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Houstonian, 1998
Fall
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Houstonian, 1998 - Fall. 1998. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 21, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/5473/show/5285.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1998). Houstonian, 1998 - Fall. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/5473/show/5285

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houstonian, 1998 - Fall, 1998, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 21, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/5473/show/5285.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian, 1998
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Date 1998
Description This edition of the Houstonian, published by the students of the university in 1998, is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • College yearbooks
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • yearbooks
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location LD2281.H745 H6 v. 64 1998
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1158762~S11
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Fall
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name yearb1998066.jpg
Transcript Reviewing our history Carolyn DePew The Holocaust was such a monumental event that it has provoked reactions not only from survivors and their relatives, but also outside observers. Witness & Legacy: Contemporary Art about the Holocaust, a traveling exhibition that visited the University of Houston Blaffer Gallery in the fall, displayed artwork by Holocaust survivors, children of survivors and outsiders. Many people sympathize with Holocaust survivors because so much is known about the Holocaust said Thuy Tran, public relations coordinator for the gallery. People who survived the Holocaust are very verbal and educated, Tran said. They made it well known about the tragedy. It is an event that is well taught. Thre are certainly artists out there that aren't Jewish, weren't in the Holocaust but were impacted by it. Professor of Holocaust literature Dan Stern said the art done by witnesses and survivors were most significant in the show. Although he himself as a scholar of the Holocaust is an outside observer, Stern said he found most pieces by the outsiders in the show to lack clear meaning. The Holocaust can be made vulgar, elegant, serious or trivialized, Stern said. The artists that especially failed in properly portraying the atrocities were the ones who thought it appropriate to comment on it from a distance ironically. The Holocaust's uniqueness requires that artists stretch their imaginations, Stern said. The tratitional eisal paintings in the show were not as good as those done on other mediums or forms, such as three-dimensional displays. The Holocaust Museum of Houston also housed a portion of the art exhibition, but the purpose of the majority of the content of that museum is to give a historical account of the event, Tran said. The Blaffer Gallery only showed the artwork that came with the traveling eshibition. The artowork is not always a realistic account of the events, Tran said. The artists themselves say that I'm not portraying the Holocaust realistically, Tran said. Videos, documents and photos serve that purpose. We didn't have the documentaries or artifacts. This is very fresh because this is more of a transcending show. Blaffer made the best choice by keeping history out of the art exhibition because history quantifies the Holocaust and would not have been appropriate for an art show, Stern said. Ar is not there to tell you what happened there, Stern said. This is the human reaction to the exterme conditions of the Holocaust. November