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The Southern Conservative, Vol. 11, No. 10, October 1960
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The Southern Conservative, Vol. 11, No. 10, October 1960 - File 001. 1960-10. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 16, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/southern/item/677/show/668.

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(1960-10). The Southern Conservative, Vol. 11, No. 10, October 1960 - File 001. The Southern Conservative. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/southern/item/677/show/668

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The Southern Conservative, Vol. 11, No. 10, October 1960 - File 001, 1960-10, The Southern Conservative, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 16, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/southern/item/677/show/668.

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Title The Southern Conservative, Vol. 11, No. 10, October 1960
Contributor
  • Darden, Ida M.
Publisher Southern Conservative
Date October 1960
Language English
Subject
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
Place
  • Fort Worth, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 10604411
Collection
  • Houston Metropolitan Research Center
  • Ida M. Darden Collection
  • The Southern Conservative
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Houston Metropolitan Research Center.
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript THE SOUTHERN UONSERVATIVEI -To Plead for a Return of Constitutional Government- Vol. II FORT WORTH, TEXAS, OCTOBER, 1960 NO. 10 History Repeats Itself And, We Must Again Decide Which Is The 'Least Of Two Evils' These Old Boys Could Have Given Even Kennedy and Nixon Some Good Tips On 'Social Justice' Looking over old files of our paper and thinking about national political conventions, we fell to wondering whatever became of the group known as the Organized Hoboes of America, Inc., who used to also hold national conventions, adopt a platform and put up candidates for office. The last one we heard of occurred in 1956 and was held in Britt, Iowa, along about the same time the Democrats and Republicans were holding their nominating conventions at Chicago and San Francisco. At the time these wayfaring gentlemen were holding forth in Iowa, we wrote an editorial on their gathering as follows: While the Democrats at Chicago and the Republicans at San Fran~ c sco were ma ing vague and ambiguous promises to do everything for everybody and were shaping hazy and indistinct platforms on which to run for office, another national convention was being held which left no doubt where its candidates stood. This was the National Convention of the Organized Hoboes of America, Inc. held in Britt, Iowa, August 2i and which attracted some 20,000 knights of the road all of whom are loyal, if not paid up, members of the National Tourists Union. Candidates put in nomination for the office of King of Hoboes were Scoop Shovel Scotty, veteran hitchhiker on the American highways, and Hobo Benson whose extensive coverage of the United States has been made by the more luxurious mode of travel known as rid ing the rods or a freight train. · While the Champagne, Scotch and Bourbon which inundated Chicago and San Francisco delegates was understandably missing from the Iowa menu, the absence of these stimulating refreshments was partially com~ pensated for by the presence of a large pot of Mulligan stew which graced the festive board of the men of the open road. The platform as it was finally adopted is believed to represent the greatest and most powerful demand for social justice since William Jennings Bryan made his "Cross of Gold'' speech. It calls for a maximum of four hours of work a day, four days of work a week, a three months' paid vacation in summer and the revision of all welfare laws so as to provide $100 per month for all persons who have been deprived, either by nature or the Federal Unemployment Com­pensation Act, of all desire to participate in any form of physical labor. It urges the picketing by accredited members of the guild, of the back doors of private homes in all cases where a free handout has either been refused or does not measure up in quality or quantity to the specifi· cations of accepted Hobo standards. Looking toward a long range program whose objective is to pro­vide more time for leisurely contemplation and restful relaxation on the part of tired humanity, the platform calls for all self-respecting and re­sponsible Hoboes to gird their loins for a big push on Congress in the interest of the passage of "Right·Not·To·Work" legislation and the adop· 1tion by the administration in power of a domestic policy which will guar­antee all Americans "freedom from toil." The only deviation from regular political convention proceedings was the decision of the body to by-pass the outmoded custom of select­ing the winning candidates by vote of State delegations and to settle the matter by an open and above-board slugging match between the two contestants. This rule was unanimously adopted and the proceedings came to an abrupt end, along with Scoop Shovel Scotty's aspirations for public office, as a haymaker from Hobo Benson knocked him off the platform and out of the race. For our lead editorial this month we are reaching back four years and reproducing the one which appeared in this publi· cation in September, 1956. This will confirm the tragic fact that the caliber of leadership oHered the American people during each Presidential campaign is steadily deteriorating and party platforms more brazenly reflecting the degrading philosophy of National Socialism. As between 1956 and 1960 · only the names are changed. Substitute that of Richard M. Nixon for Dwight D. Eisenhower and John F. Kennedy for Adlai Stevenson and the story of the gradual perversion of the American governing system is brought up to date. -Editor Fair Deal Democrats and Fair Deal Republicans have held their national conventions at Chicago and Son Francisco, respectively. Where once the deliberation, discussions and conclusions of suc.h conclaves hinqed around defense of the Constitution, exaltation of the Free Enterprise system and recognition of the rights of Sovereign States to handle their own aHairs, no word was spoken and no line written in the Windy City or in the metropolis by the Golden Gate re­aHirming these beliefs in the basic institutions and govern­ing processes of the American Republic. Impartially, both gatherings demonstrated that a Presidential nominating convention is merely an occasion for the maximum exercise of human vocal organs and minimum utilization of human brains. Never were so many words employed by so many speakers to say so little in behalf of anything worth while , . . Meantime all that long-suffering taxpayers can look forward to during the forthcoming campaign is a spirited battle between two dedicated left-wing internationalists. It will not be a fight for the restoration of Constitutional gov· ernment; for the preservation of American sovereignty against attempts by alien conspirators to destroy it; for the reclamation of lost American prestige throughout the world; for the maintenance of the rights, freedom and welfare of the American people in all areas and sections of the land but rather a life and death struggle for possession of the key to the front door of the White House which both candidates feel is in the keeping of Negro voters and other minority groups. Neither at Chicago nor San Francisco was there any indication that the administration of the Federal government under the provisions of the Constitution-rather than under the rules of psychology or the Com~ munist Manifesto-is to be made an issue of the campaign. No planks were adopted at either place which are not already familiar to the American people from first having appeared in the Social· ist platform before the policies of that party were absorbed by the Demo~ cratic and Republican organizations which presently constitute our so­called two-party system. Also it is notable that no speeches were made and nothing said at either convention, with two exceptions, that could be classed as a great and outstanding pronouncement such as those once heard at official gatherings of the nation's leaders and party chiefs. The first exception was the r.'lasterly challenge which Georgia's Governor, the Honorable Marvin Griffin, hurled at the closing session in (Continued one Page 21 Millions of Americans Think it - The Southern Conservative Says It Page 2 THE SOUTHERN CONSERVATIVE October, 1960 In Other Days Eaton Would !-fave History Repeats (f~o;t~:~:d1 ) I Been Condemned As A Traator Chicago in which he vigorously protested the total disregard of parlla- In spite of the fact that the in- Constitutional Government went by mentary rules and the denial of prerogatives to duly elected delegates ternational bandit, assassin and the board and when loyalty to and in which he roundly scored them for the failure of any speaker to mortal enemy of the United States, country came next to loyalty to even mention Constitutional Government and the Rights of Sovereign Nikita Khrushchev, was banned God and to family. States. from circulating in this country But so lightly is allegiance held The second exception was the brave effort of former President Her-wh~ le atten?mg the sesswns of_ the now that not only was Eaton's bert Hoover who made a gallant, but futile, attempt at San Francisco to Umted Nations and was confmed depraved performance accepted by point the course of the Republican Party back toward .its original objec .. to the New York area under heavy the public with a smile and a shrug, tives when he said: police guard, he got the red carpet but some 200 other degenerate · "If you here calculate what will please this or that minor segment t~eatment ~n~ay whtch wtll serve Amencans an? Canadtans sat down of our population and satisfy this or that pressure group or sectional htf!i well m hts propaganda cam- at the L"!culhan feast and la~ped interest, you will be betraying your opportunity and tragically missing patgn throughout the world. up the nch .foo? and rare wmes the call of your time. Today the greatest issue in America and all man~ A 76-year old character from even as ~ey tmbtbed the Red prop- kind is the encroachment of government to master our lives. If you Cleveland, Ohio, named Cyrus aganda dtshed out by the guest of temporize with Socialism, in any of its disguises, you will stimulate Eaton, entertained him at a lunch- honor. its growth and make certain the defeat of free men.'' eon at the Biltmore Hotel in New Eaton has been variously de- The convention cheered him lustily and went right ahead with its York and so great was his admira- scribed in terms ranging all the purpose of "pleasing minor segments of our population, satisfying pres .. tion for the Bolshevik dictator and way from that of a senile old goat sure groups and temporizing with Socialism to make certain the defeat so strong his desire to pay honor who has no conception of the ef· of free men." to the Soviet monster that he pulled fects of his overt acts on the tense There was only a single Instance during the Chicago and the San out all the stops and went the limit situation now prevailing between Francisco sessions where human ingenuity, resourcefulness and inspired in lavish hospitality. According to the Soviet Union and the United imagination caused the achievements of one gathering to soar above the the press, the table service was States on down to an outright sym- accomplishments of the other and that was when California's Governor, glittering fourteen·carat gold "from pathizer with Communist ideology Goodie Knight, gave a blow-out that made the shindig which Perle Mesta the plates down to the butter- as opposed to the Capitalistic sys- threw in Chicago look like an ice cream social at a country church. kn~e::: used to be a word for be- ~~~ ;;rJ~~t ':;~~=m~~m rich beyond with ~~l~~:[!~t~i!~da~~e~~~l~~~:~l~~~~c~;;h?~uf~st~! ~~~~~~:t~!~ havior like that and the word was bei~es~~:i:~~n;~~mc~~~~~ c~~~:~ ~~~eb~~~wc~:~~:~~in~~~~ s~~!e~1:·i~~~:~~e~o ru~~t~n~ t;~ ~ggs~:e~~ ~i~nuf;~a~:~ J'a~~ 0~i7~ ~e 3c~~~~: eating relations between the two loaders who fought, scratched and clawed their way into her swank tution of the United States which countries by his obvious partiality soiree, Goodie is reported to have provided such quantities ot the spark· describes the giving of aid and com- to this country's number one ene· ling giggle juice that his 10,000 guzzling guests finally wound up with fort to the enemy as an act of trea- my. the stuff practically oozing out of their ears. son against the Republic for which In the latter case, and if he is in After all, the prestige of the party in power must be maintained and drastic punishment is prescribed. ~~~uf~s~~ss;~~d 0~0h~s :~~~1~~~· f~~ ~~e ~~~~ i~:inn::u~c;!!~~ ~=~: ~~~:[~g~h~o~:~~de\~~:~~P:~~;' s~~~ But that of course was before his offense. advantage to the opposition. Otherwise the two conventions were much alike and with no dis .. World Court To Get Six Several Exhilarating Days ~~;~~~h:~~o~":~~;~~ :hb~c~~~ oan:d a&~~;~~~\~ht~eo~~~ ~~~~cV:ai~ ';~~ New Members In february High In The T nn ee Sky ~~~~s~~1at;::,~dtha~ ;:~l~e ';h~~h a~·:ue.:'it~~.~~.th auditoriums was so Those who are trying so hard to rob this country of its sove­reignty and transfer this sacred heritage to the United Nations World Court are probably interest­ed in the fact that six new mem­bers of the Court are to be named next February, five to replace those whose terms expire and one to take the place of a member who died. After all, those who believe that alien judges should be given author· ity to pass on questions relating to the domestic affairs of the United States no doubt also believe that the more the merrier and that the more foreign legal luminaries who get a whack at us, the quicker we will be whipped into line in our obedience to a One-World power. The five new replacements for those whose terms expire will come from Uruguay, Norway, Pakistan, the United States and the Soviet Union. The member to replace the one who died will come from Great Britain. Here are a few names picked at random from the fifteen judges who presently comprise the Court: Judge Badawi, Judge Spirapoulos, Judge Basdevant, Judge Ugon, Judge Klaestad, Jugge Alfaro and Judge Kojevnikov. _, With names like that, we should probably be assured that domestic affairs affecting the Interests of the people of Mississippi; Arkansas, Utah, Maine, Missouri and all the other States of the American Union would be in safe hands and that problems involving our national welfare entrusted to the Court would be resolved in accordance with the Constitution of the United States and with established tradi· tions of the American Republic. Maybe we should be, but we're We did not have a regular vaca- Both heavily emphasized the 'give-away" motif and tried to out· tion this past summer and stayed promise each other in the matter of generosity with taxpayers' money on the job in the almost unbear- and in conferring benefits on a pan11andling public which sees nothing able Texas heat of July and August. degrading in accepting Federal hand·outs. However, we were more than compensated by the privilege of a long week end late in September with friends at their fabulous and indescribably beautiful summer home atop one of the great Smoky Mountains directly adjoining the Smoky Mountain National Park near Gatlinburg, Tennessee. We are still somewhat groggy and up in the air from drinking in all the natural and man-made beauty of this earthly paradise high up in the clouds and from the grand hospitality of those wonderful Ten· nessee friends which probably ac­counts for the oaper being a little late this month. Our enjoyment of this brief va­cation was enhanced by the fact that it was from the great State of Tennessee that our father was named to West Point by a con­gressman of the Volunteer State. That was in the days when it was an outstanding honor to be so chos­en and when such a thing as divid­ed loyalty was unknown among the men of that great military institu­tion who would have regarded as rank treason the suggestion of some of its products of today that the United States abandon its sovereignty and lose its identity in an a1ien-inspired One-World Gov­ernment. not, and any American with a drop of loyal blood in his veins will fight to the last ditch against betrayal by those who favor repeal of the Connally amendment. Bold bids were made by both conventions for the support of special classes and voting blocs such as farm groups, labor unions and racial minorities but there was no balm in Gilead for the millions of sound, conservative Americans in this country, including 58,000,000 qualified voters who failed, or refused, to vote for either Stevenson or Eisenhower in 1952. It is a fundamental right of the American people to have two candi .. dates for President who represent opposite ideologies and in these peril ... ous times with the future of the Republic hanging in the balance, it Is doubly essential that we have this privilege. We should be able to choose between a candidate who believes In Constitutional Government without equivocation or exception; one who boldly denounces corruption in government including infiltration of Com .. munists or domination by labor unions or any other group or class; one who is unalterably opposed to Socialism as embodied in the United Nations and who is alert to the danger to our Sovereignty by any pow .. erful world group; one who is outspoken in defense of the Rights of the States to conduct their internal affairs including their social customs, employment practices and any other rights and freedoms granted to them by the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution. We should, on the other hand, have the chance to vote for a candi .. date who represents the opposite principles and who advocates outright Socialism as practiced in this country for more than twenty years. ' This privilege, however, is not to be granted us for both candidates hold such similar views on most vital issues that they had as well be cross-filed on both tickets. Texas Elector Refuses to Pledge Support to Kennedy The difference between Richard Nixon and Jack Kennedy is about the same as the difference between tripe and chitlins, says Judge George Charlton of Tomball, Texas, who added, "! don't like either!' Judge Charlton's remarks were in answer to newsmen who queried him on television recently as to which candidate for President he would support. The judge was an elector from Texas but with simple honesty and straightforwardness which is rare in these days, he told the Demo· cratic Convention of Texas that he would not support Kennedy and that was that. The veteran attorney was imme .. diately replaced with a man who promised to go all the way with JFK and LBJ. Judge Charlton, who was taking active part in real Democratic con .. ventions before many of the little squirts now in charge of the party in Texas were born, couldn't care less that he was dropped from the job and a figurehead put in his place. He is still a Democrat in the real meaning of the term. o. G., ol OJ c tl P' fl Jc ft sl lli n; ti Jc t< rl fl "' ,, October, 1960 THE SOUTHERN CONSERVATIVE Page l Governor of Texas Achieves Questionable 'Victory' At State Democratic Convention We have attended many Democratic conventions in our native State of Texas throughout the years. We can even remember when these conventions were conducted by Democrats; when there was not a fellow traveler in the lot and when Socialists were people who spouted forth from soap boxes in the Lower East Side of New York. But never have we witnessed such prolonged, determined and sus~ tained "booing" on the part of accredited delegates to such conventions as that which attended the September Democratic convention at Dallas on the 20th of the month traditionally referred to as the "Governor's Convention.'' In fact, in spite of the smooth-functioning steam roller and coopera­tion on the part of most of the press in presenting the gathering to the public as a ''victory" for the Governor, the boos outnumbered the bravos from the start to the finish of the hectic affair and the statewide resent­ment and bitterness toward the Kennedy-Johnson ticket obviously could not be gavelled down. The booing was especially pronounced at any reference to Lyndon Johnson and was so deafening and vociferous that speakers had to care­fully refrain from the mention of his name or risk another hostile demon· stration which would completely drown out their remarks. Convention managers, therefore, had to content themselves with a resolution which merely demanded "support of all party nominees-local, state and na­tional." They did not take chances on an endorsement of Kennedy and Johnson by name. Delegates with blood in their eyes had gone to the convention de­termined to condemn the national platform .,.-.,.hich is almost universally recognized as an authentic Marxist pronouncement. To forestall this, the Governor had the Harris County delegation, representing the city of Houston-and which, along with Fort Worth and Dallas represented the stiffest opposition to Kennedy and Johnson -banned from the floor until the last few minutes of the convention. Also, he prevented a roll call from the State's 254 counties on any Issue which, it is believed, would have brought to light the unyielding opposition in Texas to the Kennedy-Johnson ticket from the rural areas of the State. Public protest against the party's national standard bearers so far has come largely from Houston, Dallas and Fort Worth. It was feared that a roll call by counties would reveal this opposition to be statewide. As appeasement of the vast contingent of dissidents, the Governor had his hand-picked committee write a State Platform which was almost sound and conservative and which contained the minimum of Socialistic provisions. It was his contention that this was sufficient repudiation of the undesirable provisions in the national platform, thereby proving again that timid, wavering and intimidated office holders are like that these days and that they had rather compromise than squarely face an issue any day in the week. And so, while the Chief Executive of Texas may claim a wobbly "victory" at the Governor's Convention at Dallas, there is not the slight­est doubt that State party leaders as they left the conclave were haunted by the echo of boos, catcalls and hisses which, throughout the day, grad­ually mounted into a crescendo of bitterness and resentment beyond any ever displayed on similar occasions and which did not end when the convention did. Hundreds of demonstrators gathered in front of the convention build­ing even after the chairman had suddenly decided to declare the conven­tion adjourned, to hurl vindictive threats at the departing politicos who had vainly tried to stifle and beat down the most stubborn and rugged defiance of a national Democratic ticket ever encountered in the Lone Star State. Candidate Repudiated For One Office. Accepted For Another The most indefensible political behavior on the part of any people in history is represented, in our opinion, by those Texans who are shelling the Woods for the Nixon­Lodge ticket nationally and still in­tend to vote for Johnson for the United States Senate. As a vice presidential candidate committed to the most debased So­cialist platform ever offered for support by American citizens, Johnson is to be repudiated by these voters and then embraced as their candidate for a position which is far more important in the fight for a return to Constitutional Govern· ment than tha~ of the vice presi· dent could possibJy be. If there is any possible hope for reclaiming the American Republic from the morass of National and International S o c i a 1 i s m, it is through the Congress of the United States and especially through the Senate which traditionally serves as a brake on radical legislation in the House of Representatives. To infer that Johnson is not good enough for vice president but is acceptable as a senator from the great State of Texas, is fallacious reasoning of the rankest sort and explains why the Lone Star State is practically without representa­tion in the Upper House of Con­gress. Demoralize the youth of a land and the revolution is already won. -Lenin Savages From The Jungle Gradually Gaining Power In United Nations The United Nations has always been a menace to the United States since it was set up in San Francis­co by Alger Hiss, Harry Dexter White and other American traitors, following the original organization meeting in Moscow, but today its dangerous potentialities are becom­ing evident to all. As has been predicted by level­headed students of world affairs, the recognition of scores of tribal groups from Africa as "Indepen­dent States" and their admission to membership in the U.N. will auto­matically reduce the influence of the Western countries associated with that group. The recent vote on the admission of Red China forcefully illustrates the reduced strength of free na­tions in that body. Whereas the United States delegates have for ten years been able to have the mat­ter of Red China postponed by a heavy majority, they only scratch­ed by in the recent contest by eight votes. All the newly accepted "Inde­pendent States" from Africa either voted againsl the United States and with the Communists or abstained from voting thereby indicating where their sympathy lies. Frorrl this it is not hard to visualize the day when a denizen of the African jungle will head up the great "peace organization" on the banks of the East River in New York. Also, it has been noted in the press that Khrushchev has refused to pay Russia's part of the money for the expense of sending troops into the Suez situation some years ago and it is logical to suppose that he will do likewise in the case of the terrific expense involved in sending troops into the Congo. This will shift a heavy financial burden on the shoulders of som~ respectable nation which does not repudiate its obligations and it re .. quires no genius to figure out what nation that will be. Getting the United States out of the United Nations and the United Nations out of the United States would be the greatest service ever rendered the American Republic if only the members of the United States Senate had the foresight , the patriotism and the courage to do it. People Must Pay The Penalty For. Putting Little Men In Big Jobs "Price Daniel pledges you to up­hold the decision of the people of our local school districts on this important (school segregation) matter. I will put the arm of the State around the decision of our school districts and the officials of our school districts to see to it that no Federal force or any other power is used to overrule our decisions." The above were the big, bold and brave words of Price Daniel when he was asking the people of Texas to elect him Governor when he first ran for that office back in 1956. But when the time came for him to deliver on his solemn promise to the voters who had elected him, he collapsed like a sponge cake with the baking powder left out. In Septembqr of 1960, after his third election as Governor the Houston school board begged and implored him to interpose the au­thority of the Sovereign State of Texas when an NAACP stooge sit­ting as a judge on the Federal bench ordered integration of the public schools there. In direct repudiation of the 'pro· mise he had so gliblv made when running for office in 1956. the little man in 1960 whined to his consti· tuents: "Under decisions of the present Supreme Court, the State has no There was a lot in the papers last year about the suit by the De­partment of Internal Revenue against Adam Clayton Powell, Negro Congressman from New York for evasion of the payment of his taxes. Now it seems to be hushed up and many peoole won· der why. Did the color of his skin save him from the penalties which white men must pay? authority to interpose in a case of this kind.'' He didn't know what he was talk· ing about, of course, for the right of a Sovereign State to interpose its paramount authority in case of tyrannical actions by the Federal government which the States cre­ated, is basic in our form of goy .. ernment. But even if he had wanted to serve the people of Texas who had voted almost four to one against integration of the schools, he had meantime become so involved that · his hands were tied and he couldn't so he had to wiggle out even if he had to misrepresent the facts. He had taken on the responsibil­ity of trying to carry Texas for the national Democratic ticket on a platform which demanded integra­tion, a policy which the people of Texa~ have overwhelmingly re .. jected. So when he had to either double­cross his constituents or Jack Ken­nedy and Lyndon Johnson, the peo• pie of Texas drew the black bean. The defection of the little man is nothing new in politics. It mere .. ly emphasizes once again that the peoole must always pay the penal­ty for entrusting small men with big jobs and the citizens of Texas are paying in full for elevating to high office a squirming politician of diminutive stature. It is reported in the press that a committee of the Congress which is investigating the Bang·Jensen mystery may come up with some startling developments. Does any­body want to bet? Our guess is that, because such information would naturally reflect on the United Nations, it will be sup­pressed on orders from high-level government authorities, Page 4 The Southern Conservative A MONTHLY PUBLICATION OF EDITORIAL OPINION WITH NATIONAL CIRCULATION IDA M. DARDEN, Editor Editorial Officei Flatiron Building ~ort Worth, Texas Phone EO 2.2089 Price $5.00 Per Year (Every paid subscriber is entitled to one free 1ubstr1pfion to be sent to eny periQII ofhi$thootinq.l Sent without cod to members of Conqrus, members of Stefe Leqid<'tfuru, Governors, ~md other public offidels. A helpless sparrow can drift with the wind but it takes an eagle to fly ogainstthestorm. THE TENTH AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES: Herter Gives Hammarskjold Measly Little $5,000,000 According to press reports, when Secretary of State Christian Herter appeared at the United Nations on September 23rd, he handed Secre­tary General Dag Hammarskjold a httle check for $5,000,000 with the statement that it was to be used in the Congo. Earlier, before Congress ad­journed, the State Department asked for $100,000,000.00 for the Congo. This request on the part of that agency followed the horrible rioting, raping and murdering spree of the recently ''liberated" natives in the Congo, who took their "lib­eration" seriously by trying to mur­der or mutilate everybody in sight. Why Mr. Herter gave Mr. Ham­marskjold only $5,000.000.00 is not clear. Perhaps it was all the change he carried in his pocket at the time. On the same date the President was quoted as having assured Mr. Hammarskjold that the U n it e d States would contribute generous­ly to the nations of South Africa in their new status as "liberated" nations. If any American taxpayers were present to give the reaction of those who have to dig down in their jeans to finance the noble experi­ment in "liberation" nothing was said about it. 0 what a shame to have to pick From wacky Jack or tricky Dick. Our only source of comfort then Is just to know they both can't win. -G. R., Houston, Texas THE SOUTHERN CONSERVATIVE Dag Had Better Keep His New- Cannibal Members Well Fed Or He May Get 'Et' As an American with an average knowledge of geography, have you ever heard of the great nation of Chad? Or of the noted empire known as Gabon? Or of the great Republic of Togo? Any American who is not thoroughly familiar with these important centers of culture and civilization shows his ignorance for the United Nations - that great instrument for peace and unity throughout the world-has just accepted them and twelve other equally important States into the Family of Nations. 0\-her great world powers added to the SO-member United Nations group include Cameroon, Federation of Mali , Malagasy, Somalia, Belgian Congo, Dahomey, Niger, Upper Volta, Ivory Coast, French Congo. Cen­tral African Republic and Cyprus. To show that the great World Organization in New York is right on the job and not overlooking any bets. U. N. talent scout, Dag Ham­marskjold, snapped them up a couple of hours after they had been de­clared "indeoendent nations" and before the opposition could sign them uo for the Moscow circuit. The two hours margin of time was allowed them in order to prove their total capacity for self·government. Of course it may be a little humiliating and disconcerting to the United States since fourteen of these new member nations are composed of savage tribes from the dark continent of Africa but they will be on an equal basis with this country in the General Assembly and will cast fourteen votes to our one in the settlement of the serious problems now confronting the world. Also, they probably will not be able to put up their pro rata share of the money for the upkeep of the United Nations since most of them still use shells and crocodile teeth as their medium of exchange. But this disadvantage should be more than offset by the fact that new blood will be brought into the U.N. which political psychiatrists tell us is desirable in the formation of our Bright New World and it will also give emohasis to some new cultural enterorises not previously rep­resented such as witchcraft, cannibalism and head·hunting. It is believed that the Secretary General's action in giving these tribal nations the rush act was inspired by his conviction that their ex­perience in fighting with the lat.est model spears and bows and arrows would make their advice valuable in the settlement of the disarmament problem. Not to be outdone by the U. N. in its concern for the welfare of dark-skinned races, the American State Department immediately asked the Congress of the United States for $100,000,000.00 which, it is un­derstood, will be used, among other things, for the purchase of shiny new Cadillacs for tribal Chieftains in the new States with perhaps enough left over to cover the cost of a couple of additional wives for each one. ------------------------------ "Let Him Who Is Without Sin Cast The First Stone" It is our considered opinion that one of the most sickening and re­pulsive spectacles ever presented in any campaign for public office, high or low, was witnessed in Houston during the visit of a presidential candidate there when several hundred ministers called him up on the carpet and badgered, browbeat and intimidated him for more than an hour because of the church he attends. We certainly hold no brief for Senator John F. Kennedy. In fact because of what we consider his subversive political views, we would not vote for him if he were the last man on earth. Neither do we presume to speak for Catholics as such. We were born and brought up in the Presbyterian Church by Chris­tian parents who, when we were growing up, would have rendered us incapable of eating without standing up for a week, if we had criticised or questioned the good faith of another because of the religious de­nomination to which he belonged. It has always been our understanding that the men and women who settled this Republic of ours fled from the gilded cathedrals of Europe and chose rather to worship God under a tree because of the desire which burned in their hearts for absolute religious freedom. And so we can't help but wonder just who do these conceited, bigoted and self-righteous members of the clergy think they are that they should set themselves up as an Ecclesiastical Court with authority to place an American citizen in the pillory, hold his religion uo to public scorn and question his moral and spiritual fitness, because of it, to hold office in tf1e United States. One of the strongest injunctions in the ·Bible warns that only those who are without sin may cast a stone. So until, and unless, members of the Houston Ministerial Inquisition disassociate themselves from, and openly repudiate, the National Council of Churches whose subversive political activities are legion and which maintains one of the most ex­pensive and powerful lobbies in the nation to influence the passage of Socialist legislation, it comes with poor grace for them to express fear that some extraneous outside force will acquire control of the govern­ment of the United States. Not only was the Houston performance un-American, un-Christian and in bad taste, but a few more stunts like that could enlist sympathy for their target which will help elect him. October, 1960 Politics Is Not Restricted To Those Who Run For Office Here is a little serial storiette which proves that the subtle game of politics is sometimes engaged in by others than those who are candidates for office: On Wednesday, July 20, a Dallas newspaper carried a five-column headline, photographs and an ar­ticle telling how Mrs. Lyndon B. Johnson flew into Dallas and made a bee-line for a noted establish­ment there where she purchased an extensive wardrobe for herself and daughters. This particular store is so widely known throughout the nation that it needs advertising like Eleanor Roosevelt needs a press agent. However, when a Lady Bird who happens to be the wife of a candi­date for vice president of the United States drops down out of the clouds and lands practically on the door­steps of a certain store to the ac­companiment of widespread pub­licity, it is worth a million dollars in advertising to the owners in any .. body's langua~e. Surely some com­pensation is due for such preferen­tial treatment of one establishment over its competitors. On July 27, the same Dallas newspaper carried the announce­ment that the president of the fa­vored Dallas store had "accepted membership on the Businessmen's Committee for Senator John Ken­nedy and Senate Majority Leader. Lyndon B. Johnson. This would seem to be a very gracious return of the compliment paid the fabulous store by one who aspires to be second lady of the land and one which was well de .. served. But, after ali, there are scads of rich Reoublicans in Texas who also make their purchases at this glit­tering emporium in Dallas. On July 28, one day later, the same Dallas newspaper carried the announcement that the store's ex .. ecutive vice president, and inci .. dentallv the brother to the presi .. dent of the establishment, had "ac­cepted membershio on the Texans For Nixon Executive Committee." End of storiette. Grouo Of Protestant Ministers Commended A large group of Fort Worth Protestant ministers recently took action which reflects great honor on their exalted calling and which should inspire allied groups to simi­lar performance. These good men went on record as unalterably ooposed to any pas­tor trying to tell his congregation how to vote in a presidential elec­tion, and projected the theory that a man's personal reli~ious convic­tion is irrelevant to his qualifica­tions as a candidate for high office. "We agree with the principle that just as no hierarchy has a right to tell the president what he should do, no minister has a right to tell his congregation how to vote," a statement by the ministers said. Before next January 20th, the American people should demand once and for all to be told "Who Promoted Peress." .o ·o te 1e >d fd ~ c-tt 1· e. 1: ( 0 ·s October, 1960 THE SOUTHEkN CONSERVATIVE Page 5 Great Proiect Under Way Which Violence In The Congo Reminiscent May Revolutionize Human Destiny Of The Tragedy Of The Old South Mr. Paul Hoffman will be remembered as a man who, following one monumental failure after another in the business world, was set up as a sort of lay statesman highly qualified to help frame economic policies of the Federal government and to determine who should and should not be admitted to membership in the party of his political faith. lf memory serves us right, the late Senator Joseph R. McCarthy, as well as all others of conservative leaning, were designated by Mr. Hoff. man as being unfit for acceptance in the ranks of this sacre.d clan on the grounds that they were not in accord with the forward-lookmg objectives of Modern Republicanism. Mr. Hoffman has been absent from the headlines for some time now but if any one has missed him, they may rest assured that his great brain has not been idle and that he has been engaged in research which should prove of incalculable value to a distressed world in its hour of peril. In a plush office on the 29th floor of the United Nations Building, surrounded by a formidable staff of assistants and backed by a fund of more than $3,000,000.00 the genius of Mr. Hoffman is being concen­trated on a proble)ll on whose solution may depend the fate of nations and the peace of the civilized world. He is delving into the complex subject of the sex habits of the desert locust. Since sex in any form seems to be of paramount importance at this juncture in world history no doubt the sex habits of desert locusts hold the answer to heretofore insoluble questions which have baffled the United Nations in its search for universal peace and human understand­ing throughout the world. At odd times and during the intervals when Mr. Hoffman's brilliant mind is not centered on the amorous activities of desert locusts, he is making a survey of mineral deposits in Uganda as well as. exolori.ng the possibility of setting up a training school for plumbers m the c1ty of Calcutta. For fear that American taxpayers who provide most of the money for these important exploits do not realize the signifi?ance of the un?er­takings, attention is called to the fact that the Pres1dent of the Umte'd States on his recent visit to the United Nations appeared before the Gen­eral Assembly and pledged American financial backing for a 42 per ce~t boost in the special fund which underwrites Mr. Hoffman's great humam­tarian projects. With executive leadership like this devoted to the broadening and extension of valuable research such as Mr. Hoffman is engaged in, what's to keep us from achieving the high goal which destiny has set for us? American Bar Association Should Explain Identification Mix-up At its recent annual meeting the American Bar Association elected Mr. Whitney North Seymour as its next president. The selection of the head of this great organization of legal lumi­naries is extremely important to the American people for he exerts powerful influence, as head of the nation's top-ranking group of legal experts, in shaping economic poli­cies of the Republic and in decisions affecting internal security matters. For this reason attention is called to an unfortunate angle in the case of Mr. Seymour about which some­thing should be promptly done to prevent confusion and misrepre­sentation in regard to Mr. Sey­mour's identity. Apparently, there are two per­sons bearing this distinguished name and in justice to the Bar As­sociation and to its president, this fact should be made clear to the American public. From official records we learn that back in the days of the Roose­velt Dynasty when it was practi­cally deemed imperative to belong to a Communist Front in order to get national recognition, there was a Mr. Whitney North Seymour whose name adorned the files of the committees and agencies which exposed those engaged in subver­sive and un-American activities. \Ve have been furnished with of­ficial documents showing that a Mr. Whitney North Seymour has been reported as belonging to sev-era! organizations cited by the At­torney General of the United States and Committees on Un-American Activities as being Communist and subversive. A Whitney North Sey­mour appears on pages 470 and 474 of the 1944 Report of the Spe­cial Committee on Un-American Activities; on pages 109 and 357 of the Fourth Report of the California Committee on Un-American Activi­ties, 1948 and a Whitney Seymour appears on page 170 of the same report. We realize of course that many organizations these days have no hesitancy in selecting former Com­munist Front members to head up their groups but it is inconceivable that the American Bar Association is among them. We are convinced that any man selected to direct the affairs of that great body would have first been so thoroughly screened that unless he was found, like Caesar's wife, to be above reproach, he never would have been elevated to that exalted position. Because of the unfortunate simi­larity of names, we think it impera­tive that the American Bar Associ­ation make it known to the Ameri­can oeoole that the Mr. Whitney North Seymour recently honored by election as president of their organization is not the person of the same name who was involved with subversive groups in this country several years ago. By Dr. Ruth Alexander Whatever the outcome of Con­golese violence may prove to be, it could serve a worthy purpose for our America. It re-enacts be­fore our very eyes the socio-poli­tico economic aspects of the recon­struction period in the South, 1864- 1876, and close observance and analysis of it could lead to a sym­pathetic and comprehensive under­standing of the southern position today. The horrors of the "tragic era" are within the memory of liv­ing men and are the bas1s of south­ern resistance to similar force bills. The South remembers how it fared when the Negro had the franchise and is understandabl.v reluctant to risk it again. For twelve years, the Negro was the full eQual of the white men in blue and the abso­lute master of the white men in grey. Mississippi had its Negro lieu­tenant governor, secretary of state and superintendent of public in­struction. Alabama's capital at Montgomery was packed with duly elected Negro officials, "gorged on peanuts, soaked with whiskey, and quarreling among themselves with murderous intent''- even as Con­golese tribes todav. Louisiana was forced to open all public convey~ ances. theatres, schools and uni­versities to Negroes. most of whom could neither read nor write. And Arkansas, perhaps a portent of things-to-come, was a veritable ba­ronv of the most astute and cruel of the caroetbaggers, whose fully­armed all-Negro militia moved mercilessly a~ainst the whites at the faintest sign of dissatisfaction with his regime. Atrocities. such as those describ­ed by eyewitnesses as occurring in the Congo today, were common­place thruout the South. Men were castrated, women raped, young girls ravished and mutilated, homes burned and pillaged, the very earth scorched and barren. The official northern position prior to, and dur­ing the war, was that the South could not, and, therefore, had not seceded, hence the term "civil" war. But once the South had been forced to its knees by unconditional sur­render, the official position chang­ed. The South was classified as a hostile and alien enemy, which had seceded, de facto if not de jure, and was to be treated as a separate and conquered nation. lt may be objected that the Ne­groes of the reconstruction and those of the Congo represent dif­ferent levels of civilization. But they were precisely at the same level - illiterate, primitive, sav­age. Witness the understanding of the concept of "freedom" charac­teristic of both. Southern Negroes brought a sack to get their free ­dom: Congolese brought a box to get theirs. To both, freedom meant freedom from work- whence else the boon? - and liberty meant li­cense and licentiousness. The Con­golese fear not men but witchcraft. The southern Negro feared not men but ghosts, hence the origin of the Ku Klux. under fear of which they became industrious and law·abid­ine. for a time, until the KKK, it­self, fell into lawless hands Obviously, the Negroes of today cannot be compared with their an­cestors two generations ago, 1hanks to the costly efforts of the impov­erished South to train and educate them. But in many places they out­number southern whites by large maiorities and the South cannot forget how they had it. Perhaps events in the Congo will help us better to understand the ineradi­cable fear of our fellow·country­men of the South. (Editor's note: The above which appeared in the Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph on September 4 is reprinted by special permission of the author, Ruth Alexander Ph.D; LL.D, of New York, one of the most able and forceful editorial columnists of this generation.) ... What Became Of The Poor Saos Who Worked Their Way Through College? Since a Socialist Congress pass­ed the National Defense Student Loan act last year, approximately 135,000 million students in colleges and universities have been given $60,000,000 of taxpayers money which, of course, finances this pro­gram. The information concerning the number of students and the amounts paid out was given out from Washington by Lawrence G. Derthick. United States Commis­sioner of Education. This is a far cry from the time when American young people who wanted an education and couldn't pay for it, hauled off and worked their way through college. The pro­gram, of course, is part of the over­all plan to tie the Federal govern­ment in with education and give it control over the nation's schools, including institutions of higher learning. Young men who once knocked on the front door and enlisted the sympathy of housewives with their The Federal Government does not have the least vestige of au­thority for eng:;~ging in business enterprises such as the Tennessee Valley Authority :tnJ thousands of ~imilar projects in c0mpetition with private industry lnd we defy any­one to point to 1.ny provision of the American Constitution which licenses such business activities. story of working their way through college by selling magazines are going the way of the dodo bird and the bustle. The new species merely sit dowq and draw a draft on Uncle Sam. Only squares any longer wash dishes, wait on tables or stoke fur~ naces while pursuing their studies at the university or college ot their choice. It's a great world - this Social~: ist Paradise - and it's going to continue to be until the bubble bursts and then - Wow!!! Pogo 6 THE SOUTHERN CONSERVATIVE October, 1960 Why Are Communist Fronters Almost Invariably Selected For High Honors? I Widespread publicity has been given to the fact that Carl Sandburg, poet, has been selected to collaborate in writing the script for the movie "The Greatest Story Ever Told." Since this book, written by Fulton Oursler, depicts the life of Christ and deserves the most accurate and careful handling by qualified stu­dents of the Christian religion whose belief In the Divinity of Christ is unquestioned, the selection of Sandburg to write the screen version ap­pears little short of a caricature on Christianity and a travesty on those things which Christian Americans hold sacred. The selection of Sandburg was made by the 20th Century-Fox Studios whose officials would not be expected to regard pro-Communist activities as a deterrent in a work of this kind but that the Christian people of the country would not unite in publicly denouncing this blas­phemy is something that can be explained only by the vast barrage ot anti-Christian propaganda which has flooded this country for years. Is the American Republic so spiritually impoverished as a result of this propaganda that no writer of unquestioned religious probity could be found for the job and that they would have to search the files of com­mittees investigating un-American activities to find one who could per­form this service? The Communist Front affiliations of Sandburg have been publicized so often and so widely that a repetition may seem redundant but here are some of the organizations he is reported to have been associated with and in view of the Communist attitude toward Christianity, none ot these associations would seem to qualify him for the delicate task which has been assigned to him: Listed as a correspondent of the Federated Press which was cited as a Communist-controlled organization financed by the notorious Gar­land Fund and the Robert Marshall Foundation, both of which are princi­pal sources of funds for Communist enterprises. See Files of the Joint New York Legislative Committee Investigating Seditious Activities, State of New York, 1920, page 1997. Listed as a messenger who carried money for the Finnish Informa­tion Bureau into this country where he was searched by Federal authori­ties on arrival who confiscated the drafts found on his person for the above-mentioned Bureau. This information is found on page 631 of the Report of the Joint Legislative Committee Investigating Seditious Activi­ties, State of New York, 1920. Listed as having been affiliated with the Friends of the Soviet Union, which was cited as Communist by Attorney General Tom Clark, now member of the Supreme Court of the United States. See Appendix IX of the Dies Reports. Listed as a sponsor of the American Rescue Ship Mission, also cited by Attorney General Tom Clark as Communist. See Appendix IX of the Dies Reports. Listed as a sponsor of the Friends of the Abraham Lincoln Brigade, cited by Appendix IX of the Dies Reports as an organization completely controlled by the Communist Party. Listed as having been affiliated with the Hollywood Writers Mobil­ization cited as subversive and Communist by Attorney General Tom Clark and by Appendix IX of the Dies Reports. Listed as having been affiliated with the Joint Anti-Fascist Refugee Committee cited as Communist by the Attorney General and Appendix IX. Ncr'man Thomas Sees No Difference In Two Presidential Candidates It is often said that politics makes strange bedfellows and there must be something in it for we find ourselves in odd company. We agree with a recent statement of Socialist Norman Thomas, can­dida te for president of the United States on the Socialist t icket from 1928 to 1948 when he gave up. The Democratic and Republican parties by that time had stolen the Socialist thunder so Thomas stepped aside and let them take it from there. In a recent speech at Cleveland, Ohio, when asked his choice as .... between Richard Nixon or Jack Kennedy for President of the United States he said he had no preference and he couldn't care less which one was elected. uNeither Nixon nor Kennedy is bothered with excess baggage in ~.. the way of principles," Thomas said in what was probably the under­statement of his career. He has the assurance that re- One of the nation's most out­standing citizens, the Honorable Clarence Manion of Indiana, warns in his widely published column that unless this country takes a positive step to outlaw Communism by breaking off diplomatic relations with all Communist countries, it will be too late. He is exactly right of course but the present adminis­tration only breaks off diplomatic r e I a t i o n s with anti-Communist countries like the Dominican Re­public. As Mr. Manion points out, Communist countries have no legal status as nations and do not repre­sent the people over which they are now r uling with an iron hand but apparently there is no consid­eration on earth that would make the President see it that way. gardless of how the election goes, the policies so often laid down by the Socialist party will be carried out and he should worry. New Angle On A Campaign Mystery Brought Out By Dallas Newspaper There have been many conflict­ing versions of how Lyndon B. Johnson came to be on the Demo­cratic ticket as a candidate for vice president and the story has usually varied according to the in­terest of the one who was telling it. Johnson partisans, including the candidate himself, have carefully built up the illusion that he accept­ed only after John Kennedy per­sonally called on him and begged him to accept the assignment. Ac­cording to that version, Senator Johnson was greatly surprised at the invitation and agreed to accept only after great deliberation on his part. However, it has been revealed that not only was a flat prediction made by one of Johnson's strong supporters, in advance of the con­vention, that the Texas senator would take second place, but it is also charged that Johnson had quietly agreed to a second place a week before the convention opened. This information was contained In an article in the Oak Cliff Tri­bune on July 18th concerning Man­uel DeBusk, secretary of the Dallas C o u n t y Democratic Executive Committee who admitted before leaving Dallas for Los Angeles that he had been assigned the job ot seeking a second place on the t icket fo r Johnson in the event of Kennedy's nomination. It isn't Important particularly. of course, what the circumstances were tn connection with Johnson's decision to accept second place on the ticket with the most liberal candidate in the history of organ­ized politics. The incident merely emphasizes the Texas senator's ap­parent inability to be open, forth­right and above-board with the people whom he seeks to represent In high public office. The Tribune article on July 18 said in part: "A flat prediction that Senator Lyndon Johnson would take second place on the ticket behind Senator John Kennedy was made in ad­vance of the convention by Manuel DeBusk, the Democratic Executive Committee secretary from Dallas _County who served as an alternate delegate. j'In by-lined articles for The Tri­bune, which he serves as secretary and legal counsellor, Mr. DeBusk They'll Do It Every Time When Killer Khrushchev first an­nounced his intention of attending the United Nations and the State Department issued an ultimatum that his movements would be re­stricted to Manhattan, there was general agreement that the old scoundrel should be so restricted. With one exception. From London where she was vis­iting at the t ime came Eleanor Roosevelt's response to the sug­gestion and, in true Rooseveltian tradition, she registered a thunder­ing "NO." It was uperfectly silly" for the State Department to restrict the Soviet Premier to Manhattan, wire services quoted Mrs. Roosevelt as wrote in the issue of July 11: 'While most of the Texas delega~ tion feels that a Johnson-Kennedy ticket would be the strongest the Democratic party can offer, we do not want to overlook the possibility of a Kennedy-Johnson ticket.' ''While most ot the convention seemed stunned that the young presidential nominee would tap the Texan-including the majority ot the Lone Star delegation-DeBusk explained that Johnson had quietly agreed to second place a week be­fore the convention opened. "At a meeting last Thursday night in Oak Cliff, just hours before he emplaned for Los Angeles, DeBusk pointed out that Johnson had much to gain and nothing to lose as vice president. "Should the Democrats prevail in November, the Majority Lead· er's post would largely be cere• monial with the administration call­ing the shots, DeBusk declared. ''Since Texas law was amended so Johnson can run for both Sen­ator and for Vice President, if the Republicans win he would still be Majority Leader of the Democratic controlled Senate. "Another factor which was con­sidered at length was the fact that Senator Johnson would be only 59 should Kennedy win twice ... and still a distinct presidential possi· bility." "It would appear certain, DeBusk continued, that Senator Johnson would have a clear advance under­standing from Senator Kennedy about the responsibilities of the Vice President in a Democratic ad­ministration. Undoubtedly, they would be of a consequential nature which would enable the Texan to mold an image that would later be acceptable to the party liberals and labor leaders. "The Tribune attorney admitted before he headed west that he had been assigned to the job of seeking a second place slot for Johnson. In the July 11 article, DeBusk pre­dicted that Kennedy had better than 50-50 chance of carrying the convention on first ballot. "We Texans are inclined to be guided by our hearts instead of our heads," wrote DeBusk in predicting a Kennedy sweep. "Personally, I think the chances are better than ever Kennedy will be nominated on first ballot." When on earth is a National Ad .. ministration in Washington going to crack down on the Reds in the State Department and stop all the oro-Communist projects which originate there, and which are paid for by taxpayers' money? How can we combat Communism abroad un­til we have stamped it out here at home? saying in London. uKhrushchev's already been all around the United States. How in blazes can we now tell him he's restricted to Manhat­tan Island? It's nonsense, just non­sense." To show her contempt for this treatment of the Bolshevik thug, Mrs. Roosevelt entertained him in her apartment in New York follow­ing her return from England thus maintaining the family record of pro-Communist sympathy on any and all occasions. October, I 960 THE SOUTHERN CONSERVATIVE Page 1 "THE SOCIALIST PARTY HAS NOT LOST AN ELECTION IN THIS COUNTRY SINCE 1931' The incomparable Tom Ander­son, editor of Farm and Ranch, Nashville, Tennessee and who has a worthwhile opinion on everything and is not afraid to express it, in his column "Straight Talk" gives his views on both candidates for President. His conclusion, in brief, is "A plague on both houses." His comments are reproduced below: Southern Conservatives (and American patriots anywhere) who stay in the Democrat Party remind me of the two skeletons in the clos­et. One turned to the other and rattled: "What are we doing here?" .. I don't know," the second skeleton replied, '"but if we had any guts we'd get out!" John Kennedy is a ruthless, cold and cocky kid trying to buy the office with his daddy's money. (Presidential elections have been bought before, but not by one fam­Ily.) I am a Methodist, and if Ken­nedy were a poor, mature Meth· odist hishop from Mississippi, I wouldn't vote for him for dogcatch­er because I'd be afraid he'd either socialize the kennel or give it to some foreign country. I think less of Johnson. an AU-American hypo­crite of such unusual ability he's a modern American menace. The issue is not Republican vs. Democrat. The issue is not seg­gregation vs. integration. The issue is freedom. Both parties are mov­ing toward an all -powerful inter­national Socialist dictatorship. A centralized welfare state brings slavery, not freedom. Property rights is the very basis of "human rights." The right to self·determina­tipn of associates is the essence of •·human dignity." Forced equality is not democracy but dictatorship. Equal men are not free and free men are not equaL Nixon and Kennedy are young opportunists on the make, riding the Socialist wave as far as it will take them. Neither has the neces­sary character - but then we haven't had that in any President since Hoover. I have been a littJe unfair at times in the past, saying the dif­ference between the Democrat and Republican Parties is merely "which twin has the Toni?". There is a difference, particularly now that John Kennedy has taken over. But the difference is not enough to get my vote. I don't believe in creeping Socialism any more than I do in creeping integration. Depend on Nixon-Lodge to save this country from the international Socialists? Nixon reminds me of the airplane pilot who, with both motors on fire, donned his para­chute and soothingly purred to the passengers: "Don't anybody panic! I'm going for help now." Nixon is a politician. Politicians can't save this country. They brought it to this brink of disaster and defeat. Norman Thomas, who should know, has said that we've made more progress toward Socialism under Eisenhower than even under Truman. Facts support this state­ment. Norman Thomas got 267,- 420 votes for President in 1928 and a little more than half of that in 1948. Thomas now says that both candidates are satisfactory to him. Nixon is lesser-of-evi1s. Lesser­of- evils is a wasted vote. Voting for lesser-of-evils is an endorse­men of evil. There is no way to win, voting for lesser-of-evils. You are silencing your voice, di.sinfranchis­ing yourself if you vote for lesser­of- evils. I'm not sure a Kennedy victory would be catastrophic. Just like I'm not sure the nation wouldn't have been better off if Norman Tho­mas had been elected in 1932, or Stevenson in 1952. These candi­dates are for what they call "hu­man rights," the brotherhood of man, the welfare state. They are for international Socialism, al­though some haven't the courage to call it that. If Thomas, Steven­son, or Kennedy or their like should get a chance to install their all­powerful federal state, then the people would have a choice. An opposition party would arise. (Of course, we might never be able to unscramble the Socialist egg.) As it is, there is no real opposition party. Both major parties are in­filtrated, dominated and owned by Socialists, one-worlders, welfarers and fellow travelers. We can't save America by drag­ging our feet to slow down the So­cialist toboggan. We can't win by choosing lesser-of-evils, by giving­in a little at a time, by surrender­ing our freedom piecemeal, by de­faulting each succeeding skirmish as it occurs. In fact, it may be bet­ter to join full-scale battle now­win or lose-than to surrender on the Installment plan. Otherwise, there'll be no final major battle to win. Just the firing squad. I believe in staying in any organization­and that includes my church--only so long as there is a chance to save it. The Democrat Party is not even worth talking about saving. Evidently Senator Goldwater thinks he can save the Republican Party. A party owned by Nixon, Dewey, Percy, Rockefeller, Lodge, Keating, Javits-can't be saved from Social­ism. Goldwater has as much chance of returning the Republican Party to Americanism, Constitutionalism and states rights as Neville Cham­berlain had at Munich. A platform is worth no more than the man who runs on it. And that makes both platforms virtual­ly valueless. A platform is like a wedding dress: used only once, and even then it sometimes flies false colors. I went to both conventions. Dele­gates at both had this obvious char­acteristic: The Party comes first. Many of them would support a Cas­tro- Cyrus Eaton ticket if it would get the most votes. The delegates of both parties are primarily self­seeking politicians, influence ped­dlers and limelight junketeers with­out integrity or the courage to buck the tide. Letting these people de­cide who should save our country in these times is like letting Bever­ly Aadland be Housemother in a boys' dormitory. In some states it is relatively easy to get somebody to vote for on the ballot - an independent candidate or unpledged independent electors. Your clean-cut dissent in this way makes your voice heard. Deadly Assault Against American Security Is Due During Next Session Of Congress Close friends and associates of President Dwight D. Eisenhower during World War II revealed early in his term that his principal ob­jective before he left office was to bring about One-World Government. His actions since becoming president have more than borne out this claim, Through some sort of confused thinking, he seems convinced that it is only in this manner that peace may be assured in the world. The fact that in the process the United States would lose its sovereignty and be­come a mere province in a One-World State does not appear to hold the horrible potentialities for him that it does to other loyal American citi .. zens. If there was ever any doubt as to where he stood on the subject, It was dispelled when he appeared before the American Bar Association at its annual convention in August and pleaded for that organization to exert Its influence In helping to bring about the repeat of the Connally amend­ment. When the United States Senate declared our adherence to the World Court, set up by the United Nations and composed of one United States member against fourteen Socialist and Communist country members, the Connally amendment made our adherence contingent upon this country deciding what were and what were not domestic issues and therefore not subject to the World Court's jurisdiction. It is our only protection against an alien Court which could declare ,._ such questions as immigration, foreign trade, the Panama Canal, foreign aid and any other subject the Court might decide to be International rather than domestic issues. In view of the potentialities tor disaster to the economy and security of the American Republic inherent in repeal of this amendment, it has been difficult for the average informed American to understand how the President, the Attorney General, Vice President. the Secretary of State, the Solicitor General and other high-ranking national officials could take sides with those who favor repeal of this amendment. With this powerful battery of national leaders, as well as many prominent members of the United States Senate, committed to this dan .. gerous proposal, it is going to take an almost solid phalanx of determined loyal citizens to prevent this safeguard to our liberties ·from being taken from us. As soon as Congress convenes in January, it is understood that an .. other assault will be made against the amendment in the Senate and as the advocates of repeal do not always fi ght fair and are not above attempts to sneak such legislation by under various guises, all good citi .. zens must be eternally on guard to prevent betrayal of the Republic into the hands of its enemies by way of the World Court. A World Court with unlimited power over the citizens of this and other countries is the first essential to the setting up of World Govern­ment as any literate American knows and it is the responsibility of all patriots to see that our national sovereignty is not surrendered to this alien power. From a physician in Yonkers, New York: ''Your publication con­tinues to fascinate me as no other ever has. It certainly is a blessing to read the facts and not propa­ganda." From a retired business execu­tive and his wife in Houston: "Our compliments to you for helping America wake up." "Your paper packs a powerful lot of punch," says a student at the University of Oklahoma at Nor­man. If Kennedy or Nixon can be kept from getting a majority in the Electoral College, the election would be thrown into the House of Representatives. There could be 57 free electors from the South. It takes 269 elec­toral votes to elect a ticket. In 1948, if those 57 votes had been taken away from Truman, he'd have been 20 votes short. In that event, the House could have elected Strom Thurmond President. Unlikely? Yes. But there is a small chance. And I'll take that, however small, in preference to voting lesser-of-evils. Some people say a Third Party can't be successful. That's not true. The most successful political party in this country is the Socialist Par­tv Tt hasn't lost an election since 1932. Senator John F. Kennedy is quot­ed as defending his sponsorship of the minimum wage bill by say­ing that Hpeople at the bottom of the economic ladder" should be helped. Maybe they should but there is no more Constitutional authority for using Federal law to help them than there is for helping people at the "top" of the economic ladder or people in the "middle" of the economic ladder. He also said he feels the Federal government has a responsibility to see that workers are paid a de­cent wage. He, of course, has the Constitution of the United States mixed up with the Manifesto be· cause there is no provision for set­ting anybody's wages in the Amer­ican Constitution. That is only the business of the employer and the employee. Richard Nixon is quoted in the press as saying in an interview: "We recognize that our indepen­dence and freedom cannot be con­sidered as separate from those of other nations." Why can't our in­dependence and freedom be con· sidered as separate from those of other nations? By what Constitu· tional authority does any Amer~ ican leader dare tie our destiny to that of foreign countries? This statement alone is enough to cause responsible Americans to vote against Nixon for President, even though they may gain nothing by suooortine: his onnonPnt Page I THE SOUTHERN CONSERVATIV! Oelober, 1960 'One-Man Legislation' Makes We Give The High Cou.-t A Little Conspiracy For 'Take-Over' T~tai~s ~~ .. s~o~~a~~~L~~k::m- Help In Disposing Of Its Docket Is T~ed::~t~e~ne~n~~h::re~!~!. bers of the Texas Legislature made Among the cases which the Supreme Court will be called on to tive government has been sounded laughing stock of the Lone Star decide during its current term are some highly interesting Constitutional in the State of Connecticut. Thus is State by passing a law which per· questions to be settled. forged another link in the conspir· mitted a candidate to run for two acy known as "Metro Government'' offices at the same time. Since the great judicial experts on the Court have such a heavy to centralize units of local govern- No secret was made of the fact that this statute was passed for the exclusive benefit of Senator Lyndon Johnson who intended to try for national office but wasn't sure of himself in that field and, in event of defeat, wanted to hold on to his Senate job. This was not only "class legis~ lation" which political demagogues are so fond of denouncing but con­stituted actually legislation in be­half of one single individual for it was never contemplated that any other politician except Johnson would benefit from it. There was much opposition to the measure at the time statewide, but members of Congress who have been in office any great length of time manage to assemble an army of stooges and bootlickers in their home State Legislatures and John­son is no exception. The bill, backed by the Governor of the State, passed by a large maiority and has engendered much ridicule through~ out the country. To compound the comedy, John­son is running1 for vice president on the national ticket as a "liberal" and for United States Senator on the State ticket as a "conservative." If this amazing feat has ever been d u olicated in t he hi s tory of po li t ics, there is no record of it. Senator Barry Goldwater of Ari­zona recently made humorous ref­erence to it in an address to more than a thousand Democrats and Reoublicans attending a luncheon in his honor at Fort Worth. He said he could foresee a day when, following this practice to its logical conclusion, a candidate might be permitted to run for every office on the ballot and under the law of avera-ges would be sure to win some of them. He could then take his pick of the one he liked best and toss the others overboard. The Arizona Senator said he had long cherished a secret desire to be a sheriff and that if his State should adopt the Texas plan, he would include that among the of­fices for which he would announce. There was a time when a man running for the presidency of the United States just hauled off and ran-all by himself. Now the cam­paiP, n is made on a family basis and wives, children, mothers, sis­ters, uncles, aunts, cousins and in­laws are climbing all over the podium in the mad scramble to elect the candidate of their clan. Everybody gets into the act except the family cat and dog. From a Chicago business execu~ tive: 1'That paper is peculiarly yours. Nobody else dares let loose with the broadsides you publish; there are too many of us who are conducting our campaigns against what is wrong from under the bed. You are a two~gun gal and willing to take on all comers, so God bless Our Ida - may her shadow never lessen.•• docket with a big backlog of appeals, we are generously offering to help rnent which will make it easier for them out by making advance decisions for them. those who hope for an eventual This will not only conserve the valuable time of the great jurists but take~over in this country to realize will tip off the litigants as to what they may expect under the modern the dream. conception of justice. On September 30 the Associated Our decisions will not be cluttered with legal terms and phrases Press had this to say of the tragedy because we are ignorant of such things and besides when we are dump4 in the Nutmeg State: "The bells ing the Constitution why not toss overboard the legal verbiage along toll at midnight Friday for Con4 with it? After all, if we are going to be modern, why not go the whole necticut's three~century-old system hog? of county government. At the stroke of 12 a form of government evolved in Colonial Days will be no more. Its passing was decreed by the Democratic-controlled legis· lature last year. It was doomed in the interest of goyernmental effi4 ciency. Most of the county govern· ment's responsibilities and its $22,· :?,00,000 in buildings-will be trans· ferred to the State •.. " Our decisions also will differ somewhat from those which will later come from the Court since we have jazzed them up a little bit to make them conform to the new standards of value in the administration of American justice. The following are among the important issues which the Court will be called on to settle together with the rulings which we have big­heartedly agreed to hand down for them in the interest of expediency and we believe that these advance decisions of ours will vary little in fundamental aspects from those which will come down later from the great legal brains on the high Bench: Question: Pennsylvanians want to know if reading the Bible in the public schools of that State is Constitutional. Decision: What's the matter with you guys? Are you crazy or something? Of course it's not Constitutional. Let the students read the Communist Manifesto, certainly, but the Bible is out. Question: Louisiana people want to know if a State law requiring the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People to dis· close its list of members and contributors is Constitutional. Decision: Don't be silly. Won't you Pelicans ever learn that no State law is Constitutional when it conflicts with the NAACP? Question: Citizens of Maryland want to know if it is Constitutional to require a public office holder to decla re a belief in God. Decision: Listen yo r glie Cls! Dido' you ever hear of bad psycho· logical reactions as a result of outdated customs, practices and tradi· tions? The requirement that a public office holder declare a belief in God might tend to inspire a feeling of inferiority on the part of college professors who subscribe to Atheism and is, therefore, contrary to the Constitution as presently interpreted. Question: Can the dues of a worker compelled tO join a union be used for political purposes over his objection? Decision: It's none of the worker's business what his money is used for and the law governing Union procedure is anything the Labor Bosses say ft is. Where do you working bums think the money is coming from to re-elect labor's friends in the House and Senate, anyway? Question: The State of Alabama would like to have the rights of its Legislature to re-zone a district confirmed even if such re-zoning may be claimed to affect the right of Negroes to vote. Decision: Whatever gave the people of Alabama the idea that a State Legislature, and especially a Southern State Legislature, had any rights? Case dismissed. We would like to help the Court further in its solemn deliberations but our docket is crowded, too, and so we must adjourn until another term. Delegates To United Nations May Risk The Loss of Thei.- Dukes A UPI dispatch headlined Bakwanga, Kasai Province, dated August 31, headed "No Prisoners Taken in Bloody War," gives us a fair idea of the moral principles of the people of the new countries which the United Nations is accepting for full~fledged membership in that body: "Captives are killed out of hand by both sides in the round-the­clock fighting. Both sides are cutting off the hands of their dead adver­saries and sporting them as trophies on their belts. About 1,200 Congo­lese troops are locked in a battle to the death with half-naked 250,000- strong Baluba tribesmen fighting the Congolese army with bows and arrows." Apparently these new black boys which the United Nations is col­lecting in droves, play sort of rough and it is devoutly to be hoped that they discontinue their cute little custom of whacking off human arms below the elbow by the time they arrive at that gilded palace of peace, untty and umversal brotherhood on the banks of the East River in New York. . Maybe it would be safer if the pther delegates kept their hands m their pockets unt1l their colleagues from darkest Africa become "house­broke" and realize that this playful practice just possibly might be re~ garded as a violation of Human Rights. The proceedings followed in Con .. necticut were those which have been pursued elsewhere since the scheme was first rigged in the Rockefeller~financed headquarters of Metro Government at 1313 East 60th Street in Chicago and which is spreading rapidly throughout the country. Under the guise of "efficiency•• the plan calls for the replacement of duly elected officials by appoint· ive ones who have supreme author .. ity in making major decisions with· out regard to the wishes of tli8 citizens of the community. One of the basic principles set down by those who founded the Republic was that government should be spread out as widely as possible and that centralization of power locally, statewide and na .. tionally, should be avoided at all costs. In his discussions regarding the fundamentals of Communism, Len­in made it clear that a nation could only be taken over after local units of government had been destroyed and the greatest possible measure of centralization had been achieved. Metro Government was set up to bring about this centralization in local governments. If there was any organized op~ position by the people of Connec­ticut to the destruction of their representative system of local gov· ernment. there was no mention made of it. But after all, the great State of Connecticut is largely dominated by Mr. Chester Bowles and Gover .. nor Abraham Ribicoff who seem to have everything under control, so what right have mere citizens to interfere? All they are supposed to do is furnish the money and ask no ques .. tions. The Social Welfare Director of Jakarta, Indonesia, which is now enjoying "independence" since the withdrawal of the Dutch, is named Muljads Djojomartono. Mr. Djojo­martono is reported in the press to be preparing a bill for introduction in the local lawmaking body which will restrict Moslems there to one wife each except in cases of "emer­gency." It was not explained what would constitute an emergency which would make these extra marital reinforcements necessary.
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