Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Houstonian, 1990
Issues
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houstonian, 1990 - Issues. 1990. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 20, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/21919/show/21655.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1990). Houstonian, 1990 - Issues. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/21919/show/21655

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houstonian, 1990 - Issues, 1990, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 20, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/21919/show/21655.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian, 1990
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Date 1990
Description This edition of the Houstonian, published by the students of the university in 1990, is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • College yearbooks
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • yearbooks
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location LD2281.H745 H6 v. 56 1990
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1158762~S11
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Issues
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name yearb_1990_054.jpg
Transcript Exploring the Stars Glory back as faith in space program returns Red and blue flames shoot from its engines and massive plumes of smoke spread across the Everglades. Another shuttle streaks toward the heavens, and with it, goes America's aspirations of conquering the universe. Since the Challenger disaster in January of 1986, hopes of learning more about space have returned. Still, with the possible threat of another shuttle explosion, people anxiously watch as each post-Challenger launch achieves orbital status. Not since the Apollo moon missions has the American space society moved in such harmonious syn- chronicity. Not since the early days of the space program has a president spoken of a dream to reach out and touch the stars. President George Bush followed in the steps of the late John F. Kennedy when he spoke on national television announcing his plan to land a man on Mars, the red planet. Scientists, however, have said that not enough is known about lengthy space travel, including problems with long-term exposure to weightlessness. It would take nearly three years with present technology to reach Mars and just as long to return. For this reason, Americans have CAPACITY OTCOOOIB: turned their attention to short-term goals. In a sense, a "one step at a time" route will be taken. With our presence being reestablished in space, money and manpower have been allocated to build a space station for geocentric orbit. Along those same lines, construction techniques and exposure tests are being made for a moon base. Each successful launch of another shuttle puts us one step closer to our goal. With each coming day, we add new meaning to the phrase, "To go where no man has gone before." -Allen Manning STEADY NOW-The Space Shuttle Atlantis glides toward a landing on the Mojave Desert after four days in space. MISSION ACCOMPLISHED-The five-man crew who flew aboard Space Shuttle Discovery exit the spacecraft after a successful five-day mission. 58 R|'«"e$ ape