the oral history collection. It was conceived to document the growth of oil production and refining along the Gulf Coast before and after World War II. Other intriguing oral histories include interviews with Katrina emergency responders in Houston, a series of discussions with African American generals from the Vietnam era, profiles of members of Houston's Indo-Asian population, and interviews from the Afro-American Physicians project.

Because the UH oral history project is ongoing, additional oral histories will be added to this digital collection in the future.

The original materials are available in UH Libraries’ Special Collections in Oral Histories - Houston History Project.

Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters

Number of Items: 647 items

Joseph Heiser founded the Outdoor Nature Club in 1923, with the aim of strengthening bonds among nature lovers, studying local flora and fauna, and working with local initiatives aimed at civic improvement through beautification. The ornithology group, who produced the Spoonbill newsletter, was the ONC’s most active study group. Although the Texas Gulf Coast region is abundant in birdlife and significant wilderness resources, Texas is rarely known for its environmental stewardship. Articles in the Spoonbill span nearly a century and cover an array of wilderness preservation topics, demonstrating the dedication of Houston and Texas residents to environmental and wildlife issues during the 20th century.

Joseph Heiser, often labeled Houston’s John Muir, was synonymous with the ONC for the first half of the twentieth century and produced a number of the early newsletters. In the 1930s, Heiser, along with other members of the ONC, spearheaded preservation of a wildlife sanctuary on Vingt-et-un Islands in Trinity Bay, where ONC birders discovered one of the largest colonies of nesting roseate spoonbills in America. Working with the National Audubon Society, ONC members proposed to lease the island from the state of Texas and hire a warden. By 1931, the ONC had successfully established the sanctuary, banded the roseate spoonbills, and adopted the spoonbill as their organizational symbol.

For the environmental historian, the Spoonbill and ONC history offer parallels between the evolving ethos of the Sierra Club, established originally as a wilderness recreation group in California, and the ONC, the first wilderness recreation group founded in Texas. The newsletters of the Outdoor Nature Club include several publications: Zephyr (1924-1926), The Bulletin (1931-1937), Trailblazer (1948-1950), and Spoonbill (1952-2007). The original materials are available in UH Libraries’ Special Collections in the Outdoor Nature Club Records.

Pen & Pixel

Number of Items: 0 items

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Peter Beste “Houston Rap” Photographs

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Peter Beste "Houston Rap" Photographs at UHDC.

Photographs from the Leonor Villegas de Magnón Papers

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Photographs from the Leonor Villegas de Magnón Papers at UHDC.

SEM Collection (1914 – 1925)

Number of Items: 4 items

SEM (1863–1934), né Georges Goursat, was a French illustrator and caricaturist who rose to fame during the Belle Époque. The Digital Library’s SEM Collection is comprised of four volumes from the UH Architecture and Art Library’s Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room. Le Vrai & le Faux Chic (1914), White Bottoms (ca. 1920), the self-titled SEM (ca. 1920) and Le Nouveau Monde (1925) affectionately and mercilessly document the Parisian high society of a bygone era, and showcase the wild and whimsical work of SEM.

Scenes from the Middle East

Number of Items: 0 items

These items are now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Sketches in Afghaunistan (1842), by James Atkinson; Lewis's Illustrations of Constantinople (approximately 1837), by John Frederick Lewis; and Sinai and Jerusalem; or, Scenes from Bible Lands (1870), by F.W. Holland, at UHDC.

Selections from the Alonso S. Perales Papers

Number of Items: 71 items

A civil rights lawyer, diplomat, political leader and soldier, Alonso S. Perales (1898-1960) was one of the most influential Mexican Americans of his time. These photographs and documents, highlighting aspects of his life and career, were part of a larger exhibition, In Defense of My People: Alonso S. Perales and the Development of Mexican-American Public Intellectuals, on view at the M.D. Anderson Library from December 8, 2011 through February 29, 2012.

Perales saw himself as a defender of la raza, or race, especially battling charges that Mexicans and Latin Americans were inferior and a social problem. Perales was one of the founders of the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) in 1929 and helped write LULAC’s constitution. He served as the organization’s second president.

An intellectual who firmly believed in the law, Perales wrote about civil rights, religion and racial discrimination, which he argued “had the approval of the majority.” His work included the pamphlet Are We Good Neighbors? and the two-volume set En defense de mi raza. A member of the American Legion and the San Antonio Chamber of Commerce, Perales was also a columnist for La Prensa and other Spanish-language newspapers.

Highlighting the 2010 acquisition of the Alonso S. Perales Papers by the University of Houston Libraries’ Special Collections Department, courtesy of the Perales Family and the Recovering the U.S. Hispanic Literary Heritage Project, scholars presented their research on this trailblazing public intellectual at a day-long conference (January 13, 2012) bearing the same name as the exhibition. These presentations shed light on Perales’ activism and defense of Latinos, including the chronology and history of Mexican American and Latino civil rights movements, the impact of religion on Latinos, the concept of “race,” and individual versus community action to bring about social and political change.

The original materials are available in UH Libraries’ Special Collections in the Alonso S. Perales Papers.

Selections from the Ewing Family Papers

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Selections from the Ewing Family Papers at UHDC.

Selections from the Franzheim Rare Books Room

Number of Items: 82 items

This digital collection presents examples of notable works housed in the University of Houston’s Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room. The room contains approximately 1000 rare and unique books, journals, and pamphlets on fine art and design. Highlights of the collection include portfolios of building types, architectural product catalogs, and first editions of some of the 20th century’s greatest books on art and architecture. The books in the collection date from the mid-16th century to artists’ books published in the 21st century. The Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room is located within the William R. Jenkins Architecture, Design, and Art Library on the first floor of the College of Architecture.

Selections from the Marjorie Randal National Women’s Conference Collection

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Selections from the Marjorie Randal National Women’s Conference Collection at UHDC.

Shamrock Hotel Collection

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Shamrock Hotel Collection at UHDC.

Sheet Music of Flute and Violin Duets, 1790s-1850s

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Sheet Music of Flute and Violin Duets at UHDC.

Ship Channel Collection

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Ship Channel Collection at UHDC.

Ship of Fools Woodcuts

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Ship of Fools Woodcuts at UHDC.

Socialist and Communist Pamphlets

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Socialist and Communist Pamphlets at UHDC.

Student Art Exhibits

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Student Art Exhibits at UHDC.

Texas City 1947 Disaster Photographs

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Texas City 1947 Disaster Photographs at UHDC.

The Astrodome, Eighth Wonder of the World

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See The Astrodome, Eighth Wonder of the World at UHDC.

The Park People Annual Awards Dinner Invitations

Number of Items: 15 items

The Park People hosted Annual Awards Dinners to honor the efforts of organizations and individuals who shared a mission. This collection includes invitations for events held from 1992 to 2005 that reflect the mission championed by The Park People: to preserve and expand green space in Houston. Because the awards event began as a simple affair in 1981 without formal invitations, a summary is included that lists awardees through 1990.

The Park People emerged in 1978 as an organization devoted to advocacy for parks and green space in the Houston area.  Following the environmental protest organizations of the 1960s, The Park People became a model for collaboration and cooperation by inviting government, business interests, non-profit organizations, and private citizens to join the effort to preserve and expand Houston’s green spaces.

The Park People relied on multiple avenues of community outreach to carry their message and expand support, and the awards ceremony became an anticipated avenue of outreach.  An innovation in 1981, the awards event grew into a gala affair welcomed by those who spearheaded community-wide efforts to promote parks and green space.

From the 1992 event that heralded publication of Sarah Emmott’s Memorial Park: A Priceless Legacy to introduction of the Green Tie Affair concept in 1996, these creative invitations reflect not only The Park People’s success but also the spirit of woodsy and easy elegance that characterized the organization.

The original materials are available in UH Libraries’ Special Collections in The Park People Records.

The Southern Conservative

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See The Southern Conservative at UHDC.

Theodor de Bry's America

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Theodor de Bry's America at UHDC.

Topsell's The History of Four-footed Beasts and Serpents Woodcuts

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See Topsell's The History of Four-footed Beasts and Serpents Woodcuts at UHDC.

USS Houston (CA-30) Photographs

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See USS Houston (CA-30) Photographs at UHDC.

USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters

Number of Items: 247 items

The Blue Bonnet was the shipboard newsletter of the USS Houston (CA-30), a World War II-era heavy cruiser named for the city of Houston. The newsletters chronicle events both on and off the ship, providing an insider’s view of the lives and thoughts of the sailors on board. Although not all issues are available, the collection includes nearly 250 multi-page newsletters from 1933-1941, arranged chronologically.

Contents include ship news and general military news, sports updates for the ship’s teams, editorials, notes about the ship’s journeys and whereabouts, humor bits, sea chanteys, poems, and photos of the ship and some of its distinguished passengers, such as President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

Published by the ship’s company, each edition specifically names its reporters and editors, customarily on page two. Interestingly, each edition also states the ship’s location at the time of publication – for example, “Asiatic Station,” “Mare Island Navy Yard, California,” and “At Sea, Hawaiian Area.”

The Houston was sunk in 1942 during the Battle of Sunda Strait, and her surviving crew members were taken as prisoners-of-war. The Blue Bonnet was revived after the war by the USS Houston Survivors Association and Next Generations, and issues from the 2000s may be viewed online at their web site.

The original materials are available in UH Libraries’ Special Collections in the Cruiser Houston Collection.

University of Houston Barbara Karkabi Living Archives Recordings

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the UH Audio/Video Repository! See Barbara Karkabi Living Archives Series.

University of Houston Buildings

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See University of Houston Buildings at UHDC.

University of Houston Campus Life

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See University of Houston Campus Life at UHDC.

University of Houston Frontier Fiesta

Number of Items: 70 items

Featuring images from the heyday of the University of Houston’s annual Frontier Fiesta event, the digital collection captures all the Western-themed revelry surrounding “Fiesta City” in the 1950s. The collection contains more than 50 black and white photographs, 13 programs (1941, 1947, 1949-1959), the contents of a 35-page scrapbook, and one short silent film.

The photographs highlight all aspects of the festivities, from stage performances and students posing in Western costume to parade floats and the wooden structures making up the Wild West town of Fiesta City each year. Programs from the 50s and 60s present the calendar of events and maps of the grounds as well as name event organizers and friends, board of directors, and contest winners. Especially noteworthy are two items: the scrapbook and the silent film. The beautifully crafted cowhide scrapbook was compiled in 1954 and includes 35 pages of colorful illustrations, descriptive narrative, and dozens of photographs of the event. Titled The Great Bank Heist, the black and white silent film depicts an Old West-style bank robbery perpetrated by gunslingers who ride into town on horseback. Complete with title cards in place of dialogue, the two-minute film was recently produced from 1953 Frontier Fiesta footage.

A combination of musical and theatrical performances, cook-offs, carnival booths, and concessions set in a Western frontier-style town, Frontier Fiesta began in 1940 but was almost immediately interrupted by World War II and suspended from 1942-1945. Frontier Fiesta’s second run (from 1946-1959) saw the event grow to its greatest popularity and achieve national acclaim; Life Magazine proclaimed it the “Greatest College Show on Earth.”

The student-run, community-minded festival was revived in 1992. Every year the Frontier Fiesta Association awards 10 scholarships to deserving incoming freshman and current UH students; these scholarships reward both academic achievement and outstanding efforts in community service.

The original materials are available in UH Libraries’ Special Collections in the UH Frontier Fiesta Collection.

University of Houston Integration Records

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See University of Houston Integration Records at UHDC.

 

University of Houston People

Number of Items: 0 items

This collection is now available at the new UH Digital Collections site! See University of Houston People at UHDC.

University of Houston Sports Championship Publications

Number of Items: 39 items

This digital collection captures the excitement of some of the University of Houston’s finest moments in sports. Featuring images from the Championship Publications Series of the Athletic Department Records, the collection consists of playbooks and scorebooks related to University of Houston championship sports teams (1954-1996). Included are approximately forty programs and publications related to the University’s championship football, track and field, golf swimming, volleyball, and basketball teams.

The University of Houston is the home to one of the most storied athletics programs in the nation. The Cougars have won 62 NCAA individual championships and 17 NCAA team titles, been in 21 bowls, appeared in five NCAA Final Fours in men's basketball, and earned a berth to the College World Series.

In addition, UH can boast of more than 899 All-America award winners and 39 Olympic medal winners, including 20 Gold Medals. Cougars have reached elite status in several professional sports- a Master's champion, a NBA MVP, a Cy Young Award winner, and three of the NBA's Top 50 Greatest Players.

The playbooks, programs and scorebooks in this digital collection are excellent resources for statistics.

The original materials are available in UH Libraries’ Special Collections in the Athletics Department Records.

William Slough USS Houston Letters

Number of Items: 30 items

The William Slough USS Houston Letters contain letters sent from William Slough, S1C, to his family from 1934-1936 while he served on the USS Houston (CA-30). The collection also includes copies of Slough’s “Crossing the Line” document and subpoena, a photograph of Slough in his Navy uniform, and one letter from a shipmate to Slough’s family. These letters provide a glimpse into both the day-to-day life and the larger concerns of a sailor in the years before World War II.

William Slough was born on May 19, 1914, in Missouri but later moved to Texas, where he lived before joining the Navy. He started his service on May 15, 1934, just a few days shy of his twentieth birthday. His first letter in this collection, sent to his mother, is dated May 27, 1934. In the letters, Slough talks about spending time in the sick bay, his supplies and equipment, training, and leisure activities. He worries about his family, money, romances from home, promotion, and trouble with officers. He also talks about learning to love travel and his plans for the future, which include a career in the Navy and putting off marriage. Slough married in 1939 and had two children. He died in Victoria, Texas, on Dec. 9, 1991.

During the course of these letters, Slough is a Seaman First Class. In addition to serving on the Houston, a heavy cruiser, he also served on the USS Cowpens (CVL-25), an aircraft carrier. He served in World War II and reached the rank of Chief Warrant Officer, and after the war he continued in the Navy Reserves for 20 years. Slough was proud to say that with his service, every generation of his family had served in the United States military, beginning with Matthias Slough in the Revolutionary War.

The USS Houston was commissioned on June 17, 1930, and became the flagship of the Asiatic Fleet in 1931. In 1933 the Houston left the Asiatic and became part of the Scouting Force, based in Long Beach, California, and most of Slough’s letters originate from California. During the 1930s the Houston also hosted President Franklin D. Roosevelt, an avid fisherman, for four leisure cruises.

The Houston returned to the Asiatic in March 1941, and following the attack on Pearl Harbor served in the Pacific theater as part of a multi-national force. On February 28, 1942, as the Houston and the HMAS Perth, an Australian ship, attempted to leave the Java Sea, they encountered a Japanese force in what became known as the Battle of Sunda Strait. The Houston was struck by torpedoes and began to sink, prompting an order to abandon ship. Seven hundred of the 1068 crew members perished. The surviving crew members were taken prisoner by the Japanese and were held until they learned of the war’s end on August 16, 1945.

The original materials are available in UH Libraries’ Special Collections in the Cruiser Houston Collection.