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Houstonian, 1998
Fall
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Houstonian, 1998 - Fall. 1998. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 25, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/5473/show/5239.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1998). Houstonian, 1998 - Fall. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/5473/show/5239

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houstonian, 1998 - Fall, 1998, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 25, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/5473/show/5239.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian, 1998
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Date 1998
Description This edition of the Houstonian, published by the students of the university in 1998, is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • College yearbooks
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • yearbooks
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location LD2281.H745 H6 v. 64 1998
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1158762~S11
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Fall
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name yearb1998020.jpg
Transcript O•V•E•R F•L•O•W R•E•S•I•D•E•N•T•S stuck out "You pray that nobody takes your stuff," Chelia Duru While moving in the Moody Towers during the faU, new and returning residents were met with the usual long lines for the elevator, lifting heavy boxes and fighting for carts. However, if adjusting to one new roommate and his or her habits were not enough, many Moody Towers residents had five new roommates to become acquainted with. For approximately two months, all 32 lounges in the North and South Towers did not serve as the quiet relief from a noisy roommate, but rather the temporary living quarters for 110 students. According to Sean Pierce, Moody Towers assistant area coordinator, students having to live in lounges instead of an assigned room was due to a combination of factors. "They could have turned in their agreement in late or didn't pay their deposit on time. Some just showed up and said "Hi, I want to live on campus," Pierce said. Sandy Coltharp, assistant director of Residential Life and Housing, said that in order to avoid any "surprises," students were notified that they would be placed into overflow housing. However, for April Josey, a freshman psychology major, it was a surprise on the first day of check-in, when she was told she would be living in a lounge for two weeks to a month. Josey said she did not know of an application deadline, and while living in the lounge was only temporary, it was still "uncomfortable." "I was upset," Josey said. "It's crowded in here. I wanted to get moved into my room so I could get organized, plus I brought all my stuff and have no room for it." . As a result, Josey temporarily resided in a North Tower lounge with six beds. The physical space is equivalent to two double rooms, but she shared the room with four other females. Clothes, radios and televisions were organized closely around beds. The lounges' eight windows were covered with dark paper. Chelia Duru, a sophomore biology major, said at the time that she refused to change in the room. "This is nothing, just paper," Duru said. "I'd go change in the restroom." The question of safety and trusting five new roommates, each with a key, also concerned Duru. "You pray that nobody takes your stuff. I left my TV with a friend," she said. RLH staff began the process of phoning no-shows and soon about 70 spaces, the equivalent of 35 rooms, opened for residents to move into. Duru and Josey both were given rooms. Josey moved into a room in less than a week after moving in. "It felt good to get into a room. It felt safe, I had privacy and I can sleep better. I feel comfortable now," Josey said. Both Duru and Josey agreed a cut-off of applications accepted could help avoid taking in more students than housing can accommodate. However, Coltharp said a history of having no-shows meant space becomes available within days and then there is no need to turn away students. This is the second year the Towers faced overflow, and Coltharp admits that additional housing may alleviate future problems. "It's something we are talking about and exploring options," Coltharp said. "As soon as the university has enough proof it's a good thing to do, we'll be moving on it. we'll be moving on it." September