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The Southern Conservative, Vol. 7, No. 9, September 1956
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The Southern Conservative, Vol. 7, No. 9, September 1956 - File 001. 1956-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 25, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/southern/item/937/show/928.

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(1956-09). The Southern Conservative, Vol. 7, No. 9, September 1956 - File 001. The Southern Conservative. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/southern/item/937/show/928

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The Southern Conservative, Vol. 7, No. 9, September 1956 - File 001, 1956-09, The Southern Conservative, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 25, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/southern/item/937/show/928.

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Title The Southern Conservative, Vol. 7, No. 9, September 1956
Contributor
  • Darden, Ida M.
Publisher Southern Conservative
Date September 1956
Language English
Subject
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
Place
  • Fort Worth, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 10604411
Collection
  • Houston Metropolitan Research Center
  • Ida M. Darden Collection
  • The Southern Conservative
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Houston Metropolitan Research Center.
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript THE SOUTHERN CONSERVATIVE -To Plead lor a Return of Constitutional Government- Vol. 7 FORT WORTH, TEXAS, SEPTEMBER. 1956 No.9 Agai-. T ~o Major Parties Go Into uddle and Come Up With Nothing Warren Brand of "Racial Unity" Prevails In . Small Texas Town A fair samPle o! "racial unity" of the Earl Warren variety has prevailed at a small Texas town, Mansfield, near Fort Worth fQJ' several days, where mobs have been gathered each day, 11 Negroes hung in effigy and Rangers sent in to prevent bloodshed. It all started when a spineless Fed· eral judge ordered eleven Negroes ad· mittcd to the all. whitc school of Mans­field. The citizens of Mansfield, how­ever. had other idea,; and they let it be known in no un(!ertain terms that their white and (;Oiored children were not to be mixed in :he same school. A mob of 500 or more g<;thcrC'd around the school daily, The governor of Texas advised school officials at Mansfield to trans· fer any student to other schools if such a course was necessary in pre· venting violence. The governor was quoted in lhe press as saying at Austin: "Personally, I hope the United States Supreme Court will be given an opporlt•nily to view the effect of its desegregation order on a typical law· abiding Tcx<ts Community". Another National Political Convention Puts The Democrats and Republicans in the Shade While the Democrats at Chicago and the Republicans at San Fran· cisco were making vague and ambiguous promises to do everything for everybody and wer e shaping hazy and indist inct platforms on which to run for office, another national convention was being held which left no doubt where its candidates stood. This was the national convention of the Organized Hoboes of America held in Britt, Iowa, August 21 , and which attracted some 20,000 knights of the road all of whom are loyal. if not paid-up. mem­bers of the National Tourists Union. Candidates put in nomination for the office of King of Hoboes were Scoop Shovel Scotty, veteran hitchhiker on the American high­ways and Hobo Benson whose extensive coverage of the United States has been done by the more luxurious mode of travel known as "riding the rods" of a freight train. While the Champagne, Bourbon and Scotch which inundated Chi­cago aud San Francisco delegates was understandably missing from the menu, the absence of these stimulating refreshments was partially compensated for by the presence of a huge pot of Mulligan Stew which graced the festive board. The platform as it was finally adopted is believed to represent the greatest and most powerful demand for social justice since William Jennings Bryan came out for free silver. It calls for a maximum of four hours of work a day, four days of work a week, a three month's paid vacation in summer and the re­vision of all welfare laws so as to provide $100 per mont~ for all persons who have been deprived either by nature or the Federal Un­emploYment Compensation act. of all desire to participate in any form of physical labor. It urges the picketing by accredited members of the guild of the back doors "'Of private homes in all cases where a free _handout has either been refused or qoes not measure up in quality or quantity to the specifications of accepted standards. Looking toward a long-range program whose objective is to provide more time for leisurely contemplation and restful relaxation on the part of tired humanity, the platform calls on all self-respecting and responsible hoboes to gird their loins for a big push on Congress in the interest of passage of a "right-not-to-work law" and the adoption by the administration in power of a domestic policy which will guar-antee all-Ame!"'icans "freedom from toiP'. · The only deviation from regular convention proceedings was the decision of the body to by-pass the outmoded custom of selecting the winning candidate by vote of State delegations and to settle the matter by an open and above-board slugging match bdween the two contest­ants. This rule was adopted and the proceedings came to an abrupt end, along ,vith Scoop Shovel Scotty's aspirations for public office, as a haymaker from Hobo Benson knocked him of[ the platform and out of the race. Fair Deal Demo crats and Fair Deal Republicans have held their national conve ntions at Chicago and San Francisco, respectively. Where once the delibe rations, discussions and conclusions of such conclaves hinged around defense of the Constitution, exaltation of the Free Enterprise System based on Christia n principles as the bulwark of American greatne ss and recognition of the Constitutional rights of the sovereign States to handle their own affairs, no word was spoken and no line written in the Windy City or in the metropolis by the Golden Gate re-affirming these basic b e liefs in the institut ions ·.and gove rning processes of the Ame rican Repub lic. Imp a rtia lly, both gatherings demonstrated tha t - unde r curre nt concept ions of political a nd moral e'thics - a President ial nominating co nvention is merely a n occasion for the maximum e xercise of human ton­gues and minimum utilization of human brains. Never were so many words employed by so many speakers to say so 1ittle as in the case of the evasive, meaning­es> and equivocal statements which clogged the air and flooded the channels of'communication during the Chicago fiasco and the San Francisco flop. Meantime, all that long suffering taxpayers can look forward to during the forthcoming campaign is a spirited battle between two dedicated internationalist left-wingers. It will not be a fight for the restoration of Constitu­t ional g overnment in the United States; for the pres­e rvation of American sovereignty against attempts by alien conspirators to destroy it; for the reclama tion of lost Ame rican p restige throughout the world; fo r the maintena nce of the rights, dignity and well-being of the overwhelming ma jo rity o f the American people in all area s and sections of the land .but r a t her a life-and­death struggle fo r p ossession of the key to the front door of the White House which bot h ca ndidates fee l is now in the keeping of the Negro voters .of Harlem, a nd allied mino':ity groups ~f the North a nd East. Neither at Chicago nor al San Francisco was there any indication that the administration of the Federal Government under the provisions of the Constitution, rather than under the rules of psychology or the Communist Manifesto, is to be made ~n issue of the campaign. No planks were adopted at either place which are not already familiar to the American people from firs~ having appeared in the Socialist platform before the principles and policies of that party were absorbed by the Democratic and Republican organizations which pres­ently constitute our so-called two-party system. Also, it is notable that no speeches were made and nothing stlid at either convention, with two exceptions, that could be classed as a great and outstanding address such as those once heard al th e official gatherings of the nation's leaders and party chiefs. The first exception was the masterly "Challenge which. Georgia's governor, the Honorable Marvin Griffin, hurled at' the closmg s e ~s ion at Chicago in which he vigorously protested the total disregard of par­liamentary rules and the denial of prerogatives to duly elected dele­gates by the presiding officer of the convention and in which he roundly scored them for the fa ilure of any speaker to even mention Constitution­al government and the Rights of States. Governor Griffin ended his denunciation by nominating for Pres· ident the Honorable James C. Davis, Congressman from Georgia and who, incidentally - although his name received no consideration from the phonies dominating the convention - was the only r eal Democrat (Continued on Page 2) M i II i o n 5 of A m e ric a n 5 T h i n k I t-T h e S o u t h e r n C o n s e r v at i v e S a y 5 I t Page 2 THE SOUTHERN CONSERVATIVE September, 1956 The Day Was When All Nations Type of .Lawma~er ~h~ Is Party line Is Being No Cred1t To H1s D1str1ct Respected and Feared the U.S. WhenaHo!lywoodcitizen,aMr Closely Followed· The dastardly and deliberate act of the Chinese Communists in shooting down an· AmericaQ plane in which 16 men are betieved to have lost their lives and for which the Chinese bandits made no apol­ogy, serves to remind us that not so many years ago no nation on earth would have dared commit such an act of aggression against the armed forces of the United States. On the day that we first began mixing into the internal affairs of all nations and pouring billions of dollars into the treasuries of practically every country on earth. we started losing the respect of the world. That respect has continued to dwindle until even a gang of brig­ands such as those who make up Gommunist China, feel that they are perfectly safe in killing Amer­ican soldiers without fear of re­prisal. And still both political parties who are equally responsible for ---- our senseless and indefensible for­eign policy were cheered to the echo at Chicago and San Fran­cisco within recent weeks. All State of Tennessee Lacks Is Sound Leaders The good people of Tennescee foresaw the Porrible violence that is taking place at 2linton as there­sult of the action of a jelly-spined Federal judge who ordered the SChool Board there to allow Ne­groes in the white school.· Members of their legislature passed a bill which would have prevented integration sometime ago, but the bobbysoxer's delight, Governor Frank Clement, prompt­ly vetoed it. There is nothing wrong with the people of Tennessee. They feel like all other Southerners do about the mixing of the races in the schools. It is only their leadership that is craven. Two Major Parties <conunncd Fcom Page I> offered as a candidate to head the ticket at any time during the entire proceedings. The second exception was the brave effort of former President, Herbert Hoover, who ma?e a gallant, but futile, attempt at San Fran­cisco to point the course of his party back toward the obective of Constitutional government when he said: ;<If you here calculate what will please this or that minor seiment of our population. and satisfy this or that pressure group or sectional interest, you will be betraying 3our opportunity and tragically miss­ing the call of your time. Today the greatest issue in America and all mankind is the encr~achment of gove:nment to master our lives. If you temporize with Socialism in any of tts disguises, you will stimu­late its growth and make certain the defeat of free men". The convention cheered him heartily and went right ahead with its task of "pleasing minor segments of .our population, satisfying pressure groups and temporizing with Socialism to make certain the defeat of free men". There was only a single instance during the Chicago and ,the San Francisco sessions where human ingenuity, resourcefulness and in­spired imagination caused the achievements of one gathering to soar above the accomplishments of the other and that was when California's governor, Goodie Knight, gave a blow-out thai made the shindig which Perle Mesta threw in Chicago look like an ic2 cream social at a country church. While Perle with all her wealth, her publicity blurbs as 41the hostess with the mostest" and her acknowledged leadership in the glorified rat-race known as VVashington society, was able to pour only two glasses o[ bubbling champagne down the thirst-parched gullets of the 800 free·loaders who fought, scratched and clawed their way into her swank soiree, Goodie is reported to hav~ provided such quan­tities of the sparkling giggle juice that his 10,000 guzzling guests finally wound up with the stuff practically oozing out of their ears. After all, the prestige of the party in power must be maintained and no doubt the Democratic Fair Dealers who were elbowed away from the gravy train four years ago, grudgingly conceded this superior social advantage to the opposition. Otherwise the two conventions were much alike and with no distinguishing features which set one apart from the other. One was held ncar the stock yards in Chicago and the other in the Cow Palace in San FrancisCo but the "bull" which permeated both auditoriums was so equ!.lly balanced as to give them an even break. Both heavily emphasized the "give-away" motif anq. tried to out­prori; ise each other in the matter of generosity with taxpayers' money and in conferring ''benefits" on a panhandling public which sees nothing degrading in accepting federal handoUts from our two political parties both of which have firmly established the principle that poverty and indolence are cardinal virtues to which taxpayers must pay tribute while industry and thrift are qualifications carrying sinister connota­tions. Carl Mote, Jr., wrote a letter of protest to representatives in ~ash- A Texas ncwspapcl" is running a ington during the last sessiOn of series of articles on the Supreme Congress against the passage of the Court ruling on segregation and its cr~ Alaska Mental Health Bill, he re- fects in Texas. ceived this reply from one Ab~ In these articles it is pointed out raham J. Multer, repreSentlng the that in the relatively few districts !;~~ ~~s~~i~tm~fnt~~\~eJ~~k~il~~~~ :~:r:o~~.cagsr~~~~~~a:sb~:~~sf~l~~t!~t~~ siglled into law by our Republican out -publicity nnd ·an attempt made president, after it has been passed to attract as little attention as pos-by a Democratic Congress, I will sible. ~ make a special request that the This is not surprising as Common-first bed be reserVe~ for you". ist policy demands this sort of pro~ This arrogant and insulting re- cedure and in all Comn~uni st litera­ply by a member of Congress to ture on the subj_cct it 1s instructed an American citizen who · seeks tO" --that the races be mtegratcd gradually exercise the American right of pe- in various phases of life such as sp.orts, titian, is an appalling example of entertainment, church.es .. schools, etc., the low-grade politicians who. in in order that the obJCcttves may be Iar too many cases, are elected to accomplished befOre 1 he general pub­our highest law-making body to lie becomes aware of what is taking help make the laws under which place. decent people~ must live. A rude, uncouth and discourte­ous public servant not only lowers the moral standards of the office which he holds but is a reproach to the intelligence and integrity of the constituents who elected him. is all there is to that. lf every subscriber to lite South· ern Conservative would persuade just one othe1· person to also be· come a subscriber, it would help to gTeatly increase the Circulntion nnd would be deeply nppreciated by the editor. "To add to the tragedy and dash any hopes of those who hold that a President of the United States should be an unyielding partisan of his own country and dedicated pri­marily to its advancement. interests and well-being, the United Nations issued a press release following the Democratic con­vention which said: 'The nomination of Governor Adlai Ste­venson of Illinois was generally welcomed today by United Nations delegates ... The selection of Mr. Stevenson, to­gether with the nomination of Dwight D. Eisenhower as the Republican candidate, was taken as an assurance that, whoever was electeO, the basic foreign policy of the·United States would continue to follow the pattern fixed by President Truman ... The fact that both Governor Stevenson and General Eisen­hower are internationalists is expected to reduce uncertainties over the policy that the United States will folfow in the Gen­eral Assembly'. ''This stamp of approval placed on both candidates by the United Nations .insures that fhe American people may expect no more consideration at the hands of the 11ext President of the United States than the citizens of backward countries around the world will be privileged to enjOy. "It means that our next Chief Executive must divide his allegiance equally between the interests of the industrious tax­payers of the United States and the welfare of shiftless mendi­cants of foreign lands. "This is evidence that our accepted foreign policy for the nex~ four years is to be based on the Marxian philosophy of 'takmg from each according to his means and giving to each according to his needs'. "It is a sad day in the history of a nation when the people in selecting their leader. are' forced to choose the lesser of two evils but, Brother, that's just exactly where we are in this year of our Lord, 1952. "It is a fundamental right of the American people to have two candidates for President w~o represent opposite ideologies and, .in these perilous times w1th the future of the Republic hangmg in the balance, it is doubly essential that we enjoy this prerogative. Bold bids were mafle by both conventions for the support of special classes and voting blocs such as farm groups, labor unions and religious and racial minorities but there was no Balm in Gilead for the millions of sound, conservative Americans in this country, including • the 58,000,000 qualified voters who faiJed, or refused, to vote for either Stevenson Or Eisenhower in 1952. "We should be able io choose between a candidate. whp believes in Constitutional government without eqmvocation or exception; 01_1e wh~ bol?ly denounces corruption in govern­ment, including infiltration of Communists and domination by labor unions or any other group or class; one who is unalter· ably opposed to Socialism as embodied in the United Nations and who is alert to the danger to our sovereignty by any sub­versive world group; one who is outspoken in defense of the rights of the States to conduct, without any outside inter­ference, the internal affairs of the people including their social customs, employment practices and any other rights granted to them by the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States. "We should, on the other hand, have the chance to vote for a candidate who represents the opposite principles and who advocates State Socialism as promulgated by RoQ_sevelt and Truman for the past twenty years. "This privilege is not to be granted us for both candidates hold such similar views on many vital issues that they might When these two candidates were before the voters in the last as well be cross-filed on both tickets". campaign, we had an editorial in the September, 1952, edition of the Southern Conservative giving our views on both and we see no reason why· we should not reproduce the following excerpts from that edi­torial at this time since the situation is much the same - except a lot worse - at this good hour than it was four years ago: "'Whether we like it or not- and most of us don't- either Dwight D. Eisenhower running on a so-_callcd Republican ticket or Adlai Stevenson campaigning on a so-called Democratic ticket, \\'ill be the next President of the United States and that Those were our views in 1952 and nothing has occurred within the past four years to cause us to revise our position in 1956. The field is white and the workers few but we still believe that there are enough Americans whose patriotism and national pride haye not been deadened by the tranquilizing pill of internationalism, to restore Constitutional government in the United States if they would only perform intelligently, organize efficiently and act in unison in defense of the American RepubliC. September, t95b THE SO UTHE RN C ON S E R~A TIVE Page 3 Some Charitable Observations on the Doings at Chicago and San Francisco What Adlai s~id about Estes in the primary ca-mpaigns, what the Negroes, CIO and other liberal r iffraff groups and head the Texas Estes said about Adlai and what Harry said about both of them should delegation .to Chicago, responsible Texans still remember him as a provide the Republicans with some ready-made campaign material. former errand boy for Roosevelt who slid into the Senate on a stqlcn * * * base. Republicans are making a lot out of the fact that unity and harmony keynoted the San Francisco convention, forgetting that Hitler, Stalin and Mussolini were always returned to office by ·'atclamation" while harmony reigned all over the place. Unity and harmony are essential elements in a dictatorship but deadly in a Constitutional Republic. The right to dissent is an American prerogative. * * * "It is my privilege and my great pleasure to introduce to you a great Democrat, a great American and a great orator who will now address you briefly" was Sam Rayburn's stock phrase in presenting his contemporaries at Chicago. Whereupon, some long-winded old bore would ascena the platform and make a liar out of him by taking a half hour to say nothing. * * * We are sure that the venerable Mr. Rayburn musi have wished many times during the proceedings that he could resort to the custom once employed by New York's Lower East Side theaters on amateur night. The stage director was provided with a long pole which was hooked at ·the end. When a rotten performer got lo the point where he was inspiring catcalls and boos, the director reached out with the pole, hooked him around the throat anclcalmly yanked him off the stage. * * * One such "great orator" introduced by Chairman Rayburn was ~~0t~~rg!;~~~;o~~ ~:rfin~~~a~~~ea u0~~ h~de;:~~~~~e:~~ti~ne1~\~~:;~ squirming in their seats as he rambled on interminably about the great achievements of the New and Fair Deals. There are few spectacles more revolting than the sight of a bloated old multimillionaire Social­ist spouting off about "freedom from want", shedding crocodile tears as he demands that other people "share the wealth" with the under­privileged. and then buzzing off in his air-conditioned Cadillac. - * * * It is widely believed that Eisenhower was in o"h Stassen's abortive attempt to dump Nixon and that if the movement had developed any widespread opposition to the vice pr esident, the president would have heaved him overboard so quick it would have made his head swim. As it turned out, poor dumb Stassen was the goat and was 1eft to wander around the Cow Palace like a lost soul. * * * The conceited little ass from Independence jumped up and down like a jack-in-the-box during the proceedings at Chicago and when hE> fina11~ managed to get the platform, he brayed himself right out of the p1cture. It is a tragic and regrettabla thing when a great man is cut down but when a pipsqueak bites the dust, there are few who mourn his end. * * * From the acceptance speech of Stevenson at Chicago and that of Eisenhower at San Francisco, it is clear that the two top candidates intend to go easy on Civil Rights and let the second men on the ticket do the dirty work. Eisenhower will tread lightly around the subject in an effort to rope in Southen votes and Stevenson will sweet-talk his way through the South for the same reason. The smelly job of corraling the Negro vote will be left to Nixon and Kefauver who have noth ing to lose as neither of them has any standing in the South, any way. · * * * The biggest joke pulled at the Chicago convention was the act by Adlai S tevenson when he played it straight and didn't smile as he announced to the assembled convention that the nomination for vice h~~~~;thi~~ut~d sZ; i0ri~~e t~:f:e~~~~I~ :nf~~h:~e: t~~~~~ep:Z:~~~~~ nomination was all settled weeks in advance when Kefauver swapped such of his delegates as he could control to Stevenson in return for which the former Illinois governor wa's to put a bug in the right ears at the right time to cinch Kefau ver's selection for second place on the ticket. It's all done with mirrors. * '* * We imagine that Lyndon J oh nson emerged from the Chicago con­vention with more respect for Governor Allan Shivers of ·Texas than he had previously shown when he was being kidded into believing that he was a big shot by Reuther's CIO boys in Texas. Johnson lost everything at Chicago except' his shirt and when Stevenson put a fast one over and secretly selected Kefauver for vice presidential nomi­nee, a man whom Johnson holds in very low esteem, he was said to be Y~h~s~ l~i:ed~~n~l iih~h~vae;~~~d:\t~d 1i~e~ h:~; t~m~;e f~:gr:e;;~~hhei~ 1-told-you-so attitude. Shivers had warned J ohnson that stevenson was a double-cr.osser, who was not to be trusted out of sight, but J ohnson had to learn the hard way. * * * I ncidentally, Lyndon Joh nson had never been regarded in Texas as a serious candidate for the presidency, the vice-presidency or even as a favorite son. In spite of the fact that he was able to throw in with * * * It is understood that Stevenson selected Kefauver as his running mate because of the horse-faced Tennessean's a:ati-Southern, left-wing stand on Civil Rights and his refusal to sign the Southern Manifesto which tarried the signature of practically all Southern senators except those of Kefauver and Johnson of Texas. Thus Stevenson will play the role of a "moderate" candid3te, or a political eunuch so to speak, while Kefauver makes his pitch along lines laid down by NAACP. CIO, ADA and other pro-Red groups. By playing both ends against the middle and working both sides o! the street, these two political city slickers hope to make a cleanigg. Ain't statesmanship grand? * * * Averill Harriman, the multimil lionaire Socialist, was another cas­ualty of the Chicago convention whose presidential ambitions were permanently stymiea. History will probably record him as merely thP man who built the greatest number oi governm-ent-subsidized comfort stations ever erected in the Philippine Islands. * * * Eisenhower's speech of acceptance at San Francisco in which no fundamental princ:iple of the American Republic was touched on, was reminiscent of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "pie-in-the-sky" and "bright­new- world-of-tomorrow" technique through which the New Deal presi­dent was able to keep unthinking Americans hypnotized until the day of his death. * * * O~e of the unfathomable mysteries of American political conven~ tions IS the selection of a carefully-screened committee whose mcm­~ ers will spend days and nights sweating and laboring over the word­mg. of their party platform, editing ~ amending, changing and revising unhl they are convmced that ~very group and every section is properly pacified, placated and appeased. Then, on the day after the election this plat[o~m will be f iled away in a pigeon-hole and completely for~ gotten until four yea rs have passed arid it is time to run for office again. * * * Wayne Morse had a busman's holiday at the Chicago convention where he gave a first-hand demonstration of the manner in which he empties the Senate Chamber in Washington by merely getting up to ?peak. Some years ago Morse was kicked in the head by a horse while visiting in his home state of Oregon. A lot of people think that is what's wrong with him now. However, he was reported at the time to have suffered no ill effects from the accident, although the horse's hoof was said to have been permanently injured. * * * In our July-August edition, we said concerning the selection of Frank. Cle~~~t, governo~ of Tenn~ssee, . to ma~e the keynote speech a.t C~ICago. ~loquent, high-soundmfo! words will flow from his ruby hps hke escapmg gas from an open Jet, but when the shouting is over ;l:~nt~; =~~l=~i~ ~~~t~li~:~. ~:~e~: o~i~ ~~~; it~ltJ~o~fn~ ~~~gn~~c! he ~ad_e h1_s SJ?ee~h and therefore didn't hear him but we feel that our ,.. pred1chon IS vmdiCated. Nobody can tell us what he said although many 'Stated that it sounded good and that he was "elo'quent". Even news­paper reporters were vague about the contents of his address and used most of their space in comparing him to Billy Graham or Elvis Presley. * * * During the Republican convention in Chicago in 1952 Senator D.irksen of Illinois endeared ~ imsel~ t? the people of t.he South by h1s eloquent plea for conservative pnnc1ples and for the nomination of Senator Taft. Today his rating is very poor in the same area because of his disgusting activities in behalf of the mongrelization prograrn of Fair Deal Republicans, to whom he seems to have surrendered lock stock and barrel ' -* * * According to a special writer on the Chicago Daily News, Walter Reuther was observed sneaking up the back stairs in the dead of night on ?is way .to Adlai :Stevenson's suite during the Chicago pow­wow. Which provides us with the unhappy reminder that the behind-t~ e~~~~~:~~~:~~~~1do;rr!~~rU~~~~rSJ~~etsh!~~ the next f9ur years will * * * It is conceded without al'gument that there are more horse's necks in Washington than there are hor ses and the consensus of opinion has a~wa~s been th~t Estes Kefauver accounted for the major portion of th1s surplus equme anatomy. And so we place him in a position where he could conceivably one day become P resident of the United States. * * * Some persons have gotten the idea that, because Harold Stassen's head is out of all proportion to his body in size, his cranial section must contain an extra supply of brains, forgetting t.hat an over-stuffed sofa filled with saw-dust produces the same effect. Page 4 The Southern Conservative A MONTHLY PUBLICATION OF EDITORIAL OPINION WITH NATIONAL CIRCULATION IDA M, DARDEN, Editor Editorial Offices Flatiron Building Fort Worth, Texas Phone ED 2-2089 Price $5.00 Per Year T H E ·s 0 U T H E R N C 0 N S E R V A T I V E The Conservative Groups In The South Will Pool Resources In All-Out Fight Wh ile the various Conservative groups which have been organiz­ed in opposition to the two liberal major parties are regarded as of Soufhern origin, these movements have attracted wide support from the English-speaking people of New York and other population centers of the North, Ellst and West. During August and September there have been regional and State meetings held by t he separate organiZations composing the Conser vative movement, and a coahtion ot these forces is expected to be brough t about well before t he November electiqn. - September, 1956 Constitution Criticised By [)ne Who Swore To Uphold It As most Americans probably realize by this time, Earl Warren is Chiel Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. Most of them also realize that his decision on Segregation, concurred in by the other eight weaklings •on the Court, has stirred up racial bitterness throughout the' South which had not heretofore been experienced since the close of the Civil War. And while this dissension stri!e and violence is taking place, Mr. Warren according to the press, is in India (Evtry p•ld subscriber is entitled toone free subscription to besenttot~nyperson ofhi5ehposing.) The Constitution Party held its national convention in Fort Worth on August 27-28 which claimed representation from 37 States and adopted a platform calling for adherence to the Constitution, the Rights of States, the repeal of the income tax amendment and such other planks as were once taken for granted as part of the commitment to the American people by the major partie.s before they deserted to.. the cause of National Socialism. where he made a public speech to Keynote speakers at this convention were Mary Cain of Mississippi Nehru's collaborators with Russia in and Fred Spangler of Texas, both of whom stressed the abandonment which he strongly criticised the Amer· Sent without eosf to members of Congreu, of Constitutional government by the Republicans and Democrats and ican Constitution and claimed that its memben of St .. ta Legi5latures, Governors, the need for a virile, dynamic party to replace them. overhauling had been due fo r fo rty and other public officials. T. Coleman Andrews, former collector of Internal Revenue was years, or words to that ef(ect. nominated by -the Constitutionalists for president, Thomas H. Werdel Maybe that is true but as it now A helpless sparrow can drift with former Congressman from California for vice president and it is be- stands, that Constitution. provides that the wind but it takes an eagle to fly Jievecf that all the other Conservative groups will make the same Supreme Court Judges shall hold their against the dorm. selection. office only during good behavior. On September 15, We, the People, a group of strong Conserva- In line with that provision of the Lives, with headquarters in Chicago, will begin a two-day meeting Constitution, we submit that Warren's at THE TENTH AMENDMENT TO the Conrad Hilton Hotel in that city, when the Honorable Clarence term of officP. should be Immediately THE CONSTITUTION-OF THE UNITED STATES: Manion will make the keynote address. ended. At the Chicago convention a plan whereby all conservative groups It does not :-equire much cour- The powen not delegated to the United may work together is tO be presented by the Honorable Hugh Grant of age to speak disrespectffully oC the ~~·t~t' ~0Y t~; ~:~:~it~~i:n,re~;;v:do~~bi~i,~ Georgia and a panel of other prominent Americans from various sec- American~ Constitution to the pea- States re,peeti~elv. or to the people. tions of the country. pie of far-off India, but we believe On Tuesday, August 21, a called meeting of the Executi~e Com- that the Chief Justiee would hesitate mittee of Mississippians for States Rights was hekl in Jackson when before making similar assertions in, the selection of eight independent presidential electors was ' made. let us say, Texas, Mississippi. Tennes­Present at this gathering were interested visitors and onlookers from- see, Alabama and some of the other Should Read It and Weep - ~:~~~;·· Louisiana, Tennessee and Texas but who took no part in the ~~sut~.:::r~~~ting':':he;; ~:~~~rc~~~~:,:! Every American Taxpayer Our nominatio11 for the soundest Announcement was made at the Jackson meeting that Independent document are making things pretty and most unanswerable discussion electors are already on the ballot 1 in 16 States and that similar action rugged for upright, honorable and so far made by anybody, any- is expected in other States. . . . . l~:·abiding citizen_: of both races where and at any titne concerning . On Scptef!lbe~. 14 and 15, a JOmt meetmg of For Amen ca, Federa- rloht now. i~: ~~!~~c~~·~~~e~~~n~~~g~~%~: ~~~~;0~o~~~~X~~~~on~;g~;;~~;;,~:n~il~a:;:~::g?nfo~.;;',~~~~. s;:~e~e:s~~ -Fr-ie-n-ds_S_e- rv-ic_e_ Committee by Frank Chodorov. ' when it is expected that c.oalition of all Conservative forces w•ll be Is Denounced By A~~~~·;~~~. i~n~t~~;t.~ fvc::St: ~~ thor~~~~;; t~~n~ui~:0ri~~f s~~:~g~~t~;~~h~~:a~~~~~us conservative groups DT's" or "How the American Gov- ts not to. be compared to that of ~1berals ~n~ left-wmgers who ha':e Texas Quakers ~~~~~~~sg~~u;,~o;t"~:r~er~~~ ~:.i ~:fl:t,t~~'~;o~f; bceo~~~~mf~;;~r a~n~~,;e0~f1~':' s~~~te~:·i·~ ~~e t~~~: The American Friends Service Committee which has been the re­cipient of much criticism in recent years because of its alleged pro-Com­munist leanings, was Charged by the Texas Quakers who compose the Friendswood Quarterly meeting of the ~eligious Society of Friends with having "furthered Communist propa­ganda." blistering indictment of the mad- se~·vahve cause have pomted .out, ~hey have somthmg wh~ch the le~~er­men in Washington wh? haVe play- ~~:~g~~y~he two maJor parties cannot boast and that rs - political ~~ 0~g3~.~;n~~~:ke~::{~ $~~~00jj . Americans who have- stood _still an~ criticised the Socialistic be- ;;~~~:~;;::l~r:.!ro~;a:payers' ?:v~~~~;r~~~f:;sr~~;~ew~";;o h~:~o~rf.''cr~"o"t C::re~/~~v%ri~~c~!e:\~~o~~ privilege to read. ev een our ~~b~~~~t~~;t;~~: ~~m~~~~d s~f%~r:~~o :~~~diFulr:iF!e~~! ~~e-1~;6 Ev~~t~~ti83~e~i,~ ~;;etet,toW~s~T:~= ~h~e~~~~ ~~:~fd~~~vention in one small room, and by 1860 was able ton, 6; D: C. ";'11.1 brmg one o~ thes,e As for us we pray God's blessings on each and every member folders conta1!11n~ Mr. Chorodov s of these organizations who are fighting for the return of Constitutional m~tchl.ess edrtonal and . a dollar government u nder seemingly insurmountable handicaps and remind ~Ill bnng ten o~ t~em .. It ~~not par - them that every successful movement in history was begun when only ~\c;~;~~o~~~'sm~~~~i~a\7o~!eb~t s!l~ a few were gathered together in a righteous cause. wish from the bottom of our heart ~:1\=~e~rai~~-~~r;~gr!~~k~i!np~r~ The More This Veto Is Analyzed ~~~~ar version of how we got that The Less Sense it Makes to . Us From a business executive· in Detroit: ·'Lady, you have just about made me revise 1n.y opinion of women as far as pol'itics is concerned. ,It has always see-nerL to me that most of them are ·n­capp. ble of making a sound di.>­cussion of issues. Now, yon t ... ke Eleanor Roosevelt (Editor's note: You take her yourself; we don t want her) and you have an ex· cunple of a woman w1io is con­stantly talking but does not Jcn(JW what sh~ 's saying. I am glad to note that m.any wovten are now us~ng their brain and cl'oing their own thinking. I think yow· pape1· has encouraged them along this line." We wonder if it is true, as re­ported, that Ellen BDrden Stev­enson, Adlai's divorced wife,- is writing a book to be caUed uThe Egghead and 1." There are those who still be­lieve that the President vetoed the Fullbright gas bill at the last session of Congress because his moral sense was offended at the appearance of attempted bribery in connection with its passage. Meantime, Federal regulation of th.e production and distribu tion of gas at the well-head continues and it would seem that t_he immorality involved in this invasion of the Rights of States by Washington would cause a Constit utional Pres­ident of the United States more pain and humiliation than the re­ported offer of a $2,500 campaign contribu tion to a member of the Senate by a repr~sentative of an oil company. • This would especially seem to be the case in view of the fact that it was brought out at the time that the same representative of the same oil company made a contribu-tion in 1952 to the Republican Campaign committee in the same amount of $2,500, and certainly the President cannot view that dona­tion as an attempted "bribery". Maybe we just have a suspicious and evil mind but we think there would be only one reason for a veto of this bill - which shou1d have been approved - and that would be because the one exerds· ing the veto approves of Fed ·~ ra l regulation in all cases, from gas on down to local public sc};lool sys­tems, although publicly claiming otherwise. ' (< Eve1·y strike is a small revo­lu, tio!t and a dress rehearsal for the big oneu - from Labor De­fender, December 15, 1918. This warning from a publication rep­resenting the IWW, forerunner of the CIO, is just as applicable now as it was in 1918. These charges were made at a meet­ing of the Tex'as group at the Bay .. shore Friends Church at Baclift in Galveston County, re~ently. The American Friends Scncice Committee is a subsidiai·y o£ the Re­ligious Society of Friends and has not b.een repudiated by the parent group as the Federation !or Social Action was repudiated by the Meth­odist Church, although the Friends­wood meeting at Baclifi charged that control of the Committee "has passed out of the hands of the legitimate Society of Friends." The Baclif£ meeting further claimed that the Committee fosters liberal, unitarian religious doctrines, and that its Institutes of Internationel Rela~ tions are "schools for Communist propaganda and liberal religions." At Austin, one F. E. Hutchins, ex­ecutive sCcretary of the regional of­fice of the American Friend§' Service Committee, received the charges of the Friendswood group with the bland admission: "We are accustomed to having asperations cast at us" as if this, somehow, were a form of dis­tinction. It is not known whether the Austin Hutchins is, or ·is not related to Rob­ert M. Hutchins of the Ford Fund For the Republic who is also being kept quite busy at this time denying charges of advancing Commw1ist in­terests in this country. w •t ir le 's r­e r• te .e nt ~~ he of ith et-jce le­Jlas ent ial ~~: hat d ex­or­ice of and to sil dis· September, 1956 THE SOUTHERN " CONS£RVATIVE Page 5 ACLU' s Elmer Davis Asks "Protection Money" to . Defend the Bill of Rights Many Should Bogus "Mental Be Investigated Health" Groups By Congress What the difference is between ' 1Civil Liberties" and "Civil Rights'\ we wouldn't know. We only know that leftists groups are working both subjects for all the traffic will bear. Those old boys in the Kremlin back there in October, 1927, who first thought up the idea of ::;tilTing up strife among Negroes and other minority groups in the United States by reminding them that their "Civil Rights" and Civil Lib· erties" were being violated and thereby promoting the interests of Communism i.n this country, per­haps dicfn't realize at the time hc.w aggressively some of their ideo· logical allies here would latch on to their suggestion and promote the idea for all it was worth. So much emphasis has been placed on the matter that we have recently seen the two major po­litical parties in the United States practically relegate all other issues to the background while they sweated and labored to say just exactly the proper things in their "civil rights" planks and their plat­form writers did a balancing act on a tight rope as they endeavored to attract the 11minority" vote with­out, at the same time, repelling the "majority vOte". It was quite a feat of political acrobatics but both parties apparently feel that they have "gofle and do11e it". Perhaps inspired to greater ac~ tivity by all this concern in the minority races, the American Civil Liberties Union, now gets into the act by making a bid for some of the easy money that is always available to Pinkos under what­ever name. In August a letter went out to prospective contributors from this American Civil Liberties Union signed by Elmer Davis, as a mem­ber of the National Committee. Mr. Davis warns that the Bill of Rights needs protecting and as evidence of this great need, he points out that "Emmett Till's murderers are free". What he intends to do about a criminal case which the legal au­thorities of the sovereign State of Mississippi have officially disposed 'Of is not made clear in his letter so~ liciting financial aid and we great­ly fear that the "protecton" he proposes to give the Bill of Rights would largely resemble that which a wolf might offer to a coop full of fat chickens. Names of the sponsors of any organiaztion always intrigue us and those on the letterhead of Mr. Davis' ACLU outfit held such fas­cination for us that w"e decided to make a run-down on them. There are 29 members of the Board of Directors and 78 members of their National Committee. Of these 107 men and women whose hearts are bleeding for the "civil liberties" of their downtrodden fellowm,en, 59, -or more than one-half, have official citations as having belonged to one or more Communi'it fronts dedi- -- cated to the overthrow of the American government. Perhaps some one should set up an organization to protect the American form of government from the protectors of "civil liber­ties". After all, what· good will their "civil liberties" do them if they are able to abolish tl)e only government in the world which could insure such "liberties"? If arly of .... the fuzzy-brained Pinkos on the ACLU letterhead are able to intelligently answer that question, even we will be Willing to kick in and send Davis the ten bucks which he is asking American suckers to send him. Books Too FHthy .For tl. S. Mail Are Given Teenagers To Read There is no nobler profession on the face of the ear,h than that seCtion of medicine which is dedicated to the art of mental healing. The reclamation of a human mind from the dark pit of insanity is one of the richest achievements which is within the power of mortal man to The acting postmaster at Larkspur, fulfill. Californiit, where the courageous By bhe same token, the most de­Anne Smart has been carrying on a ~ generate and depraVed specimens in one-woman campaign against lewd, the sewers of civilized society are obscene and subversive books in the those psychiatrists who mix their pro-high schools in the Tamalpais dis- ~~~:;i~~tea~~ei~o~~i~~le~~~v~t~~s g~~t~ trict, has -ordered that no · quotations to the promotion of fanciful ideological from the books even can be sent theories or who undertake to brain­wash vast segments of humanity in the Because of their obscenity, these interest of one-world government. books or quotations from them, vio- m~~!io~~~~~d ~~~=~7::!~onna: !~~c~~:~ through the mails. late U.S. code which prohibits the ning over with this type of off-color mailing of "obscene, lewd, lascivious psychiatrist whose pronouncements or filthy publications," the acting indicate that they are far more mental­postmaster s.aid. And now the officials of the schoolS in the Tamalpais district, and the of­ficials o! the National Education As­sociation, both of whom strongly de­fended the books and kept them in the school library for children tO read, must face the responsibility of pro~ viding material for teenagers to read which has officially been declared too offensive to be transported through the United States mail. Such foul books cannot be found in the Communist schools of Russia. The Communists only encourage the readings ·of such pornographic stuff by students in the countries which they wish to demoralize. A teacher providing Moscow pupils with such filth would probably be quietly taken out and shot. "2109" Is Valuable Contribution to -the Record of Subversion Circuit Riders, Inc., of Cincin­nati, Ohio, is a national indepen­dent group of Methodists which exposes and opposes the use of church facilities, programs and personnel for the spread of Social­istic propaganda. One of the invaluable services this organization has rendered is the publication of a brochure car-­rying the names and Communist front affiliation of 2)09 Methodist ministers throughout the United States. No comment is made in any case and the brochure merely lists the record of these ministers as taken from official reports of the investi­gating committee .• of Congr es.s and of the various states. The compila­tion was made, according to the publishers after years of meticu­lous research work, document! tion and the expenditure of consider­abl'e money. The title of this brochure is simply "2109" and the address of the organization sponsoring it is Circuit Riders, Inc., 18 East 4th Street, Cincinnati 2, Ohio and one dollar will bring the brochure- to those desiring it. It is understood that the organi­zation will also bring out the Com­munist front record of other de­nominations and the information should be of great value to those who are interested in keeping a file of subversive activities. ly unbalanced than any patient they might be called on to treat, and it is they who are giving a black eye to an honorable profession. If the Congress of the United States would make a thorough investigation of the whole "mental health" set-up, they would find that most of these national and international organiza­tions are merely propaganda medi­ums of a very sinister and dangerous type .and that, In the final analysis their subversive propaganda is direct­ed against the United States. All are openly committed to some form of one-world government and that means the end of the United States as a free, independent and sovereign Re­public. In their book, patriotism and love of one's own countryo is a form of insanity, oply "freedom from moral ity means freedom to think" and their top screwball, Dr. C. B. Chisholm who, by all accepted measure-nents of sanity Is as crazy as a bedbug, says that "even self-defense" involves "neurotic reaction" and especially when it means "defending one's own wealth from others who are in great need." Recently the World Fedcrntion for Mental Health which works closely with WHO of the United Nations with headquarters in London, issued its an­nual report which gan a list of its sponsors and associates in the various countries. • There were two pages of Americans shown as affiliated with the outfit and for the information of o"Ur read­ers we decided to go into their back­grounds by checking their reC"ords with official government files on sub-version. On this list serving as fhe American representatives Qf the World's Federa­tion for Mental Health, there were 37 individuals, both men and women, who have been cited os belonging to Communist organizations which advo­cote the overthrow of the American government. God knows it is dangerous enough to the security of this country when those in government, defense. educa­tion, religion and labor align them­selves with Communist causes but when those who tinker with the hu­man mind also seek such affiliation, it seems to us that it is high time something be done about it . .. PoliCies closely resembling those of Henry Wallace when he was Secretary of Agriculture, went into elfecf with the adoption of the Soil Bank plan. No little pigs are to be slaughtered nor crops plow­ed under but the principle is the same as farmers are to be paid cash for crops they don't plant. Unforgettable Memories of A Wonderful Western State Montana . . a great common­wealth of indescribable beauty ... where ·the snow never melts on its highest mountains but Spring dwells eternal in the warm hearts of its people . . a State which has poor ana inept representation in the United States Senate but a growing number of citizens dedi­cated to the cause of Constitution~ al gov~rnment . . Billings, its principal city ... as modern as tomorrow but keeping alive the traditions and appeal of the Old West . . . the half-way station between the Wyoming' oil empire on the South and the vast petro­leum industry of Canada on the North ... Where highly intelli­gent, informed and concerned ..... patriots are keenly alert to the dangers threatening the future of the Republic and who perhaps un­derstand the complexities and in-i~ i~~~~~e~f Stt~~e~0~:£t:ra~i;a~gt~~:! in more congested centers of popu­lation ... Such as Lucille and Bernard Kesselheim . . . Maude and Ralph Wiggenhorn . . . the Dan Williams . . W. M. and Naomi Clawson ... the Earl V. Clines ... R. M. Bower. and the employes of the Hall-Perry Ma­chinery Company, and many oth­ers ... Chctrming Kay Hines, bril­liant commentator of KGHL Ra­dio station who plans ..t class on the Constitut ion for this Fall ... Eddie Diteman, one of the West's most promising young artists ... The proprietor of .Huebner's Phar­macy who has a greater under­standing of the fundamental prin­ciples of the American governing system than many members of ·congress and who imparts much valuabl~ information on the sub­jeCt to his customers as he setves them '· . . In brief, a State and a City which form a bright and colorful pattern in the American des4gn for living ... a Sovereign State of the Union which may be slowly working its way out of the menace of bossism and unionism which has imperiled its greatness for years. We have been furnished a car~ bon copy of a letter Earl Warren wrote to Herman H. Ross of An­chorage, Alaska, on June 5th, 1948 just before he became a candidate for vice president on the Republic­an ticket with Dewey, in which he is shown as having said in part: uzn my opinion, there should be some overall rules_..in the matter C?f the relationship of the various segments of our population, par­ticularly where election to Federal office is involved. Local problems, ~ however, whether they be on this ­or any other subject, shouid be dealt with by local government. We cannot "wpe to have a vigor.­ous democracy in America unless this is our firm policy." It woutd be most interesting to know who, o1· what changed his mind so com­pletely between 1948 and 1952 w1len he completely turned a som­ersault. A headline. says that State De­partment officials are seeking ex­pulsion of Reds from the United Nations. That's fine but how about getting them out of the State De­pa1" tment, too? P •_g•-6------------------------~~H_ E so_ u_ TH_ ER _N _c_o_N_ S E ~R_V_A_T_IV__E __________________se_ p+_•m_b_e,r__l9-56 Senators Who Voted Against Two I We Stick Our Ne'ck Out to Hi~hly Undesirable Appointees I p!·::~}~.! qu~~?=~~?r~ o~;~.~~~! them but for the In our last edition, we promised ------- -- - - letters recently asking our opin- purposes of this discussion, that to publish the names of members In France, taxes are so high that ion on whether Dwight D. Eisen- designation w~ll suffice. of the Senate who voted against the owner of a 30-room chateau bower or Adlai St~venson will win the confirmation of Simon Sobe- at. Poitiers blew it up 1!'ith dyna- the race for .Prestdent in the No­) off, the appointee of the White ~~e e~~~~u:e~ ~~~o~~do:!a~~epo:~ vember clectH~n. House as Judge of the Co~rt .of ple watched as the fine old b~ild- Of course what we know about it Appeals of th~ ~o.urth DlStr~ct ing with faiTy _ tale tun·ets and is exactly nothing as we have no ~~::i,os~ar~\a~~~g~~~·thw c~~o~~~ ~~i~~:d: ::l~;sr:pa:rtbl~r~;~t~i!~ :~~~ o~~r~~~~~~~~r:~ic~h:~~~~t~~~ and South Carolma. being done to those who levy the ious veil of the future and foretell If those who selected Sobel~ff exoTbitant taxes which caused this something that has not yet hap-for this job had searche~ the en- wanton destruction of property. pened. . tire country for a nommee who ·Maybe they'll get around to t11a:t, We are just as ignorant and ill-would be more distasteful to South- ~ __ _ _ prepared to prophesy as the pub-ern people than this South-hater, lie opinion pollsters and the politi-it would have been impossible to Muncie, Indiana, officials locked cal columnists who are always find one. Many Senators from the up the gates to their swimming eager to stick their neck out and States involved pled with their pools early in the summer and tip off the public about what the colleagues to turn Sobeloff down kept them locked because of the voters will do at the next election. but they paid not the slightest at- demand of Negroes to use them. tention and voted for his confirma- lt'was the first time Negroes had tion. ever tried to use the pools, accord· But we do have ideas on the subject and have never yet been known to refuse to put in our two cents worth concerning any sub­ject having to do with politics and we never let it be said that we fail to give our opinion .when asked. Al'\d so we submit our views for whatever, if anything, they are worth. Those who voted against confir­mation were: Byrd, Eastland, El­lender, Ervin, Frear, Hill, Holland, Jenner, Johnston of South Caro­lina, Long, McCarthy, McClellan, Robertson, Russell, Scott, Spark· man, Welker, Williams and Wof­ford. Those who were either absent or not voting but would have voted against the confirmation wert: Dan­iel, George and Stennis. While we are on the subject, we will give the names of the Sena­tors who voted against the confir­mation of Paul Hoffman, appointed by the White House to represent the United States in the United Nations. Hoffman has been one of the ramrods in the Fund for the Republic, an organization with a record since its organization of de­fending Communists: Barrett, Bricker, Bridges, Butler, Byrd, Curtis. Dirksen, Dworshak, East­land, Frear, Goldwater, Hruska, Jenner, Johnston of South Caro­lina, Langer, Malone, McCarthy, McLellan, Mundt, Schoeppel, Wof· ford Young. Those who were ab­sent'but would have voted against confirmation were: Daniel and Welker. Justice Department Enters local School Fight in Hoxie, Arkansas Immediately· following the San Francisco convention where Re-f: r~~c~~~~dd~~t m;:eu~~dle~; t~~! Federal government in trying to enforce the Supreme Court ruling on segregation, the J?epartment ?f Justice interfered m the Hoxte Arkansas, school wrangle where racial tension is already at a dan­gerous pitch. ing to the police chief theTe. Score up another victoTy for the fine "racial relations" which the Su­pTeme Court has fostered. Keeping up the record of FedeTal Judges in Tecent months in contributing -their s h a,. e to the administTatiOn's mong,·el­ization program, Judge Palme1· Hutchinson of Houston barged in to the me~ting of the American Bar Association at Dallas with a We think that Eisenhower will be elected for what, to us, seem valid reasons on which to base our" deductions: resolution which would h a v e There are more than a million called ]or enforcement of integra- · persons in this country and abroad tion by the Federal government. whom we will call active interna­He was turned down flat. tionalists. Of course, we have an- Behavior of Texas Voters Leaves Us Slightly Dizzy The po1itical situation in Texas, to put it mildly, is about as con­fused and contradictory as it is possible for the affairs of an American Commonwealth to be in this muddled world. In the first primary on July 28, Senator Price Daniel led the ticket in the race for governor by more than 165,000. In the same primary·Texans voted to keep segregation and against all forms of integration by an average-of three to one and in some cases, five to on~. Since Daniel's opponent in the run-off was Ralph Yarborough, a perennial candidate for the office and regarded as the voice of the CIO and the NAACP, the vote on integration by the people of the State provided Daniel with an effective and dynamic issue around which the great majority of Texans could be expected to rally. The issue was ready and waiting but Daniel ignored it and, for some reason beyond the power of most Texans to fathom, merely made token protest against integration. Perhaps it was the Washing­ton influence to which he was exposed for some tb._ree or four years and where a courageous and forthright expression on any issue is re­garded as little short of treason. At any rate he nosed Yarborough out by only three thousand votes, the narrowest margin by which a candidate for governor of Texas has been elected within memory, in the second primary on August 25. Between the first and second primaries when it became evident that Daniel was metely going to flirt with the segregation issue, most people lost interest and the campaign in the August run-off election was the dullest and most listless contest ever staged in the State. More than 200,000 TeXans who voted in the first primary didn't even go to the polls in August. - • These internationalists control not only the money of the world but have· a firm grasp on the po­litical, social, educational, labor and religious forces of the United States who think and act as a unit . toward the attainment of the over­all international objective. This objective, of course, is ulti­mate one-world government and the inclusion of the United States into this super-governing body ait­er its sovereignty has been grad· ually whittled away. Whether or not Mr. Eisenhower was sympathetic to the interna­tionalist cause before he became President, we wouldn't know but we do know from his actions and his public statements that he is an enthusiastic convert to their program now. During the past four years, he has advanced the internationalist p 1 an immeasur­ably and it is only reasonable to assume that he will take us fur­ther - if not all the way ·- to­ward a one-world government ii he is givert another .four years in office. By this we do not mean to imply for a moment that Adlai StCven­son would not become their cap­tive, if elected, because we are convinced that he would. He is so thoroughly embued with the Marxian philosophy, and so utter­ly lacking in understanding of, and sympathy for, the fundamen­t a l principJ s of t he American Re­public, that he would probably fall into the internationalist trap without waiting to be pushed, just like over-ripe fruit from the limb of a persimmon tree• But Eisenhower has four years' advantage of him in experience, in international contacts and indoc­trination which makes him far more valuable to one-world plan­ners than Stevenson who W"Uul~ have to be educated from scratc.:h, and initiated into all the intricate and complicated m e t h o d s by which a great nation is dismantled and gradually welded into a larg­er world super-state. Because these internationalist forces are all-powerful and be­cause their influence extends all the way down into every unit of organized human activity, we be­lieve that they will elect the can­didate of th eir choice and that their choice is Mr. Eisenhower. Of course the election returns can make a fool out of us as they have done many times in the case of far wiser persons than we, but this is the way we see the situa­tion. The Justice Department called on the United States Court of Ap­peals to prevent citizens of that small town from trying to keep segregation in effect an_q to allo~v integrationists to contmue the1r program to mix 25 Negro children with 1,000 white school children of Hoxie. The power of the Justice De­partment was aligned with the 25 Negroes, leaving the 1,000 white students unrepresented except by To make the affair more weird, W. Lee O'Daniel,-former governor ... and United States senator ~ho received some quarter of a million votes in the first primary and who has a strong following among rural voters, came out at the last minute and ask~d his supporters to vote in the second primary for Ralph Yarborough on the ground that Yar­borough was the weakest candidate and promised that he, O'Daniel, would make the race as an Independent in November and beat Yar­borough, thereby insuring the election of a strong segregationist as governor of the State. The anti-States Rights liberals are now clamoring for the <~uni­fication" of traffic laws through· out the United States in prepara­tion for the proposed Federal sys­tem of highways which Eisenhow­eT asked for and got out of the last Congress. Harry Hopkins was the fi1·st one to suggest the build­ing of a highway system to cover aU the States. He made the sug­gestion to Roosevelt as one of the vaTious ways in which he could get his clutches on the States. For, of course, when the thing is start­ed the Federal boys will -be right in t here setting prices and bossing the job generally. ~~:1 h~e~J~z::n~e;'h~~~t i~0~~~~= tinued segregation. It is believed by many that this case is · only one of several similar. instances in which action will be taken between now and the elec­tion by the attorney general in attempts to influence Negro votes. Apparently the majority of his followers t.ook him seriously and voted in large numbers for Yarborough although the legality of a candidate making the race in July as a Democrat and as an Independent in November has been seriously questioned in some quarters. About the only thing which has been proved by the whole pro­ceeding is that the leftists are going to have to get themselves some new material next time since Yarborough has been an unsuccssful contender for the office in five different primaries and that is way above par for the course even in TexSJ,s where we are accused of doing t~ings en a big scale. the that trol ·orld po­abor 1ited unit . ulti­and atcs aft­rad- •me but and reir oast the ;ur­! to fur­to­t if in ln­,1~ :.:h, He by ed g-ist )C­all of n­at rs ey se ut ls ~= s- ,o.­lS ~- g­' f"d ~: t g September, 195b THE SOUTHERN CONSERVATIVE Page7 Anyone Wanting the Low-Down Will Form a Line to the Left From the Christian Century, perhaps the pinkest of many pink church publications in this coun­try, it is learned that the New England Methodist Conference meeting in Malden, Massachu­setts, recentlY went a step furth­er into extracurricular 1 activities than has been taken in- all pre­vious history of that denomina­tion. It was decided at this Confer­ence that "planned parenthood is a Christian responsibility" and a resolution passed at the gathering advised Methodist ministers to '·make information on planned parenthood available to parishion­ers'' and "to advise people where to secure birth control informa­tion.'' Whether the good men of the Cloth will openly discuss the sub­ject during their Sunday morning sermon or slip the information to their worshippers privately as they file out the door following the singing of the Doxology, was not made clear in the Century's discussion of the matter. In other resolutions, the Con­ference demanded mixing of Ne- . groes and white people ~'in ALL areo.s of society,'' denounced the right-to.-work laws of the several States, urged that money given away to foreign countries be dis­tributed through the United Na­tions and called for the emascula­tion of the McCarren-Walter im­migration law which was pa~ed in the interest of the national secur­ity of this country. Admission of Red Chjna to the United Nations was strongly ap­proved in a heated debate on the subject, but official approval of this step was defeated. Nothing of a religious nature was discussed at the Conference apparently as there was no men­tion of it in the record of the }1ro­ceedings appearing in the Cen­tury. ---~----- Communist Frontier In NAACP Agitates For Racial Mixing Dr. W. T. White. Superintendent of the Daiias Public Schools has taken a very firm and commendable position in regard to the matter of segregation. Dallas schools, he announcf'd, would · continue segregated as before during the 1956~57 terms. Beyond that, he had nothing to say. The position of Dallas school offi­cials has been made difficult because of the activities of a Negro represent­ing the. NAACP there, one U. Simpson Tate, who, Jitie the rest of the Ne­groes and white trash composing that organidhon, has sought court action to force integration in many parts of the South. Only in one large Texas city, however, has any progress been made in this respect and that is the­extremely "liberal" city or San An­tonio, where some schools have ac­cepted the mongrelization program. U. Simpson Tate, the Negro attor­ney for the NAACP at Dallas, is named on page 626 Vol. 1 of the Special Committee on un-Amcrican Activities, 1938-"fnvestigation of Un­Amel'ican Activities in the Pnited States" - as having been· national treasurer of the Nationa! Negro Con­gress at one time, which was cited as Communist and subversive by the At­torney General of the United States . "World Goodwill" Outfit Makes Threats Against Future of U. S. There is not muCh heard of an outfit called "World Goodwill" be­cause it has not been publicised as much as some other one-wor:d or­ganizations whose p1·opaganda is cluttering up the mail and the communications media of all na­tions. But the "World Goodwill" group is one of the most £ubtle and dangerous of alL It has headquarters in Lond01l, New York and, of course, Geneva which is a hotoed of world move­ments and where it is eventually planned to locate the head of the one-wor.ld government. Although this World Goodwill has been putting out literature for several years, it ha's only now be­gun the issuance of a regular bulle­tin, volume 1 and number 1 of which has just been issued. - It is characteristic of the trash they put out that no names are ever shown, and it is virtually im­possible to pin down the identity of its sponsors with the exception of one Ian Gordon-Bro.wn of Lon­don who signed a letter sent out in August soliciting funds. Two typical paragraphs from their bulletin carry a veiled threat against those who might protest against world government and implies the futility of "ignor­ant and useless resistance" just as the people of the United Stales have it hammered..into their heads that "ignorant and u-;eless resist­ance" will get them nowhere in connection with the Supreme Court's assault on the Amedcan Constitution. Here is a typical "gem" from the World Goodwill bulletin: "The Twentieth Century has been aptly characterized 'the century of change'. Some people still mourn the passing of 'the good old days' and try to resist the swift current of ~;oe~ts t~~vesei/~~ganiSe:mf~:£- able anchorage of familiar cus­tom. The uncertainty and the adventurous challenge of the future for whic~ the experi­ments of today are a tempor­ary phase of preparation, ex­cite a sense of expectancy in some of us and of foreboding in others. ''Nevertheless this individ­ual reaction is relatively un­important because whether we like it or not there is no blind­ing our eyes to the fact that humanity stands on the thresh­old of a new age. We have the choice.. of cooperating intelli­gently and skillfully in the birth of the new day so that it may dawn in beauty, or of sticking in our toes and rais­ing a dust cloud of ignorance and useless resistance. We shall be in spite of ourselves 'carried kicking and scream­ing into the new age' as Mr. Adlai Stevenson is reported to have said on a recent occa­sion". This last paragraph should be read over and over again. Certain­ly some interest will be stimulat­ed in the citizen's mind as to who is back of all these threats that are constantly being made against the American people. And where does 'Low Mentality Groups' Damctge U. S. Abroad, But Race Can't Be Named Book That Reflects No Credit On Its Author General Telford Taylor's book "The Grand Inquest" is devoted to condemnation of investigating committees of Congress and to se­curity measures which have been passed for the protection of the Republic. No one will question General Taylor's right to author such a book but there must be many who challenge his judgment and his wisdom in issuing a volume which can only give aid and comfort to the enemy. The "Grand Inquest" is further verification and vindication of charges made by Senator Joseph R. McCarthy..._ of Wisconsin con­cerning sympathy for the Com­munist cause on the part of Ameri­cans in high places in t)le govern­ment, in the Army and in defense plants. The announcement by the Con­stitution Party, preceding its Fort Wo1·th meeting on August 27th that Mary Cain of Missis­sippi would make a k e y no t e s p e e c h of its convention was s u p e r f l u o u s infon-nation. Any speech the brilLiant Mary Cain makes is a "Key-note ad­dress," no matter the place, the subject or the occasion. (From Charlestcn, S.C. News and Courier) The Protest o! Gen. Hock s. Europe­an commander 6f the U. S. Army, against sending "low mentality groups'' to foreign milital'y SC'rvi:e is national news or first importance. It is n·ews that we fear will not reach, with its full irflplications_ the bulk of the American people. The facts, how­ever, will be exploited to their full \vorth by the enemies or our country. For the lruth is that in m:1ny parts or the world the people mean it when t)ley say, "Yankee . .!0 home." One of the reasons why our coun-try is earning more -hatred 1 han lO\'e is thut foreign troops arc n('ver wel­come indefinitely. Whethe1· they a1·e occupying armies among {'onquercd peoples, as in Japan and G~rmany, or poli::e garrisons as in I:-:•\;md and scores of other places in the world, .. ~ sooner or later they ar{' intensC'ly un-welcome. This historic distaste ror foreig:n troops is even more acute when r:t­cial differences are added. Gen. Hodes' protest that some of the men assigned overseas are u'nfil to represent their country apparently made no reference to race. In view of the integration orders from the Su· preme Commander in the White Ho~sc. he hardly cou ld have men~ tioned it. The subje:t is in the spotlight as a result oi -indignation over a gang~ rape in Bamberg, Germany. Seven There is much agitation on the American soldiers are charged with part of the Texas League of Wom- assaulting a girl of 15. All seven are en Voters for re-writing the Con- Negroes. stitution of the State. We don't know what they have in mind Reports have been current for some and they probably don't either. time that A~eriea~ troops have be­They just want to change it, but haved ba~ly m fore~gn place~. Not all in our 1mmble opinion we should of the crrmes of course are commit~ let it alone. Only God knows what • ted by Negro_ t:oops. The Army docs would happen if we turned poli- not k_ee~ stat1sbcs _by race and ther~­ticians Loose to shape a new Con- f~re 1t 1s ;10t poss1~Ie_ to get ~n ofr1. stitution acco1·ding to their ideas. C1al statement._ StatJsb.cs on cnme_ by We only know that Reds would race ·are avatlable m the Un~ted hon1. in on the act and take over. States, however. They show plamly that Negroes commit fn more than "A1n.e1·ican Communists have annour~ced that they stand on a platform of 1jobs, peace, equal 1·ights, and democracy.' But they omit the two most important wo1·ds - 1Moscow style,, When ~~::n;:7~n~n~~il:~1.~k isb~~~n~a!~ 1·ight now, we would be well ad­vised to refocus our sights. Behind those changing :;pots, the same bad blood stiU flows through the leap­ard's veins."- J. Edgar Hoover. Addled Adlai, whom they quote, come in? He's not in the White House yet and it would seem to be time enough to start this one world propaganda after he is safe­ly elected. From the above statements, those leading the World Goodwill outfit would appear to be fools and crackpots and they are, but they can't be dismissed lightly for we cannot deny that fools and crackpots are the leaders today and are shaping national and world policies. And what a happy thought that a nest of internationalist degener­ates in London is circularizing the world with threats against the f1t­ture of the American people and of the American Republic. lheir share. ' Would it be surprising if Negro troops have a similar rf'cord overseas? The United States should not permit Negro troops to be billeted in all~white countries. But national policy forbids segregation in the (lrmed forces. Seg­regation, we hqve been told, supplies bad propaganda. Yet the American commander in Europe calls for s<>g:re­gation of his troops from "low men­tality groups." Juggling of words to avoid reference to race can't hide the truth forever. We know no~hing, and ca1·e less about the game of golf but we have a deep and profound 1·espect for Babe Zaharias whose gallant spirit as she fights for her life in a Galveston hospital has won for her the adm..iTation and sympathy of aU Americans. The tvo1·ld of sport has been made cleaner and finer by her participation in it. On a business trip to the West in August, we spent one delight­ful day in Denver, one of our favorite cities. We w e r e enter­tained at luncheon at the Brown Palace by Mr. and Mrs. Leon V. Almirall . . later we had a won­derful visit with two of our favor­ite cousins, Olive Yates Coy and Helen Logue. PageS THE SOUTHERN CONSERVATIVE September, 1956 The Most Arrant Example of Way to Ge"t Secret and Classified Negroes Trip Themselves Up H~~:".b~~~t:c~;:o::s~i:!o::. Information Is to P'ay Five Bucks lnA~~~~~~~t~~.~P~~0o~ ~!:u:.Y ~aar~f:: 0~11bott~e th;e~~J~~~~ol~~~~~ The people of the American Republic were properly shocked in ~~~~ni~~c a~~~~:te~se:r ~Xte~~~= ;[~~ke~f a~~i~~erjfi~~~i~!se!a;uess~ ~~~~~m~i~r i;f9a5~~:Sh~~~~~f~e T~~:~ni:Z~~i~=t~~~~l;i~1~ ~~~lt:o~s~~~t~~~ ~~~~e \~f:ct~~~o~·~e~e~~s. the recent ;~rc:~~f;Y c~~~eo;t~~~aste~h:r t~~;~ f~itthu~ ar~11a~:~:;~~=a:1;~e~;~h~f :~ed!~~e;a~v~~~ei~~~r~;·ti~~iss~~~fJ In one all-Negro voting box in ~~~~::~~i~o~t~;~t!~~~\~~e ·~I- :: =~~~Jl:£lf~!1~ft:n~;!~;0s~~~;~;;i;;:~~~e;~:~;:,;~g~;~;,~~;~~ gi~~E~i~~:;f£~~~7lo~~it~! Nothing was more obvious that the sole concern of each was in corraling Negro votes than the fa­cility with which each party changed and amended and shifted its plank on the subject in order to avoid offense to one section while, at the same time, carefully taking into account the danger of alienating the voters in another ~~~~ ~i~~it~h= :~~~~w;~~~ ~o~~~ tion that commanded no respect from decent white people and stir­red no enthusiasm among self­respecting blacks. This is the inevitable outcome when political weaklings and in­competents who aspire to national leadership assume the prerogative of taking up and disposing of mat­ters which do not properly come within the jurisdiction of Federal authorities. The Tenth amendment to the Constitution specifically re­served to the States all powers not delegated to the Federal gov­ernment and by no stretch of the imagination did the Constitution delegate to Washingt~n the. a':l­thority over the Amencan pubhc school systems, swimming pools, golf links or other e~ucational . or recreational centers 1 n t o wb1ch the Supreme Court is now at­tempting to come pharging and t~row _its weight around. Here is the way and the Gnly way in which this strictly non­governmental subject of Civil Rights became injected into Ame~­ican political campaigns where 1t is now serving the purposes of gimlet-headed politicians in their "Smbitious attempts to have, or to hold, public office: MoScow Communists, ever on the alert for trouble-raising issues which would promote Communism throughout the world, hit on the idea of stirring up illiterate South­ern Negroes on the ground that they were being discriminated against and that their "civil rights" were being violated Roosevelt who was always a sucker for any social experiment, no matter how outlandish, far­fetched or bizarre, fell right in with the plan to foment discontent among colored people of the South. It proved effective and diverted many votes to the Demo­crats which had traditionally gone to the Republicans. Truman em­ployed the same cheap, scurvy and disgusting tactics which further cemented the colored vote to the Democratic Party. When Eisenhower came to pow­er with his promises of a "change" and his avowed intention of halt­ing corruption and cleaning up the mess, he took a second look and decided that this potential source of votes was worth further exploi­tation. Accordingly he has worked the racket more thoroughly than hhiass prfeindaelcleys soarpsp eevaererd i ntwenildliendg antod wreck the Constitution in order twoh ihchar vtehsist efiveeldr y pproovsisdibelse. ballot as to the activities of the government, was unquestioned, and accepted as a matter of course. Truman had been faced with some embarrassing investig~tions involving the loyalty of highly-placed government. personnel such as Alger Hiss, Han-y Dexter \Vhite, William Remington and others which had evoked the President's notorious "red herring" statements. With the spite and vindictiveness which were, and are, the outstanding traits in Truman's character, he retaliated by issuing the Censorship order. When "the change" came in 1952, it was confidently believed that this order would be rescinded and that the Congress and the American people would once again be given all legitimate information, and especi­ally in peacetime, to which the citizens in a free Republic are entitled. However, Mr. Eisenhower did not only not see fit to rescind this cen-f~ fte~i~i~;~t~rd ~~\~!sS:~re~~~Y 0~f ~~f~:S~ ::;~dg ~~Y A;~Y~:c~a~~h; hearings in which he said: "You will instruct employees of your De­partment that in all their appea~ances bef?re it (Army-McCarthy hearings) they are not to testify". Smce that tlme, according to Senate document 2621, Report of the Committee on Government Operations, page 31, more than twenty government agenci~s and departments have cited this letter as their grounds for refusing information to Congress. Meantime, the American people have become more or less used to the semi-slave status in which they find themselves and in which they are not allowed any information concerning the activities of their government except such censored data as the executive department and its agencies may dole out, although members of the Congress have never ceased to vigorously protest the refusal of information to them which i~ necessary in diScharging their legislative responsibilities. It was, therefore, with much the same shocked amazement that would attend the dropping of an atomic bomb, that members -Of the Congress and the American people received the startling information t~at a newspaper man had been turned loose to graze among the secret flies and documents which have so long been withheld and that this newspaper man, Robert J . Donovan had incorporated this information in a book called "The Inside Story". Senator John L. Mcclellan is Chairman of t e Permanent Subcom­mittee on Investigations of the Committee on Government Operations. which committee had tried in vain to get vital information from the Execu~ive Depart~ent in connection with a series 6f hearings which it had been conductmg into the matter of East-West trade and the down~ grading and de-control of strategic goods which NATO countries were being permitted to shift to European Communist bloc countries. The attitude of the majority of the members of this committee was expressed in this statement by Chairman McClellan on Page 556 of the Report on hearings on East-West Trade, part 3: "It is something novel in my experience that a Senator-ial or Con­gressional committee charged with the duty and responsibility of study­ing the government at all levels can be denied government documents, memoranda and material which is on file in the executive branch of the government on the grounds that it is confidential; documents that are certainly at a lower level than the minutes of Cabinet proceedings and then find that the minutes of Cabinet proceedings which are secret and confidential, can be made available for public use, for private enterprise, and for profit and gain to some individuaL It presents a rather shocking situation to the Chair". Chairman McClellan immediately dispatched a letter to Maxwell Rabb (formerly Rabinowitz), Secretary of the Cabinet in which he told him it was difficult to understand why confidential information had been given to an outsider which had repeatedly been refused to commit­tees of the Congress. Senator McClellan respectfully asked Rabb to appear before his Committee and testify concerning the matter. With typical arrogance of the little man in a big job, Rabb curtly >eplied to Senator McClellan telling him that he knew nothing about ttehset ifmy.a tter and, relying on Eisenhower 's censorship rule, refused to Meantime, it is reported that Donovan is getting rich on the sale of his books at five dollars each, and that his new job as a peddler of secret, inside information from government files is proving so prqf\l:able that he may retire from his profession as an active newspaper correspondent. On the jacket of the book, Donovan openly brags that: "For the first time in our history an administration while still in office has permitted a distinguished journalist (Gad, how he hates himself.-Editor) to com­pile an authentic, independent account of its conduct of affairs of state. In this sense this book is an inside story of Eisenhower in the White House. Here is a wealth of new and unpublished information obtained through access to Cabinet officers, key men and other sources. The book reveals much about the President and his associates; it also shows how great decisions were reached and describes the intimate workings of the White House". Since we are an avid seeker of information-inside or otherwise­on the behavior of Washington politicians, we dug down in our jeans and gave up five dollars for the book containing 422 pages of "inside information" and while we, with all our other responsibilities, have only made a very perfunctory examination of it, we find that there is one very significant piece of "inside information" which Mr. Donovan omitted and that is: "Who promoted Peress"? State laws specify that the name of each voter shall be cnteted on the list at the time he receives his ballot and marks it. Of course voters do not come to the polls in alphabetical order so there was something obviously wrong. A poll of those whose names were turned in by the precinct chairman in this all-Negro box showed that many of them were ill, out of' the State, or for other rea­sons did not vote. The frightened Negro woman who was election judge for the controversial box refused to com­ment other than to repeat what she had been told to say: "Returns from that box are valid". The matter is in the hands o[ the Grand Jury and they will no doubt deal leniently with the Ne­groes The real culprit is probably some whi.te scoundrel who put them up to the crookedness. He forgot to instruct them ;>roperly and of course they know nothing of the law on the subject and thoroughly messed up the attempt to stuff the box. The box which cast 656 votes in the first primary reported 1060 in the last Ql'jma1·y_,. with.- lC34.. for Yarborough the NAACP can­didate, an,d 26 for Price Daniel. The1·e is nothing that infuriate~ us like having someone refer to the United States as a "Democ­racy." Heretofore, we have at .. tributed such errors to ignorance but apparently that is not the an­swer. At San Francisco Mr. Eisen­hower called the United States a "Democracy" and certainly he is not ignorant. We can only assume that his designation of the Re­public as a "Democracy·· was de­liberate. Westb1·ook Pegle1· who can hit the naiL on the h€ad a hundred times out of a hundred sums up the two recent politi.cal conven­tions in this manne1·: '1The truth of this year's Democratic and Re­publican Conventions has eluded the whole nation. The truth is that both the Democratic and Re­publican parties are Socialistic and are merely two rival gangs of fakers, both completely hostile t.o the ConstitUtion because it pro­vided plain impediments to their treacheries." THAT"LL BE THE Dh: When American tax payers get full up to the gullet with the deceit, hyp4 oc1·isy, double-crossing, four-flush­ing and treachery of the Fair DeaL Democrats and the Fair Deal Re~ publicans and band themselves to­gether to put an American of in­teg1 ·ity, common sense and admin­istTative ability in the White House. He doesn't need to be a statesman even; we have learned to get along without statesman­ship. If only he is possessed of horse sense and patriotism jo1· the United States. rather than loyalty to the United Nations, he would bring back hope for the restora­tion of Constitutional government.
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