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The Southern Conservative, Vol. 7, No. 1, January 1956
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The Southern Conservative, Vol. 7, No. 1, January 1956 - File 001. 1956-01. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 24, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/southern/item/59/show/50.

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(1956-01). The Southern Conservative, Vol. 7, No. 1, January 1956 - File 001. The Southern Conservative. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/southern/item/59/show/50

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Southern Conservative, Vol. 7, No. 1, January 1956 - File 001, 1956-01, The Southern Conservative, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 24, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/southern/item/59/show/50.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Southern Conservative, Vol. 7, No. 1, January 1956
Contributor
  • Darden, Ida M.
Publisher Southern Conservative
Date January 1956
Language English
Subject
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
Place
  • Fort Worth, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 10604411
Collection
  • Houston Metropolitan Research Center
  • Ida M. Darden Collection
  • The Southern Conservative
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Houston Metropolitan Research Center.
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript THE SOUTHERN CONSERVATIVE -To Plead for a Return of Constitutional Government- Vol. 7 FORT WORTH, TEXAS, JANUARY,I956 No. I AN OPEN LETTER TO MR. HENRY FORD II . New Year Pledge for All Derelict Citizens In the beginning of this year of our Lord, 1956, I here and now proclaim my intention to cast off the chains which have held me as a captive of corrupt politicians and to hereafter assert my full authority as one of the masters of those who represent us in the Congress and the White House and who are employed and paid to ·act solely as public servants of the people who elected them. From this day forward, I shall strive to prove worthy of my g1or4 ious and God-given status as a Sovereign Citizen of the United States by reclaiming and exercising fully the responsibilities and prerogatives which attach to that exalted and honorable estate. Through timidity, indifference and inaction, and by servile sub­mission to the will of brazen demagogues, I have failed in my sacred obligations by neglecting to publicly protest the dissipation of the sub­stance of the American people and the surrender of the mighty resources of this Republic toward the furtherance of anti-American plots by for­eign conspirators. By this omission, I now face the humiliating realization that I have been an unwitting party to acts of treason against my count~y . To the extent that I have remained silent in the face of official ac­tions by our representatives in \Vashington which are clearly against the interests of the people of the United States, I now contemptuously regard myself as equally guilty with them in the betrayal of my fellow Americans and of my country to its enemies at home and abroad. By my silence and tacit approval of Legislative acts and Executive directives, treaties and secret agreements contrary to the provisions of the Constitution, I have abrogated my responsibility as a loyal Amer­ican to defend my country and its institutions by every means within my power. By my failure to register disapproval, when dissent was in order, I have not only helped to give aid and comfort to the enemy, but have contributed to my own delinquency as a citizen of the American Re­public. In future, I shall earnestly strive to keep ever in mind that in this country elected officials are merely public servants of their masters, the people; that under our form of government, every voter is a Sov­ereign, and every citizen a King and to remember always that those who govern us derive their just power only from the consent of the governed. Beginning at the precinc't level, I shall exert my last ounce of energy, effort and initiative in helping to elect delegates to County, State and National conventions whose primary concern is for the safety, security and preservation of the American Republic. I shall plead fervently with my neighbors, friends and associa.tes to repudiate the internationalist traitors who now dictate American policy and to so cast their ballots for candidates for all offices, from the White House down to the local School Board, that none but Amer­Icans shall be placed on guard. And finally, in this momentous Year of Decision when the fate of the Nation hangs in the balance, I shall strive valiantly to make atone­ment for my past defection as a Sovereign Citizen, meantime clinging r;;:ly to the hope that I have not waited too long nor awakened too Let's Exterminate the Politicians And Keep the Grasshoppers Federal Department of Agriculture officials announced recently that their scientific experts are well on the way toward the develop­ment of a preparation which will eliminate pests who destroy every­thing in their path and cause an annual loss of millions of dollars. When they get it perfected, we know some places they could try it out without having to leave Washington. THE SOUTHERN CONSERVATIVE -To plead for a return of Comtitutional Government- IDA M. DARDEN Fl•tiron Building EDITOR FORT WORTH, TEXAS Mr. Henry Ford II, President Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, Michigan. Dear Mr. Ford: January 13, 1956 On February 24, 1953, the Congress of the United States approp­riated $300,000 to be used by the Congressional Committee on Un­American Activities in investigating Communist infiltration of the American government. The next day, on February 25, 1953, you made pikers out of the Congress by appropriating $15,000,000 to be used, as it turned out, in attempts to prevent any investigation of Communist infiltration of the American government. The Foundation you set up was called the Fund for the Republic but it is only now that the people of this country are coming to realize that the Republic in whose behalf the Fund is being expended is the Soviet, and not the American Republic. As one who, from the very first, editorially exposed the ob jectives of the Fund for the Republic, I naturally am extremely gr atified that the AmE:=rican people are finally becoming conscious of the danger to our country which this project poses. Under the administration of this Fund by Robert M. Hutchins, the nation's champion addled-brained egghead, and one of the staunchest defenders of the rights of Communists in the United States, its activities have inspired nation-wide suspicion of you and the Ford organization. This loss of confidence in the principal Ford executive must in­evitably bring shame and reproach to the honorable name of your grandfather who accumulated the money you so heedlessly give away without reservation, restrictions or restraint. Lately you seem to have become alarmed over this sweeping re­sentment against you as attested by the increased activity of your press agents. enormous. gifts to non-political units !).nd your own public state­ment disclaiming any knowledge of, or responsibility for , the objectives or disbursements of the gigantic Fund for the Republic. Informed Americans, however, are going to be slow to buy your assertion that you willingly turned over $15 ,000,000 for purposes of which you were ignorant and to be expended by persons of whose subversive record you had no knowledge. Responsible business execu­tives, Mr. Ford, are simply not that careless with money. Even though it is generally conceded that the genius of the founders of American industry is seldom reproduced in their progeny, it will be difficult for 'the American people to ascribe such monumental stupidity as this to one of Henry Ford's descendants. The only alternative, therefore, is the widespread conclusion that you knew what you were doing when you did it and that you now wish to stem the flood-tide of criticism and buy back favorable public opinion by an enormous donation to schools and hospitals. The gift to the hospitals is a worthy gesture but the majority of the educational institutions who were the recipients of your generosity will merely supplement the propaganda of the Fund for the Republic by continuing to brain-wash American youth. So you will have to come up with a better plan if you hope to minimize the damage that Hutchins has done to your reputation and to the American economy and which he will continue to do until his money runs out. Otherwise, the good name of the Fords cannot be retrieved nor their former record for probity in dealing with the public, re-established. ~ere are scores of honorable and irreproachable organization! in this country whose objectives are the exact opposite of those to which the Fund for the Republic is committed and they offer, in my humble opinion, the solution to the unhappy dilemma into which your ill-advised bequests ltave plunged you. Since I have not the slightest connection with any one of these or­ganizations, I claim complete exoneration from the charge of any per­sonal interest in the proposal which I shall make. (Continued on Page Z) Million 5 of Am e rica n 5 T h ink It-The S out he r n C on 5 e r v a ti v e Say 5 It Page 2_ ___________T _H_E_s_o_u_T_H_E_R_N_C_O_N_S_E_R_V_A_T_IV _E_ _________J_ ••_••_•Y_· 19-56 Subversive Murals As Hard to Get Rid of As Harry Bridges All They Had to Do Was to Good Citizens Urged to Read the Times Editorials Senator James 0. Eastland and his Accept Jury Service There is a strong Soviet belief that "art is a weapon'' and that good Communist propaganda can be pro­moted as effectively through pic­tures as by means of the written word. Perhaps no greater demonstration has been made of this means of in­filtration than in the case of the murals in the Rincon Annex of the United States Post Office in San Francisco, It is a long story dating back to 1948 when these murals were installed but we will try to boil it down to the essentials. In 1941 the Federal Works Agency in Washington announced a competition, open to American ar­tists only, for the painting of 27 murals in the Rincon Annex at a cost o.f $26,000. Some kind of an "art" committee passed on the selec­tion and a character named Anton Refreiger of Woodstock, New York, was chosen. Apparently no one thoughh to go into the background of Refreiger until years later when th~y found that this "American" artist was born in Moscow, Russia, in 1905 and drifted into this country in 1920 where he remained ten years before becoming naturalized. In the mean· time and durink following years, he joined thirty-three different organi­zations and publications cited as sub· versive and dedicated to the over· throw of the United States govern­ment. Soon alter receiving the commis­sion to paint the San Francisco mur­als he went to work on the job of portraying the life of the pioneers of the Golden State of California. The murals were to reflect the glorious and romantic history of that great commonwealth and the part Jt played in the early days of the American R~publlc. When the murals were finished and installed in the Rincon Annex, they were found to portray class struggle, racial hatred and discrimi· nation, labor strife, violo'!nce and po­litical corruption. To do tt up brown, the "artist" had placed the Ameri· can Flag in a secondary position ~ that of other nations il~ustrated in the murals. The American Legion immediate­ly protested. and classed the murals in a resolu~lon passed by their Cali­fornia Department as "subversive and designed to spread Communistic propaganda and tending to promote racial hatred and class warfare". The Legion was joined by protests from Veterans of Foreign Wars, As­sociated Farmers of California, Sons of the American Revolution, San Francisco Chamber of Commerce, Native Sons and Native Daughters of the Golden West, Society of West­ern Artists and numerous other civic and cultural organizations in an at­tempt to have the objectionable mur­als removed. Senate Internal Security sub-commit· tee did some good work in investigat~ ing the New York Times and turning up many present and former Commu-rtists and fellow travelers. The committee did an excellent job which required a lot of hard work and the expenditure of lots of money but it seems to us that they went about it the hard way. They could bave acquired this in~ Mr. W. P. Bomar, Fort Worth business executive, thinks that the administration of justice ia greatly hampered because of the caliber of those chosen for jury service. "A jury of our peers," in Mr. Bomar's opinion, has become a mean~ ingless term and juries are too often chosen from those of the lower strata who hang around court houses wait~ ing to make a fast dol1ar. In fact, a highly organized cam- formation as we and millions of others paign for their removal has been go- have done - just by reading New ing on against the offensive mut<a.Is York Times editorials and especially ~e t~:a~~~~~~n;:?e~:~~n';~,iC:~s r:~ 1 its ~unday Magazine section of book Mr. Bomar pointed out that in a recent case the only individual juror who owned property was a colored woman who, with her husband, oper· lasted the War of the Roses, but reviews. ate! a cleaning plant." which, results-wise, has been as in· Unfortunately, the Times is only effective as the attempts of the Su· one of the many thousands of offend~ ~a~~; ir~~~s.toTh~ep~~ra~o~:u;ii~i ers in the matter of slanted writing there and being viewed by hundreds in the press. Louis Budenz told Con­of thousands of California school gressional committees how, during the children in conducted tours. days when he was high up in Com· "There is no greater service that Chambers of Commerce can re11.der in their respective citiel!l and towns than to urge representative citizens to ac· cept jury service and thlll!l improve the quality of justice," Mr. Bomar During the years of effort on the said. part of patriots to get rid of these murals, they have been given the run-around by practically everybody in Washington including the Post Master General, Commissioner of Public Buildings, the Republican National Committee, a California senator, a vice president, and numer­ous other authorities and even though a public hearing was held by a sub­committee of the House which cover­ed 87 pages in its published report in which all facts in connection with tt-e matter were set forth, the murals are still there high and dry on the Rincon Annex walls. Pictures of them show that they, like most modern art, appear to have been drawn by some one who was crazy or drunk or both. Perhaps the most determined op­ponent of the murals is Mr. Charles E. Plant, Past Commander of Federal Post 315 of the American Legion who is still going strong and who promises that the matter is not yet ended and won't be until the murals are remov· ed. As an interested observer, it would seem to us that there remains only one of two ways to get rid of this junk and that is either for a minor California earthquake o! a localized nature to happen along and take care of the situation or for some of the descendants of the hardy California pioneers to ride into the building on their trusty Pintos and puncture the trashy things with bucltshot. munist Party councils, M o scow worked overtime to infiltrate the Am~rican press and other communica. tions media but his warning has large-­ly gone unheeded. The Unite<.! Nitions is our only hope for survival and is the only available means of insuring peace and ending wars. How do we know this? Because three Presidents of the United State. and Alger Hiss have told us so. An Open Letter It is one of the first responslbilities of citizenship to serve on juries and the evasion of this duty is unfair to Court officials who seek to maintain law and order, Mr. Bomar pointed out. The Spirit of Geneva turned out to be merely the misplaced trust and confidence of a bunch of babes in the woods wearing striped pants in the good intentions of Kremlin gangsters. (Continued from Page 1) To name just a very few such organizations: The Committee for Constitutional· Government; Daughters of the American Revolution; Defenders of the American Constitution; Americanism Committee of the American Legion; Sons of the American Revolution; Campaign for the 48 States; For America; We, the People; Congress of Freedom, Foundation for Economic Education; National Economic Council; Fed­eration for Constitutional Government; National Pro America; Organ• ization for Repeal of the Sixteenth Amendment; Minute Women of the United States; Western Tax Council; Church League of America; American Progress Foundation and scores of other great organizations, groups and publications who are working as earnestly for the preserva .. tion of the American form of government as the Fund for the Republic is striving to destroy it. If you really wish to prove your sincerity and refute once and for all time growing accusations that Ford money is beifli utilized to sub­sidize movements for the overthrow of the American form of govern .. ment. I earnestly plead that you be equally generous with the foregoing and similar organizations to whose good name no such taint attaches. Your total gifts to the Fund for the Republic and the hospitals and universities are reported at $515,000,000 but it is a matter of general knowledge that you still have an even greater amount stashed away in your sock and your piggy bank. · What We Should Do Estes Running for President About United Nations Of Some Country or Other Senator Estes Kefauver has And so, in all good conscience, I beg you to select an amount some ... where in between the $15,000,000 which you gave to the Fund for the Republic and the $500,000,000 you donated to hospitals and colleges and divide it equally between the above-mentioned and similar groups which will thus enable them to broaden and extend their Americanism programs to an extent that they will be in position to largely offset Now that it has been proved time and again and especially in the case of Egypt and Israel that the United Nations is as impotent as a Texas longhorn in any kind of an emergency, we see only two things which should be done about it. One, get the United States out of the United Nations, send the spies and saboteurs back where they came from and give the buildings and grounds back to the Rockefel­lers. Two, convert it to some worthy Educational, Social and Cultural project which the large Founda .. tions would be happy to finance such as an international nudist colony where people of all races, colors, sexes • and religions may mix and mingle to their heart's content. tossed his hat in the ring and in· dicated that he wants to be Presi~ dent but it is not quite clear to us just what country he wants to head as Chief Executive. Last summer he was conducting a baby·kissing campaign in Mos­cow and in December he bobbed up on a program in Los Angeles to raise money to finance the State of Israel, although his own ·coun· try is $281,000,000,000 in debt. The long-faced statesman seems to be spreading his contern around over a large area and is unable to determine just where his duty lies. A small victory for the legions of decency; The Texas State Teach­ers Association flatly refused to de·segregate. the subversive activities of the Fund for the Republic. · This generous and patriotic gesture on your part will generate within you a feeling of pride and self·respect which you cannot possibly experience so long as fellow travellers, Communist Fronters and others of questionable loyalty are the sole recipients of your endowments. The shifting of your sympathy and influence to the cause of Amer· icanism and the contribution of your resources and treasure to incor­ruptible Americans who are immune to the blandishments of Commu~ nist propagandists and whose collaboration with foreign conspirators could not be bought at any price, will lift you to new and exalted heights of self-approbation from which you will be forever barred so long as ~~lfs. subversives and suspected traitors grace your Foundation pay- 1 All this I ask in behalf of the memory of the first Henry Ford who~e .brains, energy and initiative provided you with your chief claim to dishnction and whose unchallenged loyalty to his country reflected ~;1 ir~~;~i~=~~81~f;' ~t~:l~~TS!~;~~~~0n;': being dragged in the mire Very respectfully, Ida M. Darden, Editor, The Southern Conservative. Janua ry, 1956 THE SOUTHERN CON S ER VATI VE Page l Another Federal Judge Goes To Bat for the Moscow T earn May Be Like Trying A Burglar Before A Jury of Safe-Crackers The Communists have scored anothe r victory by grace of a rul­ing by one of t he Kremlin 's in­numer able b uddies presently sit­ting on the F ederal bench in the American j udicia ry system. A Federal Dist r ict Judge of Boston hit a home run for the Moscow team when he acquitted one of t h e ch aracters accused of contempt of Congress following his exposure as a self-admitted Communist when h e refused to tell the McCarthy com mittee of other Communists operating in defense plants in the United States. The person cleared by this amazing ruling was one Leon J. Kamin who was a Harvard re­search assistant and who at t he time of his exposure was working on a d efense p roject. This screwy decision perhaps tops th e wh ole category of cock - d~~n f;:;~n~e F:~:~a~yben~~n~~~ p h asizing the righ t of subversives to work unmolested at t heir ap-­pom ted task of overthrowing t he American governmen t. Baldly :-ejecting all the pre­cepts of self-preservation and re­pudiatmg the p r inciple t hat an American public official is swor n to perform in defense of the Re­public, this Judge ruled that Sena­tor McCarthy of Wisconsin acted "outside the jurisdiction of his committee" when h e probed into t he matter of Com mu nist s in American defense plant s. In other words, a member of a committee of the American Con­gress has no right to inquire into s ubver sion nor to expose the in­fil tration of en emy agents in Am<>rican Institutions. In effect. the j udge's invitation to Communists seeking the over­throw of the American govern­ment is definite and to the poin.t r e might just as well have said openly: 11Com e on in boys, the water's f.ine". LANDY HAS FELLOW FEELING FOR ONE OF HIS OWN KIND Eugene Landy, the lad who was first refused a commission in the Navy because his mother was a Communist and later got one any way, says in a newspaper interview that Robert 'M. Hutchins is "one of the free men in our time." Landy wrote Hutchins a long, com­plimentary letter which was carried by the Associated Press following Hutchins statement that there "are different degrees of membership in the Communist Party." Hutchins, ac­cording to Landy. performed a "cour­ageous act in taking a stand in de­fense of those who have joined the Party in certain degrees." Most Americans may think the youngster is a little presumptious in breaking out in print with such as­sertions but, after all, who wouldn't be a little cocky if he had been re­fused a commission because of Com­munism in his family and then had the distinction of having the big boss of the Navy go over the heads of the Board who turned him down and give him a commission. regardless Personally, we prefer to think that Landy is not typical of Navy person­nel which is comprised of the flower of young American manhood. Puny Crooner Puts in Hennings and Johnston Are Playing Cheap Politics Plug for the Pinks We are indebted to Mr. J . C. Phil­lips of Borger, Texas, for in!onnation about some direct propaganda in a motion picture titled "The Tender Trap" featuring Frank Sinatra and Debbie Reynolds. Mr. Phillips is one of the most alert and patriotic Amer­Icans in the whole United States and little in the way of Red propaganda escapes his eagle eye, Most Americans are familiar with the situation in the Scarsdale, N.Y., public schools and the victory of Communist sympathizers in the fight to control them. In this movie, Miss Reynolds announces that she plans to raise her family in Scarsdale to which Sinatra replies that she has made an excellent choice as the schools in Scarsdale are among the best in the country, or words to that effect. We· wonder if the concave~chested crooner was paid extra for that little propaganda contribution or if he just followed the script without knowing -what he was doing, and mouthed the stuff which had been put in by the experts. An intelHgent, alert and propa~ ganda-consdous actor would have re~ fused to be a party to such obviously Red-inspired material. From an author of stories and books on wild life in Western United States: "You can come nearer saying what I want said than any writer I ever read. I thank God that there are many throughout the country who agree with you 100 per cent as I do. May God direct your way along the path which all true Americans are going to follo w," Senator Joseph R. McCarthy o! Wisconsin says that he will fight to cut off funds of two Senate sub-com­mittees, one headed by ThomaS' C. Hennings of Missouri and the other by Olin D. Johnston of South Caro­lina. The Wisconsin senator says his op­position to the continuance of these two committees is based on the fact that they are "doing a tremendous disservice" to such security programs as we have left. He is exactly right about it and aU of his colleagues who have a sense of responsibility for the public welfare, will do likewise, and vote against any further granting of funds for the operation of these sub-committees. Both Hennings and Johnston are feather-weight politicians with' no scruples whatever against using tax­payers money for the selfish aims of the decadent political party to which both belong. Johnston's efforts in con­nection with the committee has been limited to attempts to prove that Democratic Fair Dealers are more capable of running the government than Republican Fair Dealers. Hen­nings has confined his activities on this committee to efforts to find means to protect the civil rights of Com­munist !ranters who belong to organ­izations committed to the overthrow of the American government Neither committee is worth its salt and should be abolished, and the cheap politics being played by Hen­nings and Johnston stopped immedi­ately, if not sooner. Eleanor Roosevelt, who has already endorsed Adlai Stevenson as her preference on the Fair Deal ticket now says Earl Warren is the best bet for the Republicans, That cinches what we have thought of War ren all along Constitutional Lawyer Claims the 14th Amendment Never Legally Adopted In dictating the ruling on segrega­tion to members of the Supreme Court, Gunnar Myrdal the Swedish Socialist, may have stepped on his own beard and got his lip caught in the wringer. Apparently he advised the Court to drape the decision around the 14th amendment to the Constitution of the United States which some of his Com­munist aides in this country had call­ed to his attention but which eminent authorities in the South are now claiming was never legally adopted. According to the United States Code, Annotated, Part 3, Amendment 14 to Amendment 19, the 14th Amend­ment was proposed to the Legislatures of the several States by the 39th Con­gress on June 16, 1866, and declared thro~gh Proclamation by the Secre­tary of State on July 28, 1868, to have been ratified by the Legislatures of 30 of the 36 States. However, it is pointed out that there were actually only 25 States having representatives in Congress at the time the 14th Amendment was sub~ mitted, the 11 Southern States not being represented there. Since they had previously seced'ed and become mem be is of the Confederate States, they were merely conquered pro­vinces awaiting clarification of their status when the Amendment was pro­posed. "If there were 36 States of the United States when thJs amendment was proposed by the Congress and only the representatives of 25 States sat in the Congress at the time, then it is obvious that two-thirds of the 36 States' senators and representatives did not join in the proposed Amend­ment" declared a lifelong student of the Constitution, J. R. O'Danlel of Fort Worth. "As to three-fourths of the States ratifying the Amendment, it is an established fact lhat the Southern States during t hat period of Recon­struction were not their own free agents but simply Military Despotisms under the rule of the United States government with the threat over their heads that if they failed to go through the motion of ratification of the 14th Amendment, they would not be restored to their State sovereign­ties and representation in Congress. In their pretended ratification they were acting under constraint, compul­sion and duress." As this Constitutional lawyer sees it, therefore, there are two reasons why the Amendment was not legally adopted: First, only 25 of the 36 States were represented when the Amendment was submitted and it was ratified by only 16 of the represented States and 11 Military Despotisms, second; since the Military Despotisms ratified the Amendment only under threat, their actions were null and void. Any way, we predict that the Amer­ican people are going to hear a lot about the subject in the months ahead and that they will learn that a lot of skullduggery went on among those who governed this Land of the Free and Home of the Brave back in the Sixties just as it does in Washington today. Early in this session of Congress, Senator James 0. Eastland and Congressman John Bell Williams, both of Mississippi, will take the floor in the Senate and House, re­spectively, to find out how m uch su pport for Constitutional govern­ment is to be found among duly elected representatives of the American people. The principal issue which will be presented will be the "Black Monday" decision of the Supreme Court on segregation, an infraction committed by the high court of such dangerous proportions that our whole system of government is jeopardized, Congress will be to ld. The Mississippi solons will point out an established rule of law which a ll members of the Congress should know but probably don't anJ that is that the Supreme Cou:tt has no power to make a decree by judicial decision which would have the effect of an Act of .=:on­gress, and neither does the Court have the power to do by judicial decree or fiat that which it has declared that Congress itself does not have the Constitutional right to do. The proper claim wiU be made that only the State legislatures have the right to amend the Con­stitution as provided in that docu­ment but which the Court, with the help of a Swedish Marxist, sought to accomplish through judi­cial decision. How much understanding of American organic law as repre­sented by the Constitution can be pounded into thick Congressional h eads who have seen one Cons ti­tutional provision after another violated in recent years, is any­body's guess. The only th ing that seems f a ir­ly certain is t hat Mississippi, home of the two lawmakers who will bring up the issue, is not going to abide by the Court's decision and mix white and black children in public schools period. When his country defeated the "package deal" for admitting Soviet satellites into the United Nations, Chiang Kai-Shek proved that this country has one responsible person looking out for the interests of the United States in that rotten outfit. Another Federal J udge swung into line when Ben Connally of Houston, son of "Long Tom," came right along like a little man and ruled that Negroes may eat in the white cafeteria at the new Harris County Court House. Yes sub, Boss! Tax ro4:_s: in Connecticut are being revised and the people of that State are looking forward to the payment of less taxes as a result of the ex­tensive flood damage in that area. If it is going to require an act of God to secure tax reduction, maybe other States had better start praying for floods. In keeping with the secret agree­ment made by Roosevelt, Alger Hiss and Harry Hopkins with Stalin and Molotov, only a Russian Communist is to fill the position of United Na­tions Secretariat in charge of all military activities. To date, only three have held this position, Arkady A. Sobelov, Konstantin Zynchenko and Ilya Chernyshev who is currently acting in that capacity. What mar­velous statesmanship this country has enjoyed for the past twenty ~ five years!!! lllage 4 The Southern Conservative A MONTHLY PUBLICATION OF EDITORIAL OPINION WITH NATIONAL CIRCULATION IDA M. DARDEN, Edao, Editorial Offices Flatiron Building Fort Worth, Texas Phone FA-2089 Price $5.00 Per Year !hery p11id subscriber is entitled to one freesubu;ription tobesentto11nyperson ofhilehoosing.) Sent without eo'! to members of Congress, memben of St11te l egisletures, Governon, ,ndothe rp.;blicoffiei11ls. A helploss sparrow can drift with the r·ind but it takes an eagle to fly against the storm. THE TENTH AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATESo The powen not delegated to the United Sta~.,, by the Comtitution, nor prohibited byitto - theStatesarereservedtothe Stetesrespectively,ortothepeople. George Urged to Retire in View of Almost Sure Defeat Friends of the Honorable Walt­er F. George, senior member of the Senate from Georgi.a, are re­ported to be advising him to re­fuse to make another race for that office in view of Wh3t they be­lieve to be almost certain defeat by Georgia's popular former gov­ernor, Herman Talmadge. Senator George has rendered in­valuable service to his State and the nation during his long service but in recent years he turned a flip and landed in the internation­alist camp. Like his illustrious tal­league, the late Arthur Vanden­burg from Michigan, he was un­able to overcome the ambition to become a world figure and help mold the destiny of the universe rather than concentrate on the safety, security and well-being of the United States alone. Both men were statesmen ·in their prime but in the evening of life they were betrayed by the siren voice of the internationalists and one-worlders, thereby cancel­ling out their usefulness to their own country whose sole interests they were pledged to serve. From a former Judge of a Court in Missouri: "As you say in your editorials, many Ameri­cans are enlisting in the effort to save this country with eaeh passing day and many good arti­cles come to my desk from time to time. But I maintain that no American journalist can touch you in the matter of the superb and brilliant writing you are do­ing in behalf of this be!eagured Republic of ours." Personally, we positively refuse to support any candidate fo~ President as the "lesser of two evils". If the two conventions per­sist in naming a Republican Soci­alist and a Democratic Socialist, we are not going to vote for either one but will write in the name of Titus Moody. THE SOUTHERN CONSERVATIVl January, 1956 Virginia Paper Reflects the Former When Defeat Is Pictured as Prestige and Glory of Fourth Estate More. Glorious Than Victory We have heard many expres­sions of surprise concerning the action of the very left-wing Ladies Home Journal in publishing, in their December edition, a blow­by- blow account of Adlai Steven­son's lost campaign for the Presi­dency in 1952 as written by his sister "Buffie". The Richmond, Virginia, News Leader, o.f w.hich. Dav~d Ter:nant Bryan is pubTisher and James Jackson Kilpatnck IS editor, 1s leadmg a fight in the South for the restoration of Constitutional government which is reviving much of the glory and the prestige of the F~u.rth Estate that has been somewhat tarnished in recent years as the pohhcal morality of the nation has deteriorated.' In earlier days of the Republic the public press was a strong and po­tent factor in shaping sound national policies, ~n prbvidi.ng a foru:n for the discussion of major issues of the day and m promotmg the highest ideals of statesmanship by riding herd on the official performance of the leaders chosen to represent the· American people in the nation's capital. Today, the American press, with notable exceptions, is largely slanted both in its reportorial and editorial departments and is little more than a mouthpiece for big advertisers and small politicians who shape its uncertain and w~"'ering editorial policies which are keyed to the exigencies and expediency of the moment. The Richmond News-Leader, in its magnificent protest against the encroachment of the Federal government on the rights of the States is reproducing some of the historic documents of the past which kept the Ship of State firmly anchored to fundamental principles on whi.ch the Republic was founded, during times of great national stress, emergen­cies or political mal-practice by weak and corrupt national leaders. In keeping with the shibboleth on its mast head taken from Section 15 of the Virginia Constitution "That no free government, or the bless­ing- s of liberty can be preserved to any people but by a firm adherence to justice, moderation, temperance, frugality and virtue and by frequent recurrence to fundamental principles", the News-Leader is now re­printing such documents to inform its readers of the strong measures adopted by a courageous and determined citizenship in an earlier and happier era to thwart despotic and tyrannical acts of Federal agencies and officials; Its editorial pages of November 21 , November 22. November 28 and ~ovember 29 , 1955, have been incorporated into a soecial supplement which is now being widely circulated throughout the South, for the purpose of reviving a Constitutional doctrine "old in the history of this country, but new to our own generation". In this supplement will be found the Kentucky and Virginia Reso­lutions of 1798-99 in protest a~ainst the Alien and Sedition Acts, Inter­position as the Basic Right of States bv the _great John C. Calhoun, a tentative draft of the Virginia Resolution of 1956 through which the South now plans to recapture its lost Soverei!{nty, and many pages of other sound reading which the citizens of this generation have never before been privileged to view in one assembling. Re-prints of the supplement are available on reQuest to the editorial offices of the Richmond News-Leader, Richmond 13, Virginia and it is only when the information therein has been assimilated that thoughtful Americans can appreciate the low estate to which the administration of the American government has fallen. Supreme Court Comes to Should Cattle Be Held as Rescue of Negro Rapist Superior to Human Beings? In an action which people of the South are praying does not become a trend, the Supreme Court in De­cember rescued a Georgia Negro sentenced to die for criminally as­sauJting a white woman. The President is said to have as fine a herd of black Polled Angus cattle on his Gettysburg farm as is to be found in this country. These animals were given him by admiring friends and well wishers and the President is said to be very proud of these register­ed cattle of pure strain which he keeps to themselves in fenced en­closures. This is intended as no criticism of the sister for her very eloquent t:ibute to Mr. Stevenson but ra­ther to point out the unusual cir­cum! i;tance in which a national magazine 'exalts a loser who was counted out in the first round. It is much on the same principle as glorifying a prize figt-ter after his opponent ha~ knocked him through the ropes. We, of all people, can under­stand and respect the undying love and devotion of a woman for her brother but what seems to be mystifying to many is why the Journal would give such an un­precedented amount of space to a man who, with one exception, took the worst drubbing of any candidate for President in the his­tor~ of organized government. It has been facetiously suggest­ed that since Adlai was portrayed by "Buffie" as absolutely irresisti­ble to women, great swarms of whom she practically had to shoo off with a broom, perhaps some of the ·charming lady editors of the Journal also have a crush on him thereby giving him the inside track with that powerful publica­tion. Could be. Mr. Bert McKe1·cher of El Paso, Texas, is an estimable gentleman of seventy-five who still acts as accountant for an El Paso busi­ness concern. Throughout the years we have been the 1·ecipient of letters from. Mr. McKercher in which he heaped prais€ on us by indicating that we were almost in a class with his favorite writer, Westbrook Pegler. Lately he broke down and wrote us that he has decided that we are even better than Pegler. We hope Mr. Pegler does not become di scour­aged over the fact that we have 1·eplaced him in the affections of on~ .of his fans, and give up his wntmg chore, because he is one of our favorite columnists, too. The Court held that the Negro's "rights" had been violated and the judicial genius who wrvte the unanimous opinion - which was based on the technicality that there were no Negroes on the Georgia jury that convicted the Negro criminal-was Tom Clark. Now we are beginning to suspect that the ~ct of the University of Cfiicago eggheads in "bugging" the jury room during a session of a Kan- We think, however, that in view G ~{ ~~x~~~a~n°~h!h~!~i>j:~~ ~u~~ ::~el;a~e :~:~kmo~Y a11:~n:~v~f %~~ ~ Cl~rk is a former Texan who left the State along about 1936 while under investigation by the Texas Senate in connection with "hot oil" operation in East Texas. Under the New Deal his advance­ment was rapid. Tom Connally got him a job as assistant Attorney General. Later Truman named him Attorney General and finally a member of the Supreme Court. It was not revealed in the Court's decision whether or not Gunnar Myrdal of Stockholm, Sweden, was consulted before the ruling was handed down. T h e Southern Conservative does get around and no fooling. During December, we "had re­quests for copies of the November­December edition from Ireland, England and the Arab section of Jerusalem. beings, he should be equally soli- l~v~ng mtellectuals but was a pre­citous in preventing "discrimina- · ~1mmary bout to an attack on our tion" in his livestock pens. JUry system. In December another in-c/ fo~if~=~~ht~~f~o~r:, ~h~~~J'r~~~ ~~n;~~~i~a~u;:::~s~;~ht=~e~n~~~:~ the swimming pool and the golf man of Tallahassee, declared that the course. it should be equally wise American system of trial by jury, procedure in the barn yard. cherished as a fundamental right by We hope, therefore, that in the normal Americans, "is an outmoded interest of consiStency, the Presi- relic of the 13th Century and is not dent sees fit, without benefit of a appropriat~ for present-day adminis­high Court decision, to add a few tration o! justice." Maybe the Jury Holstein bulls, several Jersey hei~ system is the next target of at{ack in fers and a number of strays of un- the attempt to overthrow the Ameri· ~:;d~mined breed to, his prize can governing processes. Otherwise, his black Polled An­gus cattle may resent being "segre· gated" in a pasture by themselves and become frustrated and rebel­lious over their status as "second class citizens" of the bovine world. Straw in the wind indicating the State of the Union: He1·bert Lehman gave the Stephen S. Wise award to Elmer Davis for "cour­age, consistency and clarity in defending civil liberties". January, 1956 THE SOUT HERN CONSERVATIVE Page 5 Program for One-World Government Will More and More We Wonder Be Legacy of the President's Successor How Murphy Got That Way All the speculation and guess­ing about whether or not Eisen­hower will run for re-election in the coming campaign seems point­less to us. What does it matter? If be doesn't, a man will be nomi­nated by the Republican Fair Dealers now in control of the par­ty with his same o~e-'Yorld vi~w­point and concern m mternahon­alism, as opposed to American security and well-being Personally, we do not thi11k he bas any more intention of rwming than we have and, in our op:nion, he and those closest to him have known this from the first and are merely postponing pub 1 i c an­nouncement in the interest of po­litical considerations and expedi­ency and in order to have unified support lined up for the candidate of their selection. Also, the longer his decision is withheld, the better his chances to advance the legislative program for Federal control of schools, in­tegration of the white and black races at all levels, increased soending of taxpayers' money through foreign aid, breaking down existing bars in our immi­gration law, the socialization of medicine and all the ather neces­sary steps preparatory to proiect­in{{ the United States into a Soci­alist one-world government. a program now widely recognized as having been Mr. Eisenhower's major objective in accepting the nomination in 1952 and which has been materially advanced during his three years in office. Mr. Eisenhower in all likelihood will step down and out but his program for one-world govern­ment will continue if one Fair Deal Socialist is nominated by the Republicans and another by the Democrats as now seems likely. Only intelligent, dynamic and unified action by .. patriotic citizens of the Republic who constitute an actual, but silent, majority in this country can produce the miracle which must be performed if a man who stands for America first, last and always is to be pu_t in the White House. ------ The United States Needs a Revival of Old-Time Religion Concerned and thoughtful Ameri~ cans are becoming more and more con­vinced that one of the greatest needs of the Republic is a return to old-time religion, if Communism is to be wiped out in this country where it has a deadly stranglehold. We do not mean the kind of religion expounded by theological city~slickers who take their texts from the Com~ munist manifesto and who can't de­liver a sermon without slyly sneaking in a plug for world government, raci­al integration and all the other Mos­cow- inspired propaganda which the .National Council of Churches dishes We mean the kind of religion which we knew in this country before the Internationalists took over and which teaches the simple Christian princi­ples laid down by the Man of Galilee when He walked among men on earth. Our candidates for the Hall of Shame; the students of the Uni­versity of Iowa who staged the December "Beauty Contest", in that institution. Hutthins Outdoes Filth Amendment Communists One of the most revolting ex­hibitions ever staged was witness­ed during the appearance of Rob­ert M. Hutchins on the television program "Meet the Press" early in December. Although he was questioned rigidly by some of the most astute newspaper correspondents in the country, Hutchins absolutely re­fused to give. Mostly he just wrig­gled, twisted and squirmed. For evasion, equivocation and outright defiance. his perform­ance put the Fifth Amendment Communists who appeared before Congressional investigating com­mitees, to shame. Asked repeatedly about 'his views on whether or not Com­munism was a rr.enace and his published statements in the nega­tive, and whether or not he would employ a Communist it he knew such person to be a Communist. "t.lutchins hemmed and haw~d and see-sawed back and forth in long, rambling and technical disserta­tions about hypothetical questions hat firmly refused to answer the question. It is the first time we have ever seen the panel members of the show display impatience. disgust and contempt for a guest althou~h we have seen them put many, in­cluding some of our good friends, through the- paces. Hutchins' rudeness and total lack of courte­sy and cooperation with i1is hosts seerred to inspire in the members of the press an understandable feeling of loathing which most people in the listening audience must have also experienced. Hutchins proved by his behavi­or on this occasion that he is an uintellectual" in its most pervert­ed meaning and an ideologically dangerous person who, in the pub­lic interest, should be gently but firmly taken "out of circulation. Perhaps.' as a great Americ~n sug­gested m another connection, he should be gathered up in a butter­fly net. We wonder how many have no­ticed that the cover pages of the December editions of family magazines that used to carry re­ligious symbols to indicate Christ­mas and the Birth of Christ have now abandoned the custom. A strong non~Christian minority group which has been working for years to kill off Christianity in this country is reaping the re­sults of its propaganda, and how! On Wednesday, October 4th, the Communist Daily Worker car­ried a demand of the American Communist Party that the Eisen­hower Administration "adopt a new policy and protect the rights of the Negro people". What does the ·-:ommunist Party want the Eisenhower administration to do that it hasn't already done to show its exclusive concern in Ne­groes - line up aU the white peo­ple and ship them out of the coun­try? Isn't violating the Constitu- ~f;ht:nc~o~~~:J~;nge:::n':~!k:/ Somebndy Is All Crossed Up On This' Favorite Son' Deal A lot of publicity has been gen­erated by somebody about the pros­pect of Lyndon Johnson being nominated for President or Vice­President, as a favorite son of Texas. Taking their cue from planted propaganda, editorial writers· in many Texas dailies suggest con­stantly that this may happen and some of the weekly papers whose editors are uc:ua1ly more intel1i­gent, have made similar proph­esies. There is only one thing wrong with this line of reasoning and we regard it as our duty to point H out here. Lyndon Johns0!1 is not a favorite son of Texas. His recent endorsement of Fed­eral aid to schools which serves as a direct sho in the face of the voters in ::>. Stgte which has gone on record as unalterably opposed to this policy, has revived distrust of his political int:~rity which be­cz. me ,.,id~spre<td when he only mildly o..-otested Truman's theft of the ·Tidelands and when he develo'1ed lockiaw following the ~<t.star~lv insult to the oeoole of Texas bv the Supreme Court in its segregation ruliD.g. This editor has, within recent weeks, made two trips which cov­ered more than a thousand miles of territory in Texas and since we are known to be concerned in mat­ters political those with whom we come in contact soeak freely to us of current issues and personalities. If Johnson's position on matters in which Texans are vitally con­cerned, and especiall jf in the mat­ter of Federal Aid to schools, sets him out as a 11favorite son", then we have lost all power of deduc­tion or never had any in the first place. uProdigal Son" would be a more apt designation , in our hum­ble opinion. Over in Alabama, Gessner T. McCorvey former State Chairman of the Democratic Party before Socialists took it over, in a com­munication widely reproduced in the press of that State, strongly condemns pm·ty officials for re­quiTing a pledge to support who­eve1 · may be nominated for presi­dent and vice president. McCor­vey charged that the National Convention is made up largely of " big city political bosses of the North and East. Negro politicians from the slums of Harlem and every stripe of Socialist imagin­able". He served warning that the South, and especially Alabama, will only support a candidate who advo.cates segregation of the races. The most unfortunate official performances o; 1955, and which made the heaviest concessions to Moscow at the expense of Amer­ican pride, dignity and prestige, were the Geneva Conferences with the Chinese and Russian Communists, the Supreme Court ruling on segregation and the con- JF:::;a~~ryh~et~e;lst:::iJc!h~n ~~!~~ thirty-year reign of terror. All that is necessary for the triumph of evil i$ that good men do nothing-Edmund Burke. We seem to remember something about a report inade by Ray Murphy of the American Legion to the effect that UNESCO was in np way con­cerned in American schools, a report which the Legion itself repudiated later, in its entirety. How Murphy arrived at this con­clusion has been one of the most baf­fling questions of recent history since UNESCO's attempt to infiltrate Amer­ican schools with its subversive phil­osophy is of record in hundreds of Perhaps nothing is more revealing concerning the trickery of UNESCO sponsors in attempts to dominate American public school curricula than a statement by I. L. Kandel of Colum­bia Teachers College appeartng in the NEA Journal of April, 1946, in which he told of a neat little subterfuge em­ployed to get around a provision in UNESCO's charter: "For the present there is no provi­sion for the scrutiny of text books in the UNESCO C"onstitution on the as­sumption that they are matters within the domestic jurisdiction of the mem­ber nations in which the organization is prohibited from intervening," Kan­del wrote, but listen to his next line: "Under these conditions, each member nation, if it is to carry out the obliga­tions of itc: membership, has a duty to see to it that nothing in its curriculum, courses of study and textbooks, is con­trary to UNESCO's aims. This task has already been undertaken through voluntary activities in the United States ... " Murphy, together with his commit­tee, has already been completely re­pudiated both by the Legion and the informed public and has perhaps al­, ·eady suffered enough for the shame he brought on the great organization to which he belongs but there will perhaps always be a question con­cerning his motives and curiosity as to what incentives were offered him to manufacture a completely false record concerning a subversive and anti-American project like UNESCO. On page 284 of the Journal of the National Education Associa­tion, Vol. 35, 1946: uwe have made available to teachers the latest information r e g a r d - ing UNESCO and the United Na­tions", On page 285 of the same publication William G. Carr, then Secretary of NEA Policies Com­mission reminds teachers that the United Natio~ and UNESCO are merely tools which, like a spade, will only work when somebody works them and adds: uThe great job of American education ... is to teach b,oys and girls how to use the new -instruments which we have fashioned as best we could ~~acetha~o~~~~i0~f .. ~~,omoting More evidence that an open sea­son on Political Science Profes­sors should be declared, has been produced. A Dr. Jasper B. Shan- .... non of the University of Kentucky is credited with the statement that candidates for public office should be screened by psychiatric examinations, a n d especia!Iy. those of the South who have scruples against mongrelization of the races. We are tempted to suggest more drastic measures which should be taken in regard to Political Science professors to keep the breed from multiplying and doing any further damage to the American economy and to society at large. THE SOUTHERN CONSERVATIVE January, 1956 Federation for Constitutional Government Leads Nation's Conservative Revolt (From the Palm Beach, Florida, Post October 28, 19~5) Racial Strife Brings Hodding Carter to the Mourner's Bench Incredible as it seems, one good A new political party may have been born this. week. It could be a "third party" or, if it hews to the line on lhe pl'inciples laid down by Its sponsors and organizers, it could replace one of the present major par­ties. TheyCouldGofarther 'Give 'Em Hell!' thi,ng has come out of the vile and unspeakable decision of the Su­preme Court on segregation. Actually, It was not announced as a political party at all. Called the "Federation for Constitutional Gov­ernment," it consists so far of an advisory committee headed by John U. Barr of New Orleans. This com­mittee plans a nationwide movement to resist left-wing tendencies in gov­ernment. That is a solid foundation !or a new political party if we ever saw one. Oth,er announced aims of the organization also should have a wide appeal to millions of Americans who have watched the federal government drift deeper and deeper into social· ism. Among those aims are: (1) Preservation of the indepen· dence of the legislative, executive and judicial departments. (2) Preservation of the sovereign rights of the several states and of individual liberties, guaranteed by the federal constitution. (3) Securing the nomination of candidates for office who subscribe to these principles, and to resist the nominatlon of leftist candidates for President and Vice President and other offices. ( 4) Oppose the adoption of SO· clalistic platforms. (5) To seek in every honorable and legitimate way to prohibit the practices and counteract the effects and consequences o! executive agree· ments or orders, and of decisions of the federal courts and the U. S. Su­preme Court which have wrongfully abrogated, modified, or amended the provisions of the U. S. Constitution. At present the intention is to con­centrate on development of a strong organization in the South and ''then invite all patriotic individuals to join in." The nucleus of a strong Southern . organization Is already there, with the advisory committee including many congressmen, governors and other political and business leaders of Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, Missis­sippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas and Virginia. An organizational meeting is planned at an early date. Whatever results from this move­ment, it should have a salutary effect on the thinkint of leaders of both major political parties. It could well be a rallying point for real states­men in both parties who realize that the labels they wear often have no more difference in meaning than Tweedle Dum and Tweedle Dee. The "Federation for Constitutional Government," in our opinion, has the makings of a grass-roots political uP­rising long overdue. It is our hope that not too much stress will be laid on its regional origin; that it will, in- _, deed, become a national movement. It could reverse a trend that threatens to undermine the very foundations of the American way of life. (Since the above editorial was written the Federation for Constitu­tional Government met tn Memphis, Tennessee, December 28-29, 195!5, and perfected the organization along the lines laid down in the Post edi­torial. The new organization Is ex­pected to exert strong influence In poutical and economic matters as they affect the South), And Do Worse but We Can't Think How As al"ways on such occasions, the Honorable Sam Rayburn of Texas was the recipient of tributes on his seventy-fourth birthday at a big shindig thrown by some of his friends in Washington. "Mr. Sam" is undoubtedly be­lo~ d by many people in all stations of life. Many sound-think­jug and reputable Texans have maintained their personal regard and friendship with him through­out the years even though they lost respect for his political stability when he let Roosevelt persuade him to surrender his convictions as a Jefferson Democrat and be­come a full-fledged Socialist, from that day forward. Praise was effusive for the ven­erable Speaker of the House on the occasion of his birthday party and one slap-happy Fair Dealer from Oklahoma became so exuberant that he rose right up and an­nounced to all and sundry that Rayburn ''was the best qualified man in the United States to be president" and insisted that his party should nominate him. While the prospect makes us shudder, we must admit in all honesty that the St~te of the Un­ion, Socialist-wise, would be no worse off than it is right, now, at that. Here They Go Again With a New Angle If the Internationalists, the One­Worlders and other anti-American propagandists don't get us one way, they try another. Now, it's the Educational Tele­vision and Radio Center and the Joint Council on Educational Tele­vision to be conducted in connec­tion with one of the large "liberal" Northern colleges. The point is for educational pro­grams to be whipped up in big universities for transmission to stu­dents in smaller schools and col· leges, and even high schools, around over the country. When a Marxist is caught red­handed teaching Communism to students, it is possible to kick him out' but it is going to be pretty difficult to fire a television pro· gram. The movement is being financed by-you guessed it-the Ford Foundation which has just plunked down another little old $6,493,840 to start the project on its way. All honor to the grand old State of Virginia which, by an over­whelming vote of its cit~ens, has made its decision to protect its public school system from the dis­aster which the Supreme Court undertook to visit on the South through compulsory mixing of whites and blacks in the class- A shady past was fading fast And decent .people stood aghast To hear from Independence, Mo. The slogan of a soandso: "Give'em Hell!" His brow was dark, his mien unkind, His whole demeanor umefined When to the taunts on every side The vulgar little man replied: "Give'em Hell!" "But hold," they said. "Have you no shame? Too long you've played the scurvy game. You've done too much. Would you do more?" Back came the answer as before: "Give'emHelll" "You've made a hell of poor Berlin. Korea was a venal sin. MacArthur's treatment a disgrace." Replied the man with brazen "Give'em Hell.'' "Have you no principle to plead, No accent on a worthy deed, No pride in something worth the while." But still with cynic's baleful smile: "Give'em Hell.'' And thus in nineteen fifty-six A party is in such a fix It's leading figure is a man Whose program is no other than HGive'em Hell!" ElJis 0. Jones Washina:ton, D.C. The rioting, bitterness and racial hatred which this ruling has en­gendered all over the South, has smoked out Hedding Carter and caused him to throw up his hands and scream "Uncle." Hodding Carter is the small­town Mississippi e d i t or who achieved dubious renown by con­demning the South's 11treatment'' of the Negro. He made his pitch for "tolerance, racial unity and brotherly love" thr6ugh long articles dealing with tbe non-existent 11Negro Problem" which appeared in the Saturday Evening Post and other racially biased publications who were good at attacking "problems" that didn't concern them. Although none existed before, Carter has now discovered that we really have a "Negro problem'' in a big way and in a recent edition of the Post, he comes out swinging against those enemies of the South . to whom he formerly gave aid and comfort. In his Post article entitled "Ra­cial Crises in the Deep South." Carter admits that matters are worsening in his state and that a unew dreadful barrier is being erected between the Negroes and the whites." He pointed out the excellent race relations that prevailed before the Supreme Court decision and the progress that had been made in providing better health, education· al and living conditions for the colored people and added: "But now has come a foreboding inter­ruption of our purposefulness and amity." He puts the blame on the Supreme Court decision and the arrogant action of the NAACP in making threats against the South. All this, the Southern Conserva­tive pointed out long ago. Even The Soapbox Socialists who used ~=~fs~o~e:;ew!~~e~uth:~~~e ~~d~ to hold forth in the Bowery have dling of Eleanor Roosevelt and her ~~~~i~~~{ s~:~P~~a~:~:~~; ~~;' ~~= Commurtist-loving cohorts had re-pound the same theories from the suited in "erasing the broad and House and Senate. happy smile from the face of We envied the woman recently who won the $100,000 prize on television because she was an expert on Amer­ican folklore and had spent years studying the subject. We envied her, that is, untll we read where the tax grabbers In Washington snatched $72,000 of it away from her. That would have been hard for us to take. Southern Negroes and replacing it with a sneer of contempt." We told months ago of the reaction that would follow the arnly of Mulat­toes in the NAACP who swarmed into the South in Cadillacs and threw their weight around. And what we .haven't said about the Supreme Court since the day of the decision is so infinitesmal that it isn't worth recording. We note that the Fair Dealers Mr. Carter says emphatically have monopolies as one of the -that the old South simply will not subjects which will be brought accept integration, !ike H or not. up by them during the campaign. We said that too. Goody, goody; maybe this means they have realized that the big­gest monopoly, and the most vici­ous one in history has just been perfected with the merger of CIO-AFL. Something to think about; When ttintegration" in public schools is accomplished and some frail young white teacher keeps a big strong seventeen-year-old Negro boy in after school. "Let us not be discouraged be­cause our numbers may be small" says Mrs. M. Conan of Phoe­nix1 Arizona. "After all1 a mos­quito is small, too, but he sure wakes people up". Although he was slow ~atching on, we are glad that the Missis­sippi editor has finally seen the light and is ~pparently remorseful to a certain extent for his part in helping to stir up hatred and bit­terness in an area where none ex­isted before. However, ·we think that what is called for on his part now is an open mind, a closed mouth and a silent pen. In this connection, we are un­able to resist the temptation to resurrect a slang -=xpression which was regarded as bot stuff in the days when we were young and to suggest~ Mr. Hedding Carter that he "go way back and sit down., _J•_••_•~_._I9_56 ___________________T ~H~E s_o_u_r_H_E_R_N_ _c _o N_ SE_R_V_A_T_I_VE ______________________P •9_•_7 Re - Alignment of Political Parties in the United States Below Is a speech delivered by Circuit Judge M. 1\-f. :McGowan of Jackson, Mississippi, to a Civic Club in that State recently, Judge McGowan m a k e s some powerful arguments for a re-align­ment of political parties in this country which have long been ad­vanced by Senator Karl Mundt of South Dakota and other sound­thinking Americans--Editor. The most vital question before the people of the nation today is how may we turn back the tides of social­ism and so-called liberalism and in­sure the preservation of constitution­al government. Creeping socialism is not a theory or figment of the imagi­nation, but an ever present and even terri!ying evil that threatens our very existence. We have drifted so far that even the most stouthearted are pessi­mistic as to the possibility of our sur­vival. But unless you have been living somewhere in a cave, you are by now fed· up with empty rhetoric and pious platitudes, and should be ready for some blunt talk and practical sugges­tions on the subject. It is my studied opinion that our only hope of salvation is in a complete re-alignment of the political parties of the country. Be it remembered that I do not here advocate the formation of a third party, but a re-alignment of the parties we now have. Traditionally, we are a two party government. In fact, a two party form of government seems to be incident to the English speaking countries and the parliamentary form of government which they have evolved. I am not now advocating a departure from it. However, I had' rather have ten par­ties than to further endure the in­tolerable situation in which we now find ourselves. In England though sometimes roughly outlined, the two party sys­tem has persisted for almost a century or longer. There is on the one hand the liberal elements in some form or other. Presently, they have the Con­servative party and the Labor, or Socialist-Labor Party. It might appear an the surface that our own two party aystem. in our country follows the same general lines. This was true un­til several decades ago when phenomi­nal developments occurred in this country that threw our two party system Into a hopeless state of con­fusion. In England the name of the party signifies the political philosophy of the member or candidate. More than a century ago, against the English Conservative stood some form of lib­eral whig; the whig element grew into the Liberal Party of the great Glad­stone. For decades, the Conservatives under Disraeli and the Liberals under Gladstone battled for political emi­nence in England. Then near the close of the last cen­tury the socialist and labor forces be­gan their rise to power. The Fabian Socialist societies and the labor poli­ticians early joined forces, and their attachment was at first of course to the Liberal Party. But about the year 1908, they had grown sufficiently atrong to assert themselves, and at this time they stepped out and form­ed their own party, y.rhich persists today as the Labor Party or Socialist­Labor Party, and they are today one of the two powerful parties of Eng­land. The Liberal Party dwindled and died. Thus the two party system per­listed, It was a realignment by honest profession of political faith. The Eng­lish have at least _preserved' political honesty and integrity; we have not. Now in our country, the nameS of the two great political parties meant something until several decades ago. Then they signified the political philosophy of their members. Now, they signify nothing, but are mere empty emblems. This is of course due to the resurgence and growth of the socialist concept in our own country, and the .;;~velopment of what we now know as the Left Wing Socialist, or Socialist, or Socialist-Labor group in our own country, and its incuba­tion and growth within the existing parties, and refusal to step out under its own banner and retire to its own bivouac, as the same group did in England decades ago. Let no one be deceived. We now have three political parties in this country: The DemoCratic Party, the Republican Party, and the Socialist­Labor Party. This is due to the fact that the Socialist-Labor party has not had the honesty and integrity as did their forerunners In England, to with­. draw unto its own camp, stand upon its own merits and openly espouse tts own cause. They have chosen to· re­main within the parties, play both ends against the middle, conservative against conservative, and generally breed confusion and foster deception to the irreparable damage of the J!e­public. They have power without re­sponsibility; rule without obligation,. Furthermore, let no one be deceived into thinking that Left Wing Socialism is not a party, a political party, well etched and defined: a political philo­sophy, radical, resurgent and e£ficient to procure its own ends and to put into effect its own ideologies. Also no one should be deceived into believing that the labor end of the apparatus is just a group of working people seeking higher wages or better working con­ditions. As a political party or organi­zation wages and working conditions have little or nothing to do with it. The socialist-labor movement was well defined and powerful in England even before the Reform Act of 1884, before which time the average work­ing man was not even allowed to vote. It has always and is now supported by intellectuals, theorists and social planners. I want it understood that I am not here to criticize and demean any per­son or persons. Neither am I here to castigate Left wing Socialism as a political and economic philosophy, al­though its tenets are repugnant to me. After all, I have more respect for Norman Thomas than for the politi­ican, be he Democrat or Republican, who parades as a conservative and surreptitiously seeks the Left Wing Socialfst vote. I merely urge that they segregate themselves into their own party and march under their own ban­ner, As astounding as it may seem, for twenty years they have dictated to the conservative citadel of the nation, the Southland. The Left Wing socialists are deeply embedded in the political parties. They have practically seized control of one, and are heavily infiltrated in the other. With the minority and block votes they control, they are in position to practically dictate to the hapless politician of today. They threaten, intimidate and coerce the ofiice holder into doing things against which their consciences must certain­ly revolt. If we are to save our politi­cal ideals we must cut clearly loose from them and chart our own course, and a way must be found. Let us examine some of the crises with which we are presently confront­ed. Take the question of segrega­tion in our schools which is a matter of states rights and a matter in which we are presently so deeply concerned. 1 make the solemn and sincere pre­diction that if we do not cut entirely loose from the lett wlnr politicians, then segregation Is certainly doomed. You cannot play the political came with them in all respeeta except one-­se «Tegatlon. Serreratton Is only one of the phases of the tirht for Consti­tutional rovernment - important though It be. You can't comrade with a left wlnrer and stand aside when he Shades of Franklin Delano Roosevelt In New York recently, Secretary oi Health, Education and Welfare Folsom issued a public statement reminiscent of the Thirties when Socialism first began taking root in this country and Roosevelt set up the proposition that the weak and the incompete~t were more worthy of government considera­tion than the strong and the able. Folsom called on American busi­ness and labor to join government in pursuing vigorously "a policy of prevention and elimination of need", whatever that means. "We must renew our combined efforts to achieve for each person an ever-increasing measure of eco­nomic security, well-being and freedom from wantn this Republi­can Oscar Ewing told a meeting of the CIO-AFL which recently merged. ' Although Ewing - pardon us, Folsom - advocated a program in which the government would un­derwrite the expenses of the citi­zen from the cradle to the grave and perform every personal ser­vice for him t!xcept giving him a bath, the Socialist laborites later bitterly assailed the administration for which Folsom was trying to create votes. It was apparent from resolutions passed that the Union leaders pre­fer the Democratic brand to the Republican type of Socialism. attacks one certain principle you re­serve the right to defend. You can­not win with your enemies, We must break the bonds of political realty with the Left wtnr Soctallsb, or else segregation might as well be forrot­ten. The conservatives of the nation, and especially of the Southland, are being squeezed to death between the jaws of a giant nut cracker, which said jaws represent nothing other than our two venerable political parties. The floating party, the Socialist-Labor group, dangles the prize before their eyes- the prize for our destruction­millions of racial minority and block votes. It must be a delightful specta­cle indeed for Mr. Reuther and Mr. Kroll, etal. So I say to insu;e our survival as a free people, we must forthwith bring about a complete re-alignment of the political parties In this country. I have said we must find a way out. How can this be done? He who points up an evil should suggest a remedy. We must attack the problem from the opposite direction from that by which it was solved in England. In England the Socialist-Labor group, when t h e y attained sufficient strength, moved out and founded their own party. With us, they refuse to do So the Conservative forces of the country, those who believe in the pre­servation of Constitutional govern­ment, sponsored by som.e such group as the Federation for Constitutional Government, should put into the field a strong independent conservative candidate for President, The move­ment should have no local complexion. Its appeal should be nationwide, for there are millions in America thirst­ing for conservative lead'ership, The meeting should be held preferably without the South, and perhaps In one of the larger mid-western cities. Without a doubt, such a candidate would receive many millions of votes, and would carry a respectable num­ber of states. It might even upoQ the first election throw the election of the president into the House of Represen­tatives which would over night break the strangle hold control of the party politicians. Certainly within a decade, it would' result in a complete realign- Fired Subversives Bounce Back Like Rubber Checks Pending the adoption by the United Nations World government of a proposed 41COnvention" which will prevent anybody from mak­ing derogatory statements against anybody else at any time and which will prohibit the firing of anybody for any cause, we are doing pretty well here in this country without it. William Henry Taylor, assistant Director of the International Monetary Fund's Middle East De· partment and fo,·merly assistant to the late Harry White, Commu­nist spy in the T1easury Depart­ment of the United States, and who was fired from his job because of alleged facts which rendered him a security risk, has been vindicated by something called the tjinterna­tional Organizations Loy a 1 t y Board" an outfit that most Ameri· cans didn't know existed. The Board claimed that it had before it testimony which was not available when Taylor was dis­charged. Hereafter, if any department or division of our far-flung national or world government agencies want to fire anybody and have him stay fired. they'd better make sure before giving him the gate that he is not a Communist, fellow-travel­ler or other security risk. Otherwise, he's liable to come bouncing back like a rubber check. ment of the political parties of this country. As to which party or parties would be submerged and forgotten, would be a matter of utter insignifi­cance. The party of Gladstone has been forgotten, but Gladstone will never be forgotten. We would then at least have political honesty and in­tegrity, and everybody would know where the other fellow stood. England marched into socialism, but they did it with their eyes open and not by de­ception and indirection. Now they are trying to march out. They at least know how they got there and what it will take to get them out. That Ia more than we know. I said that millions of Americans are hungering for conservative and honest leadership, and this is true. t This was demonstrated in 1952. As to how well he who offered it carried through on his promise is a matter of individual opinion based on the rec­ord. It would. be inappropriate for me even to express my view as I am not attempting to make a political speech. The conservative forces, if properly organized and led can preserve segre­gation by legal means by forcing a return to the states of power rightful-ly belonging to them. I would like also in passing to com­ment upon what is termed the "mid­dle of the road" candidate some of us are so desperately seeking, There is no such thing. The Socialists want it all. It is merely another delusion. And some justify our consorting with the left wingers on the ground it will insure seniority for Congress­men and "party chairmanships". This could be no more than a temporary stop gap. This is mere political mani-b~ 1~~fi~ic~u~a;~;~lt:~o:.a~u~~ty ~!~ • of courage and bra very who never calculated the political consequences of their acts. I have said and repeat that the peo­ple are thirsting for conserVative and honest leadership, and that is true not only in the southland but all over the nation. There is a strong deep seated movement stirring among the people - a cry for conservative and' safe leadership. Shall they cry in vain for this while the timorous politician stands aside, "doubting in his abject spirit while his Lord is crucified"?" Page 8 THE SOUTHERN CONSERVATIVE Bitter Battle May Result White House Conference on Education Over Armed Services Bill Was Greatest Farce Ever Perpetrated WashJngton newspaper men reveal that a bitter battle is expected in the present Congress over the proposed armed services program. Washington officials make no effort to conceal the fact that enlistments are lagging to an alarming extent and the disinterest of young men in volun­teering is an open secret in the na­tion's capital. The reason o! course is not hard to come by, although no mention is made officially of the motive back of the reluctance of young Americans to come forward and o!fer their services In peacetime to fight potential wars of the future in unknown areas of the world. Chief amon"g these is the remem­brance of prisoners of war left in Korea to the mercy of Chinese Com­munists who failed to return them to this country in keeping with the terms of the Armistice; the possibility of being sent to a foreiin country minus the protection of the American Flag under the status of forces treaty which abandons them to trial by foreign courts in the event of -Commission of crime or misdemeanor and last, but by no means least, because of the mixing of Negroes and white men in sleeping and eating quarters. Where Have We Heard This Line Before? Now that the League of Women Voters has come out in its true colors, they are apparently decided to go right down the Party Line. The outfit's president, one Mrs. John G. Lee, said over a recent Columbia Broadcasting program: "Commtmism constitutes an un­deniable threat to the security of the nation but our freedoms are weak­ened each time we mistake dissent for Communism, each time we yield to the temptation to use or be in­fluenced by misrepresentation and "We fear Communism but are con­fused by the appearance of the con· cept or guilt by association and the pressure.s (or conformity". This well-meaning but inept lady simply has too many "bub" in her denunciation of Communism. Any true and unqualifiedly patrl· otic American Js against Communism without any "ands ifs or buts". They are against Communism. Period. uwe are heading into our 23rd deficit in the last 26 years" says the great economist, Henry Haz~ litt in News Week. "In the richest and most productive year in our history, with the most onerous taxation we have known until this decade, our Federal revenue still does not equal our Federal spend4 ing. That spending now runs to about $64,000,000,000 a year - twenty times the rate at which we were spending, say, in 1928. Yet the administration professes help4 lessly that it cannot cut thU down . • !' This tragic mis-man­agement of the government point. ed ou~ by Mr. Hazlitt stamps ours as a nation of morons governed by a band of criminals and if nobody can stop it, we deserve the fate .. which awaits the Republic. The average American seems to have no conception whatever of the fundamental fact that the Federal government does not have a penny except that which it takes forcibly from the taxpayers. Somewhere along the line they got the idea that money grows on trees along the banks of the Poto· mac and that all Congress has to do is to go out and harvest it like gathering persi~mons in a bucket. Our warning to parents in the November-December edition of the Southern Conservative to the effect that the White House Conference on Education would be stacked by stooges of the National Education Association in the interest of Federal Aid to schools was the under­statement of all time and didn't half prepare them for what actually happened. The Conference turned out to be the most flagrant and disgraceful performance ever staged in the way of alleged free and open discussion of a group of citizens called together to give consideration to a subject of vital interest to all the people of the United States. It was exposed by delegates who attended on the assumption that it was on the level, as the greatest farce ever perpetrated in the name of free discussion and "grass roots" participation. In direct contradiction of its sponsors' advance -::leun that the Con­ference would be composed principally of "laymen" interested in educa­tion, the professional educationists moved in·and took it over like Grant took Richmond. Of the approximately 1800 delegates in attendance, it is reliably estimated that more than sixty per cent were professional politicians in educational circles well versed in high pressure tactics and with long experience in lobbying educational bills through State legislatures and Congress. Not only did accredited delegates to the Conference have no voice and no vote in the proceedings but the ufinal report" of the Conference on Federal Aid is believed by many to have been written well in advance of the session, and the main objective 0f the Conference is now generally regarded as having been the ultimate C!ontrol of the Public School sys­tems of the United States by the Federal government through the medi­um of Federal Aid. The Conference now stands revealed as an all·out plug by the Na· tiona! Education Association, the National Citizens Commission for the Public Schools and the federal Department of Education for the multi­million- dollar Federal Aid program as advocated in the messages which the Eisenhower administration has sent, and will presently send, to the Congress. Of the twelve top chairmen writing the ureports" for the six topics listed for discussion at the top level, on the basis of two for each topic, nine turned out to be professional educationists, leaving only three ulaymen" in this category. These professional educationists were Dr. William G. Carr, born in England, and who has been the chief ramrod for NEA policies, in one capacity or another, since 1928 and who is author of the .revealing book "Education for World Citizenship"; Clayton J. Chamberlain, Superintendent of Public IOstntction in Honolulu ; James D. King, a local School Superintendent in a small Texas city; Elmer W. Rowley, Dean of Joliet Junior College in Illinois; Earl H. Beling, a "consultant" for the White House Conference; Mrs. Fred A. Radke, past president of the Washington State School Directors Association; Mrs. Ruth Page, State President of the Federation of District Boards of Education and, of all people, Pearl A. Wanamaker and Dr. Edgar Fuller, a couple of red-hot Federal Aiders and "plants" of NEA. Mrs. Wanamaker _was a former president of NEA and is currently State Superintendent of Public Instruction in the State of Washington while Fuller is Executive Secretary of the National Council of Chief State School Officers, a de· partment of NEA. .... As was to be expected, Wanamaker and Fuller turned up as the two top dogs in issuing the ufinal reportjJ on the topic of Federal Aid, al­though we were told that the affairs of the Conference would be han· died mainly by "laymen". However, there are probably a lot of red faces in NEA now over their choice of the Wanamaker woman. Since the Conference ended she has received nation·wide publicity through press and radio for reinstating the back pay of a Margaret Jean Schud~ dakopf who had been suspended from her school couriselor job at Ta· coma, Washington, for her refusal to tell the House Un-American Activi­ties Committee whether or not she had ever been a member of the Com­munist Party. The Schuddakopf woman is the sister of the notorious George Shaw Wheeler who is now voluntarily behind the Iron Curtain. Nice people! Summed up, th~ Washington Conference on Education was a rigged affair and designed solely to whip up interest in the plan for the Fed­eral government to take over the schools and to impress members of Congress with the widespread demand for Federal Aid in ord~r that they would vote accordingly. , However, the Conference has been so thoroughly discredited and its arbitrary methods of procedure so widely exposed that it now ap­pears that it will serve the opposite purpose and bring about the defeat of any proposed Federal Aid legislation, although at the drinking party at the close of the session at the Sheraton Park Hotel, NEA representa­tives were overheard congratulating each other on having 11put one over" on the country boys and girls attending the Conference, and ex­pressing the belief that Federal Aid legislation was in tho bag. January, 1956 A Heart That Bleeds For Commies Alone Practica1ly no one was surprised at the shocking performance oi Elea­nor Roosevelt during the Christmas holidays when she joined with Nor­man Thomas and fourteen other Com­munist ·lovcrs in petitioning the Pres. ident to release the Communist crim­inals (rom prison who were convicted of plotting the overthrow of the American government. Pleading the cause:: of Communists has always been her favorite indoor sport. She wanted these scoundrels re­leased in order that they might spend Christmas at home with their fam­ilies although she well knows that · they have no respect for, nor belief in, Christmas nor the Christ whose birth the event commemorates The Roosevelt woman has a heart which often bleeds for suffering hu­manity but, strangely enough, none of her sympathy is wasted on patriot· ic Americans. They could rot and die in prison for all she appears to care, but let a Communist land in the clink and she is Johnnie-on- the-spot beg-ging l"or his release. Captain Eugene Guild of Glenwood Springs, Colorado, on the other hand is a good American patriot who lost a son in the Korean Police Action and who has spent his full time since that tragic event in a relentless effort to secure the release of young Amer­icans still held by Red China bandits. When she made her dramatic plea for the release of the criminals who worked for the overthrow of the United States government, Captain Guild addressed a letter to her w should have caused her to hang her head in shame but probably didn't. Captain Guild pleaded with her in these words: "Having petitioned Pres. ident Eisenhower to tree the Ameri~ can Communists who plotted to over­throw the American government, no doubt you will also have the compas~ sian to petition Mao Tse Tung to free all the Americans he holds, including the heroes who fought for America'• freedom." Naturally she has not answered Captain Guild and there is no chance that she will. To misfortune and tragedy which befall those other than Communists, she seem.s to be as cold as a pawnbroker's heart. Top officials of five Southern States are taking strong measures to defy the Supreme Court's un4 constiutional ruling on segrega4 tion. That Texas is not among them threatens a heart-breaking disruption of some deeply-rooted political loyalties and ties of long standing, according to current political gossip. Owen Lattimore who escaped prosecution for lying to a Con4 gressional Committee concerning his Communist associations has broken out with a denunciation of u. S. policies in Asia. Because of his narrow escape from a pos~ sible prison sentence, most people had thought, and hoped, that they had heard the last of him. In Houston recently there was a complete clean-out of uliberals" from the City Hall and an entire Conservative. Council elected. The former administration had em­ployed Gould Beach, a profes­sional racial deviate whose speci4 alty is mixing whites and blacks on aU levels to organize Houston Negroes, but the Conservative slate was elected overwhelmingly with an all-white vote.
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