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Houstonian, 1989
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Houstonian, 1989 - Issues. 1989. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 21, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/22668/show/22591.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1989). Houstonian, 1989 - Issues. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/22668/show/22591

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houstonian, 1989 - Issues, 1989, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 21, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/22668/show/22591.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian, 1989
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Date 1989
Description This edition of the Houstonian, published by the students of the university in 1989, is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • College yearbooks
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • yearbooks
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location LD2281.H745 H6 v. 55 1989
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1158762~S11
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Issues
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name yearb_1989_267.jpg
Transcript Neighborhood A-Bombs How safe is our Nuclear future Texas has entered the Atomic Age with the completion the South Texas Nuclear Project near Bay City, just 90 miles up wind from Houston. As the first reactor went On-Line, the controversy about the use of nuclear energy as a power source, along with this plants particular problems, fired up. Controversy about Nuclear energy, stems from the distruction and radiation poisoning that resulted after atomic bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The world saw just how dangerous atomic energy is and can be! Nuclear's problems became much more controversial when the Three Mile Island (TMI) Nuclear plant, near Harrisburg, Penn. experienced a core melt down. TMI is much closer to home than either of the Japanese cities and easier to relate to for many people. The questions about the safety of nuclear reactors and their byproducts soon became the "HOTTEST" topic in America. TMI's problem began on March 28, 1979, people down wind of TMI complained of a reddening of the skin and the taste of metal in their mouths. A few hours later General Utilities Nuclear (TMI's operators) announced that their had been a series of accidents at the plant, but that was all they said for some time! Later it was disclosed that a malfunctioning valve had, unnoticed by plant operators, allowed thousands of gallons of coolant to drain, thus exposing the rods. With the loss of coolant the fuel rods began to melt through the lining of the Reaction Room floor, and sank to the floor of the Reactor Vessel. Had the melting proccess continued a serious ex plosion of radio-activity would have occurred, and possibly an external explosion. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission is overseeing the plant clean-up estimated at $1 billion. Yet, their clean-up efforts have added to the controversy surrounding nuclear power'. The NRC's proposal, would allow radioactive water remaining in the reactor core since the accident, to evaporate.This would release highly radioactive tritium into the environment. TMI's lenghty clean up and fight with environmentalists and residents slowed down progress on the South Texas Nuclear Project. A stop work order was 316 ■ Issues