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The Southern Conservative, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1952
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The Southern Conservative, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1952 - File 001. 1952-04. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 12, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/southern/item/567/show/558.

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(1952-04). The Southern Conservative, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1952 - File 001. The Southern Conservative. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/southern/item/567/show/558

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Southern Conservative, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1952 - File 001, 1952-04, The Southern Conservative, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 12, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/southern/item/567/show/558.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Southern Conservative, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1952
Contributor
  • Darden, Ida M.
Publisher Southern Conservative
Date April 1952
Language English
Subject
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
Place
  • Fort Worth, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 10604411
Collection
  • Houston Metropolitan Research Center
  • Ida M. Darden Collection
  • The Southern Conservative
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Houston Metropolitan Research Center.
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript OUT RN ' IH. 34.66 P.L.&It. U. S. POST AGI PAID Permit No. 1665 Fort_ Worth, l'exas -To plead lor a return of Constltut·ional Go.,erntnent- \rol. 3 Fort Worth, Texas, April, 1952 N 4 ------------------------------------------------~--~~~--~------------------------------------~0. -------------------------------- ~ Senior Senator From Texas Takes Exit Cue And Bows Gracefully Out Of The Picture Senator Tom Connally of Texas has~--~ r---------------. ~ouowed the example of ~he presi- People Decide the Case of de·nt and has announced that he will T M DOt be a candidate for re-election. ruman YS. acArthur .' Thus two of the main targets of those of us who are fighting for a ~turn of Constitutional government bave been removed through their own wlition and without benefit of action by the voters. · As in the. case ()f Harry Truman, triends of Connally are seeking to plaee a halo on the senatorial brow .nrl to ~QaVQ around him an aura of i'feat w1sdom, .statesmanship and de-f. otion to duty seldom equalled by a 1ervant of the people. In fad, one large Texas newspaper •ditorially listed his achievements throughout t•he years with such ex­travagant praise and panegyric en­comiums that we had to keep remind­tug ourself, as we read, that the article related to the senior senator f,rom 'I' ex as. It brought to mind the old story of ~e new preacher who was called on ~ deliver his fii'ISt funeral service ln his new pastorate. The dead man had been a person of doubtful virtue fin life but wishing to make a good ~pression on his flock, the minister t&t out all the stops and invested the cleparted with such spi·riiual and moral quali-ties that, on its conclusion, ~e widow leaned over and whispered to her oldes-t offspring: uson, you better take a peek and JJl-ake sure it's your pa in that cof· fin". For the occasions-and they have been many-when he acted in the t>e31 intere-sts of his State and nation, ~e senator is entitled to full eredit and gratitude of the people and we cbeerfully add our expressions of ap­predation, although this course ·Of of· ficial conduct is pre-supposed when an elected representative takes his oath of office. For those occasions - and they bave been more-when he has allow­ed himself to be influenced by left­wing leaders and led into action which w~as opposed to the welfare of Texas and the Republic, we have expressed oondemnation and the people of his $tate have shown their disapproval by lining up for his opponent. We Wish the senator many calm tnd peaceful years in the twilight of life and sincerely hope that whoever $\l.Cceeds to this high office will emu- As Harry S. Truman leaves the White House in January and returns to the anonymity from which he sprang, the avengiilg shadow of a man he wronged and humiliated be­yond reparation, will walk by his side. For, regardless of any reason he publicly gave for refusing to accept renomination by his party, he knows in his heart that his action was in­spired solely by his realization that ho oo-u.l.d "D-ot. he el.ec'tcd a.ga.in Small men do not willingly surren­der unaccustomed power and author· ity once they have it in their gra$p and by any test ever devised for measuring human stature, Harry Tru­man is a small man. He knows that the reason his prest­ige has sunk to an all-time low and the voters have repudiated him in ad­vance of the convention, is not due alone to the unparalleled corruption which has attended his administration but also to his dastardly treatment of the greatest military figure of the ages. Americans were revolted at dis· closures of bribery, influence-selling and other assorted criminal acts by officials of Washington agencies, but their sense of justice, dignity and human decency was outraged by the unwarranted removal of General Douglas MacArthur from his com­mand. As Commander-in-Chief of the American Army, the president's direc­tive was the supreme law of the land, his authority was unchallenged and from his verdict there was no appeal, but in the Chancery Court of Public Opinion his decision was reversed and his order overruled. In the High Tribunal of American Sentiment, Harry Truman lost his case. Through the final judgment soon to be handed down at the polls, he knew that he, too, would be relieved of his command. late all his good qualities and avoid the grave errors into which he was led through an ill-advised sense of loyalty to two presidents of the Re­public who were irretrievably commit­ted to the social and economic policies of Karl Marx. The Founders of the Republic provided lawmakers with Constitutional authority which, if it had been exercised, would have prevented the little ward-heeler in the White House from "steering the nation to the brink of disaster. It becomes clearer every day, as the national situation shifts from bad to worse, that the founders of this Republic who wrote the Constitution of the United States were endowed with the gifts of foresight and prescience which enabled them to visualize the type of leadership with which we are presently cursed. To prevent or overcome such a catastrophe for the country they loved, they set up safeguards to protect the interests of the people and to keep the Republic intact against temptations of weak and corrupt leaders to betray and destroy it. To. this end, they set up separate and distinct branches of government with the duties of each specifically defined, but it was the legislative branch in which they vested the responsibility of maintaining our form of government and protecting it from assault by its enemies, without ana. Within. They placed this mighty and awesome responsibility on the legislative arm of the government because that branch was to be the direct representa­tive of the people and responsive to the people's will. They gave the legislative body authority to check on the Executive branch of the government and if this authority had been properly exercised during the last two ~ational administrations, our government would not now be hag-ridden with corruption, strikes, wars and every other evil which can assail an organized assembly of men. The weapons which the architects of the Republic placed in the hands of members of Congress to have and to hold and to forever use in perpetuating the American form of government and its immortal prin­ciples were the power to impeach, to override executive veto, to make treaties with foreign nations and to declare war. A review of legislative performance in Washington during the past twenty years reveals that our lawmakers have not only failed and refused to exercise this Constitutional authority in the interest of preserving our orderly processes of government but have actually surrendered their assigned powers to the Chief Executive. They have passed up time and again the opportunity to use their power of impeachment when the national welfare demanded that this step be taken. They have failed to pass legislation over the president's veto which was clearly in the public interest and which the president had failed to sign for reasons having to do with his personal political ambitions and with the perpetuation of his party in power. They have confirmed men to high and responsible positions in the government who possessed the mentality of a grasshopper, the ethics of a bank robber and the morals of a horse thief. They have given approval to treaties which were designed to destroy the United States as a sovereign nation and flonvert it into a satellite country of a Socialist world State. They have surrendered their power to declare war to a president who has employed it to the sacrifice of the lives of thousands of American boys in a vain desire to maintain a pretense of national prosperity based on an economy of defense spending and government-fed inflation. With governments, as with individuals, responsibility gravitates to those willing to assume it and it is because of the weakness. ineptitude and political cowardice of a majority of the members of our national law· making body that the Executive has usurped power which would have been denied him if strong men had stood guard at the portals of Congress. A president of the United States is only one individual but the Congress of the United States is a symbol, an institution and a way of life. Truman and all other leaders of his ilk will pass from the scene and their impact on history will be but a fly speck on the page of human events, but the Congress of the United States is the instrument by which man's capacity to govern in a Constitutional Republic is tested. With the most perfect machinery for the government of a free people (Continued on Page 2) Millions of ·Americans Think It--The Southern Conservative Says It April, 195! April, 1952 THE SOUTHERN CONSERVATIVI Pago__! Pogo 4 THE SOUTH[RN CONSERVATIVE April, 1951 The Southern 1111n~~~wll:~tilll~lw• ~ar People to Beg Fair Deal Lady Is !"The United Stales (an Foreogners to Accept the ,. Money w. Give Them Loyal Left-Winger Afford To Be Corrupt _ co~;0,::~1t;;c~o 0~h:o~:·;~~e:r18 ~ .. ;~~~:~;:; Mrs. India Edwards of Washington,_~- c., B~lieve it or not, fihis statement was ---------- in the senseless waste of American tax- Executive Director of the Women's D1v1sion publlc1y_ m~de f~om the !OStru~ of payers' money was emphasized, uninten- of the National Democratic Committee and l~e aud1tonum m a leadmg umver· tionally in a story in a leading national Joyal Left-winger for two decades, was in Slty ofTexas recent.ly to a group c~m­weekly '• short time ago Dallas recently to address the State con- posed largely ~f students attendmi ----------/ The 'artirle was writle~ to glorify 8 fe- vention o! the League o! Women Voters.~ ~~~i~~~itution m pursuit of an "~du, male gov_ernment employe and her work . Mrs. Edwards is a bat1le-axe whose head The .s·peaker was Professor Earl ----------/'"a fore1gn city where she was_sent as a 1s bloody but ~nbowed from many forays Pritcha,rd, Jist~d on the program as .a · telations person, and to pomt up the an~ campaign~ m b~~alf o( New Deal and "Specialist on Far Eastern Relations, o! our go\'ernment workers abroad. Fa1r Deal soc1al pohc1es. a Professor of History at the Univer .. ..... ~o~ltho11t c011t to ""•"'",. of Cong,ou, mombOft of Stoto loglllaturu, O..urnon, ettdothor,ubli•offi•iolt. The point was missed completely by the The lady with the under-slung jaw and . sity or Chicago, former editor ?~ 1\'le .,. author who wrote in a serious vein of the poodle dog hair-do i' quite an impressive ~ar ~astern Quarte~ly and military A holplott tporrow cu drift with tho wi~~td fine work of the young woman which con- personality and enjoys the unique but mtelligen,~e analyst m the War De .. but it tobt •• ••tl• t• fl, -e•i•ut th• ttorm. sisted, at the time he had prepared his dubious distinction of being one of the few partment · :=========~~ :;~~·tr~r ;~~~!:gs!c!a!o1::aete~~ople of the :~~in~ t!i::::e ::s~~:~f~~~ io:r~~:a!~rr!:~ g~v~~e 8~c~!io;e~~~s ~~~~f~~;~i~:~ • T~:/c:~~ti~u~i~:d':;"~h!0 Since ECA '"' • proje<t lor giving '"''Y ~~~~'1';';0;~~ ;;~~:~1 .~~~~~:~. .~ :~~h con- :r? ~~~ ;;;tln~~[~~e ~~e~~~;~gAW:i~~: United Stotes: the hard-earned money of Amencan tax- one of which was Professor Pritchard. U~~:d ~:,:;• b;0ihe d~~~~j;~~,:~, !~~ holy,. did"'':;. i~"~:·,;:;:d •:lo~~ ~~:'bl:~ re!:n~;i~:~:r:~:w,l~o~t";l,~~pne~w:~·~:~ :: seJ.~~l]\_~~-~i";:g c~~:~~Ji~i~stagl~o~t ~~~~~:,~~ ~\.::, •;:,P~:,-;:~~~~~'!r ',·~ ~·~·:~::··~~<::::~~~~ 1:.~!;hti~~ ~:~P~•o;h~ ;::~~:::.:.~~nth!~~.;.';1~~t:~di~P;:,1::~: ed 1 by ha question /~d ~nswer. ses~on. '------------'ling. ity should be spread out". fe:o; ~~ft~~~~% c~!u:lt,us;~a;:~rk~~ Legionnaires Fight Communism As Congressman Clare Holfman said on Not being quick on the draw, she had that the reason Chiang Kai-Shek was On the Entertainment Level the floor of the House recently: "Santa no recourse but to retreat as gracefully as discredited and lost control in China Claus has always been considered to be possible when an alert newspaper man and the reason we could not afford to The American Legion of the District of generous to a fault, but never yet have I asked her if she was advocating a "share- support him was because he had lev .. Columbia has started a movement which heard that it was necess.ary for him to the-wealth" program. ied exorbitant taxes against the peo-- "''e hope will become widespread within send flut paid representattves in order to . . ple and that his regime was corrupt. that organization. induce those to whom gifts were contem- She sard no, she dJdn't mean that and Ordinarily we are as timid as a field As a practical, down-to·earth effort to plated to accept those gifts." what. she meant to say wa~ that "every mouse when in the presence of more :!~~~. ~:;:,:~~:~: ;i~ke\~~ .a movi~g pic- an!ht~:t i~s ~~~~ ~~: :oeL~:~~~~:n t!o wbheo:a:.: :fm;;~C:r~u~~~~~.l.d have the rrght to dream ~~::e t::;;p ~~~/~~~er~6~p.a~e ifus~ ture house as a protest agamst the show- free donations had more character Pardon our stupidity, but we thought Sit and hsten a_nd then make a break ing or_ ''The D~ath of a ~alesman" with and political integrity than we, and had to Americans had enjoyed that right 5ince for our typewnter. . P'rf'dc_nc Ma~·ch m the leadmg role. be talked into be-coming a party to our de- 1776. 1 But the sheer audacity of the pro. Wh1le ordmarily we are opposed to pick· grading proposals. . . I fessor:s state_men~ brought us to o~r ;~i~~ei~.:;Y0/~~~·L:;i:~~~~r~!· i:t/eu;~~i~: he7~e;o~r~a~lrs; ~~~:~~~~m~:: ~:~~!s~o~vi~;: ~~~tsJ~~ a Jack-In-the-box with thii ;,~;nt:eco:~~i~i~~h~h~ro:eaogp~~d~/i~~;.~~s so- PubliC IS fnfifled TO ~;~e:t;ii;:t e:~::1 ~eo~;:~sn~~aJ;~:a:~:c!~~~ m;;:~~e~:;~~r;~~aC~iad;g Y~~i r~~~k eialism, communism and other alien ideol- Whal GOeS On Here !~~g;:esi~he:t.gap between pants peddler ~~~ot~e~t ~~a;!~~~~!x!~st~~ewceor~~;~ ~--~--~~~~~~~~~~~t ~f~-~~f~mffir~~~~~~------~----------f~M~eT~admrn~a~~ cwner from blame and pointing out that no~ncem~nt of ~smeeti~~ ~nrSaen An: ''The /ron Curtain aci':~ts~ct~~ ~i~P~~!~o~~dst~!lepa~~a~i the picket Jine was a protest only against tomo ear 1 Y m Apnl apparently and tolerant condescension of a teach· th~h~ic;::~o:n~a:h:~:O:I::e~p~~a~:~e:~i~~ ~~~'0~~~.~1j~n s~~~~~cyd!~~na:o~~~hii~~ Over America'' ~yl~g ~os~~~~v~~r a t~~i!~et~~~~i~does~ «lf broadening the movement to include any formation. College professors perhaps more than stupid pupil in cla.ss, the professor and all pictures which were written, di- According to one university pub- any group in the American economy have answered our question. rected, produced, or acted by Communist lication, the meeting was a seminar been responsible for the spread of Social- ~e explained t~at _corrupti_on in fronters, ''Firth Amendment" witnesses, or sponsored by Brookings Institute of ism and Communism in the United States. Chma and ~orru~tion m Washmgton any other un-Arnerican element, according Washington, D. C. and "The Sooth- . . . . are two entirely d1fferent matters. He to the Firlna: Line, an official Legion publi- ern Conference" and lasted three Bec~use of their posrtlon as guardians of pointed out that the people of China •etion. days. The names of three professors the mmds 0.f youth, t~ey are able to pro- h_ad so little that j_ust a lit.tle ~orrup- )le!:li: :h~c~~= ;!s~:Cr:i~e~;on!~:e~~:;i~~: :~~~~:nail f:~~~h~h~t a~~i~~~~~t~ t;e~: :;::g. ~~;i::~sn ~f t~oe;:1r::~ 0 :nd ~~:~::~~:~ ~~~~s ,~ev::~at;:gpr:S~~~~o~~ t~~: ;:~,~;!, h,:• r~::~t f~e:~:~ a:~hths:b~;~~:~ f:al1;,fit~i~~l i~l~ft~l;~.leanings polit- ~~~~on:1 c;~u;ut~~~~:~~~s.wlll 5way the de- ~~n a:: t~~!eh~~ :v~~~~~h~~g~o~~~rr »aires are bett qualified to dirett tuch a The article further stated that ex- While this rule of course does not apply more elaborate ~nd mvol.ved trea~- mo,•emenL rrts f1~m the n~tale ~;p!~t;n~~iie:~ !:p::!n::~ebe;; ::r:h!: ~;o~~:~~nat~~:ti:: ~~~~~~tt~~th~~~:~tlo~ ~~:~h~~n~~f , ~ w~~~~ ~ea7re~ent a~d that J?roblems of the public. so~~fnP~~:::words, the United Statf!..- = Southern D~,mocrah to ~·~~~d , of foretgn policy would be discussed. In this connecti~n, Dr. John o. Beaty, c-an afford to be corrupt". Party from Rape by M•norlhes "Because of the secret nature of Pr~!essor of Enghsh lit Southern Meth· Leaving even the Lefties in tha, Northern Democrats have been the discuss~ons, no news or_ p~blicity odtst University, Dallas, has ~one a long audience gasping, t.he professor sat vited to join with SoutHerners in representabves have been mVIted to way to make atonement !or hts colleagues down. !~ft~!~.f ~~~ pt~tis!fs~~~·r:~~~i~ati~g th~;::~i:g~• ::ee ;~:c~~o~:::n~;:·up- !~:o~.~~~; ~i:e~~~~~~% :h~e~~a~~ ~~~~;~~ • • . the Party of Jefferson to its original take 'but we can't understand why o.f Am~r~c~ns .for mstructors m our educa- In PohtJcs There Js pr~~~pl~~~iUtion was extended by ~~~~se:~dtiv:fs ~~/h~ig~~~~~ o;J:.~~t; too~~: ~::~':;·:::~omented facts titled "Tbe Only Right and Wrong ~:~~ o~~hso~~ioe~~w~~~~~~~~/g~~ ~:;~·1 ~r:~s~~:er~i~c;:;\thse~!roknsc~~ ::;; ~"::~~.~~'.',.~;~~~·;i;:; 1:;.~~,i:~; de~;::~:d ~:::,.~~~~·ht ·~. ~~=~~o,~:: S~u~~~~s~i~·h~f :~~tc~~~d ,~nf~e-~hc~ re~~~d~li~hv~ ~~~r~~~~:~~~~g~~~l~cJy whtch no Amencan can afford to pass up. as bei~g·i~ the mid~J~ o:!he road political~ the national ~ominee ¥f a~ti-South1ern the salaries and expenses of all par- T~e ~earles~?e.ss and coura_ge he has ly whtch, m our oplmon, 1s ~he worst f~rm lanka are written into the next lat- ties involved are entitled to full in- s~own m pro~ Jdmg the Amencan people of sla~der that could .be dtrected agamst form. p formation about such proceedings. :::~.Y~~· .:ra:••c:~~;[.u~~n;~• a:';~~~[;''~~ ' ';;n~~~~~· ::• :::,:i~~coihat the United "If Northern Demo~rats sell t~e sub\'ersive forces throughout the world wHI States does not need at this, or anY other, Jlar~y name and orgamzation t~ mm· have felt preUy certain that Russia probably earn him the "smear" which is period ih history it is a president who on he~ to be debauched by t~e1r un- not make war on us since she is doing the reward of patriots in this peculiar per- evades a clear-cut position on an issue bY Amencan an~ un-D.emocrahc pur- so well without a war, but now we are not iod of history who dare defend Americanism straddling it. ·'' poses, the dehvery Wtl~ not be f!la~e so sure. Since Stalin has issued his public and the American way of life. For twenty years now we have had ao far as the Democratic party Withm statement disclaiming any intentions of left-wingers in the of!ice of Chief Eexecu~ ou.r State is concerned,'' Leachman startina World War JJJ, we look for it any tive and we know what h1111 happened to aa1d, and added: day now. A man who i.s aiming his whole the Country as a result. "We are determined to reclaim for career at a pension of some sort and .The ulvation of the Republic de- ~~e a~~u~~g~r{y 1f~~~! ~0a~i~~:l of hon- We've got to hand it to Truman for one :~e e~~~l~ af~ r~~: i~r t~~ ~~~;e m!~r~~ ~;:~e~~ ::e N:l:~:r c!h:n 8~~~~i~~~ :~; uatic Party. This position was thin~. He never o~erlooks an angle. When Ieadershjp, Nobody in an emergency opposite of the political beliefs which have v.:hen the party abandoned the he fued McGrath, m order not to offend the follows a man whose dream is a rock- led us into National Socialism. thirds rule for nomination of presi- Catholics, btl named another Catholic to lng chair .. , Lynn Landrum, Dallas A middle-of-the · roa_d eourst will not dential candidates In 1936". the job. MorninJI News get ~he Job done. _A.p:_r_li,_ 1_95_2_ _ __________T HE SOUTHER!: C_O_N_s.E R_V_ATI_VE_ _____________P_ _:ag;o_S We Can Remember When A Minister's Only Mission Was To Preach Tile Word Of 6od Vo!e On Tidelands Veto Will Prove Whether Congress Has Majority Of Mice or Men THi SOUTHERN COHSIRVATIVI April, 1952 , ... 6 Wbole Machinery Of Federal Government Unable To Investigation of Large Foundations Do What Coolidge Accomplished Alone And Unaided Will Open the Eyes of Americans The inability of the Truman admin-~·· . r~:~!~ toru~'~P~l':e s;:i ~~~;e~~~: Colorful Southerner Says in~~:o~~ce.m•;;o;~;.~s i~;:ti;:i~~ Mrs. James N. Andrews Ep. osed walkouts is a national dis- Thai He Doesn't Like Ike which, if it comes off and is thorough· Of Virginia Passes ce and pomts up the current co~· ly and fairly prosecuted, should open ICe ~nd low mora.ls prevalent m Judge George w. Armstrong of Texas the eyes of Americans to some of In the death o£ ~1rs. James ~· AndreWI our nabonal leadership as comgat~d and Mississippi, loved by his friends and the most surprising and effective of Somerset, Virgmia, and. Aiken, South ~~~~teofw:~o~hb~~ %3 wu~endm:nvl~ respected by his enemies f~r a brand of mediums of subversive propaganda ca:olina, last month, the nat~on lost a go?<' •hreat!ned strike in less .fuan one day. ~o::eat!~ ~~dthfee~~ce:s:t~~r:.l~I:~dh~; ~::~~ now operating in this country, citizen and we a staunch fnend. Labor Union domination of govern- ington bureaucrats, has expressed his opin- The investigation was proposed by Mrs. Andrews, who was the form_er ~ent is inc~eas~g instead ?f dimir_llsh- ion on the leading candidates f_or no?tina· Representative Cox of Georgia in a Julia du Pont, member of the great tn· tog a~d ~IS . evil f()rce w1ll continue tion as president on the Repubhcan ticket. resolution which was adopted by the dustrial family of Delaware, repre~ented all ~~~:ia~~ :~~:t~:n~:-~~~~kfi~go~~ ~irst ~!£,.the J~~ge says unequivocally: House by a vote of 193 to 158 and that was best and noblest in Amer1can wom-t~. w:~pr.~ur'~ ";;h:'rm:.~~ti~~·~ /d::~,\~kk: ~~;.for these re.asons: ~~n~.~~:.~~II :::c~tY::'!a\et~;:g~~~a~ an::;:~red, inlormed and patriotic, •h• "at. . w;~ldb~~~\:av~ha~ish;re~:n~ j~':'~!:;~~s 1~: tions and Foundatio,~s _to dete:min~ devoted much _of her time, tal~nt and ener· Taking over the iru:lustry or C?n· socialist Truman thought r:rn so, nor would the whether they are . usmg thell' re Ig y to awakemng other Amencans to the against which a proposed str!ke socialist Roosevelt have promoted him as sources for un-Amencan and subver- dangers which threaten the Republio ti(>l~~~~~~s ~~ "r~~o~f~r ~-~~~~!s~~~~ :~;e E;~:P:~~it;:;t:a~~~r j0~ve~n~~~e~~:; ~~vee ;~!~:i:~e~r ~:·a~~~io~u:~ot~: ~:~t;~ ::i::~~:st.he inroads of Socialism in our .in-do not have etther the personal. nor regulations unless he thought so. He is now States" ~~i!~~; ~~~rf;~h!0 p~~e; i~~:re1:t~ue ::!~a~is~o~~t:! !~rar!:: ~~~si:~:ec; s~~ia!~~ Sine~ 158 House members voted w~::n w:: :e::;se~:t~;~ca ofm~~~ i:: ;;! Also, it is a step toward nationali- press writers and the anti-~h~istian kept against the resolution, it is obvious off-set the efforts of the bold, brash and -.tion of our business and industry press. The o!!er of the soc1ahsts Stasse_n that the investigations of these Foun- highly vocal females who have cast their 1Vhich i& the ultimate goal of stan·y- and Warren to give him some of their dations have three strikes against lot with alien forces to sell us out ·to eyed Socialists currently in positions dele~ates in Wisconsin and Nebraska, whe1·e them to start with and that the power Socialism, and to regain respect for $he ~ ~w:r w~~=~i~::n;:~t~ite~·~~: ~:a~~h:;t a~tw~~~· :: ~:c~~~~:~ t~ems::: ~nd influence ge~erated by the ~il- ~=~t~h~:i!;:g b:t:: 1!:-!~~~~ i:Y t~~o;:r~: 1ystem and want the government to thing. It is socialism and "brotherly love". bons of dollars of these endowed m- of the United Nations and other subversive own or operate private business any ,.1 do not believe that he is competent stitutions reaches. out .into ~ll seg- agencies. way. to_be president. He has been a conspicuous ~ents of our society, mcludmg the The State of the Union would not be IC the government Is going to 11take fallure in olher important jobs. He re- ongresa. at its current low ebb if all American t_";~; ~=n:~;~~p~~ 1~:: ~:::J~: ::~a;:e!r~e:n~~a~?r~!~~~hf;·o::.s:~::;i~~- ~~~ is ~~i~i~~~nt~o~m~~~n~h~~:;~~~~ =~:ren .::d :;~~:~~:! t:; ~:~f;e;~· ~::; restraint of trade to the racketeers it, which cost us the expensive all' lift to need to hear and think about. Andrews. 1fho are_ responsi~le f()r the strikes? ~:ed h!:' f~~;!in inpe:r;e.pr:s:n~e~:~ i!ha! Alger Hiss, for instance, was head 1---------- ea:: oT:: S~~~~e~:::~ ::o ~~llso~: ~2~~~ ;:;t.:~~:=· about 11,500 of which ~~i~~: ~~ t~e~erjv~r~n chhear~:s ~:~:u;~ Ratification of Japanes~ T reaty f!tr~~~0t~:~~~J;; ~~a~~e '~~it~:~~ "Eis~nhower ha: no political principles, ~~~ !~~~~ed ~~dli:Oi~~~~~ ,:'0~ ~~e[rl~~ C:~lee~.:~.t:,:~a!fot~e~:;.~:.K~::: boss of Re[ugio County in South or U he has, he la afratd to express th~m. tor that crime. was a aell-out similar to the Yalta sell-out 't'ex.as. ,~-. aouKht to &et aome express1on .of. Europe the 0 hdoa of. Sen•lor Jack 1 of ~~~~~ff~?:s ~~~~~~6o:~~~i~;~;~ a:d sent ·h~~dd=p~ty: ~hoB~~:· ;;;";";~~:~: If HE GETS BY WIJH ~:~r:~n~fm Caa~~o~~~~:;:!!:ni~ ~il~il~tC::u~~ . b d . d . th for hun. An Ulqut sttJve reporter soug try. left sornetl~I~lg to ~ esire 10 e to Jearn his church affiliation. All of the JHIS WE GIVE UP r~ q~aili~!~~~~l f=~~~~~~~~s P~~~e~::. !;~~~r~~t:~na ~.~ .. ~~::~i~::. .. was a statement r Te~~~y b~~::ga;5,is b~co::s:h::n~~!· ~::0a~o; eonal courage so conspicuously lack· When Truman looked the situation lished with the consent and advice oi the lng in our public officials now from "What a contras_t with the honest, P1 ~.in- over and realized he could not be United States Senate ~:~¥.ce of the Peace on up to Presi· :~:;~e!::~·r T~~·~epl~tf~0r:.0: k:g:;ew~~~ :l~!~~~~~en;~\~eh~~;~~tec~~08~h~~: The Treaty provide-d for the termination When the employes. of a ~ge oil ::e~~~~=:· T~~-~:~~:Yc~:~i;~~o:C~n~:;r~ ~i~ation~ that he thinks will succeed :: t~ee a~~=~ne~:~~:h:;e;he; ~n~~=d o~i~it~ eo~pany near RefugiO decided -~ government, and. against socialism. Where · and Japan there shall have come into force ~a~~ :~uc;;:~~%r~:;~e~o ~~k~h~ir :~~:r~:~e~:!u!~senhower stand on these za:;n t~~ ~~v:~~~:~t o:h~e p~~~~:~; ~~;~~~it;~o~~~:n:::n~~~ ~a·i::e~!~c:at~; place. "Eisenhower is a pussyfooting politician all patronage be dispensed wit_h. in the. United Nations or ot~erwise of inter- The Sheriff rounded up the neces- who seeks to be president without the future and many ~oyernm~nt ofhc1als nahonal peace and secu.nty in the Japan aary number of laborers and promis- voters knowing his views; Ta[t is a courag- be named under C1v1l SerVlce. area" Senator Tenney pomts out. ed to have th~m on the job next ~~Y· eous statesman who dares to express them. He already has the government This he charges means that the provi­:: the m~antt~n~, \~d ~aoT~mtoort~nJ "Also what a contrast to MacArthur, who, loaded ~ith ch~p croo~s and chisel· sion~ ~f the Trea't~ are void when the Y grapevme ta a he nc whl were in his Jackson, Mississippi, speech, de· ers of hiS sele_chon ~n~ figures he can President of the Umted States is re-ady to ~~~~ ~~r~ u~~t~n, \~::~corning to nounced the extra~a~ance_ and corruption ~~~ez~nl~e~a m t~h:~~ J~b~ivffrsear~~~~ =~~~de that the United Nations should'take Rc[ugiQ to beat up workers who took of the Tr~man adnumstrat~on an? the steal employe out )s to blast him out with ' the strikers' places. of our TJdelan~s. MacAtthur ts _a great dynamite. In one case, it cost the gov- But above and beyond that, in his ()pin- This was during the Thirties when ~talesman, as v.ell as ~ ~~·eat sold .. er. He ernment $500,000 to get rid of one ion, there was a graver. reason why it Union Labor was first beginning to IS outspok~_n f~r Conshtuhon~.l go\crnment Civil Service employe because of long should not have been ratified ancl that wu feel its oats as a result of New Deal and _for \Hnmng the wa~ with the Com- litigation. that the preamble to the Treaty imposes :~dd~:~~ at~d b\~~/~~~rs~~~~~u~~d~~~~ ~:n~~~pt~:r ~~~:'fnt=r~~~~n~~n:f.~ru~~-~ _U Congress does not pu~ a stop ~o ~:Xo~;c~~::u~~e ~~o~~~~V:sa~!h~~· ~:v:: errclear of[ the job. ~:d s~~~t~:~~~ f~: :~~~:~/~td that there 1S 1~l:a:~~l~~e~~:~se a~~~~~~ ~~a~~ :~0~i:~dfe:t~u;:~n~!ui~~:s Gper:~~:~s.Canven- . ~re~ 1~~ ~~o~:rsm~~~;~~\ou~a:! "VVhat a contrast between MacArthur's they sometimes act. Soviet opposition at the San Francisco ~~ str~kcers' places, Sheriff Heard was adm~n~strat~on of Japan and Eisenhower's . Conference was all subtle trickery by U.S. right on hand accompanied by only admmlstrahon of Ger"_l~ny. The one was ynsolved Mystenes: Where. are Harry S.R.. r~presentatives who wanted the Treaty 0~~~eputy and two sawed-off shot- ;:;;:~la~i~~ ~~:s~~:t;'~:~d at=~-~~~:s~r:: ~~~!~ ;t:~esJugd:ve;:~::t ~:~to~~o i:~.~ ratifi~, _se~ator Tenn~y said and added: i . i and destructive, and the Germans desptse some defenite action taken in each of· their ''Rahftcahon means 10 the words of Sena- Wlth _the calm_ and deadly serf Ol\i~ him. cases? Alao, where is Henry Grunewald, tor Jenner, final and ultimate betrayal of ness whtc~ law VlOlators f~m Re ~gto "Eisenhower Initiated the Morgenthau mystery man of the tax scandals who was the men who fought Japan and of the men iMl the. R10 ;rand!ct h~~ ~~rn~f _ to be summoned before investigating com- now locked in mortal combat with Com .. ~~~h~~ ~~e r;~p 'of ~trik~~s a~d well that the Sheriff was not kidding mittee but bas never shown up? :~:~! ::r~~~e:.~ the dark and b)oody ~elr Houston confederates and •a~d: drew aside their comrades and whis-1------ ----1 "You boys have decided that you pered in their ear. program of destroying the G'erman racel---------- d.on't want to work and that's okay. In a few minutes, the strikers had and Germany's -factories. While stationed The c_ommunist-inspired campaigri of You have that right. But I have some dispersed, the gorillas had headed in Berlin he employed negro troops "':'ho racial ag1tation which has dis&raced this men here who are going to take your back to Houston in their cars and the rounded up 4,000 German women and girls country for years has spread to datkest f~c~~r~~dbfa~~~t~va~\~~~ t~J~:o~!~!! tro\~~~:t '~~= :::~ is a few Ira Heards ~not p~n~::!d~n~i::~~!!~r ~se~~;n:e;~: ~;!~~e::e~: j~: ~:t~·e~o::em::~li~:ai~~ ._ move to harm one of them is going in high official positions in this na- the G~rmans to furnish men and munitions "unjust racial law.s". Over there, as here. to eat supper In hell". tion, including that of the Chief for h1s army, "":bich he badly needs, and rich and.poor wh1te trash are cooperating The local boys who knew only too Executive. which they hesttate to do." and helpmg to spread the unrest. ;_A::._P•....:R,_J_95_1__• ___________T .:.:H.:.:E~S=O:.:U_::TH~E:::.::RN CONSERVATIVE Page 7 Watchful Eyes Peer Through Cracks at Two Receptions . The press re<ently carried a story of a··-ing--=....tre-atm-e-nt- fo-r -,y-ph-illi-s -,.-d -oth-er-v.-. 11 b1g blow-out g1ven m honor of Mrs. Roose- nereal diseases. velt by a hi~h mogul in India. White House footmen in livery sen•ed The descnption of the _lavish affair with them ice cream, cake and lemonade after t~e abundance of expensive food and rare which Mrs. Roosevelt, with a fine disre­vmtages was somewhat at variance with gard for the laws of health and sanitation tbe general .impression prevailing here took them on a tour of the new kitchen t~ that poverty and famine il widespread show them how White House food was throughout that nation. prepared. To Readers Of The Southern Conse11ative In the near future, the mailing list of the Southern Conservative will be revised by the mailing company which sends it out each month . We have sent out statements to those whose subscriptions are due but do not have the help required to continue sending out notices. All those who have not renewed their subscription within thirty days after receiving notice will have to 1M removed from the list. We will deeply appreciate the cooperation of our readers in this matter and ask them to send in check at once if they wish to continuo to receive the paper. We figure that if our readers like the paper, they will be glad to pay for it and if they don't like it, they won't miss it when we take them off the list. The high official who gave tne party for During the party twenty cops and matrons Mrs. Roosevelt was reported as having sixty from the reform school patrolled the wives only seventeen of whom were allowed grounds and peeked In on the party every II--------------------' to attend the sumptuous banquet, but even few minutes to make sure that none of the Mundt Says Southern Democrats and po~tical personalities" Senator Mun~t :::~v7t~::. not allowed to participate in the ;~:~~a~dy's guests of honor took Jt on Are Political Orphans in a Storm :~:;~P~t '~T~:~en:oad:i~:~:1:t :oac~::"·q~= They were seated behind a sort of lattice So we just wondered if Mrs. Roosevelt, ie~ator Karl Mundt of ~uth Dakota U: tion-'By what rule 1hall we live iii th• work arrangement and viewed the goings- during that gay party in far-off India with provmg one of the best fnends the South USA?'" on through the openings. envious wivea peering through the cracks bas had outside of its own border&. Senator Muodt .uggested that the a}.. Perhaps it was the description of these at the gue"sts at their husband's party, was A candidate for no office, the Senator ternative of the •eople of the South, in women looking through the crack$ which not reminded of that other lathering in has worked in season and out to try to the event they cannot accept either the reminded us of a party given by Mrs. Roose- the long ago when equally watchful eyes bring together the forces throughout the Democratic or Republican nominees after nlt herself during the Thirties when she gazed through knot holes ln the fence in nation who are interested in Constitutional the Chicago conventions is to hold a Dixi• was the occasional mistress of the White order to keep tab on the recipients of her government, to the end that a undidate wide convention, name their own candidate House. hospitality. will be elected president who will treat the and throw the election in the House of The affair was written up in Time Mag- South as an integral part of the United Representatives. azine of May 25, 1936, which reported that Thanks to the addle-pated "experts" in States, in contrast to the shabby treat- In this event, he feels that a president she had entertained sixty girls from a re- the Federal Department of Agriculture who ment it has received at the hands of the would be ~amed who would be acceptabl• form school near Washington at a recep- messed up the potato situation last year Fair Deal and New Deal. to all sechons of the USA and that Demo­tion she gave in their honor. by dumping and mutilating the best speci- He has taken time out of his busy life as crats. of the Sou~h would no ~onger have The "guests" were mostly Negroes and mens of this product, leaving only culls, a member of the United States Senate to occaswn to feel hke "orphans tn a storm.'' all of them had been three-time losers in high class potatoes are now being tm- make several trips to Southern States and bouti with the law. At the time Mrs. ported to this country from Spain. That's address large gatherings on the Issues of The Senate has voted $100,000 for Roosevelt entertained them, they were serv- the ticket, pals. Help everybody except the the day. an investigation into the scandals of ing out their sentences as well as receiv- people of our own country. As he sees tt, the South faces an op- the office of alien property which portunity such as no other section enjoys seized, administered and disposed of WHERE "MY NIGHT" MAY BE PURCHASED ~~:s.w~~.h·,~;o:w:;;;;.~~te~u~'·:.:'·:.~ !;;>eo~oo~~~~ 7r'::'~ ;,;e!:;P~~;:nt:I'~ "My Night" ts now on sale at the following book stores: pealed at Philadelphia, to influence the during World War ll. O~e of the J'JWlt· Iutton Place Book Shop, 407 E. 67th street, New York, N.Y., destiny o£ the nation. . ters to be g~ne into lS an alleged New England News Company, 30 Garrison Street, Boston "The issues to be decided by the Amen- three-way s.plit &f a $420, ~00 fee by Frederick and Nelson, Fifth and Pine, Seattle, Wash. can electorate next November exceed three law frrms, one of wh1ch is ~at Tbalhimer Brothers, Inc., Richmond, va. partisanship, geographical considerations, of John Foster Dulles, Republi~n Office Supp1y Company, 817 East Capital, Jackson, Miss. historical cleavings, economic groupings Fair Dealer. Harvard Cooperative Society, Harvard Square, Cambridge, Mass. Charle1 Cobbler Book Store, 111 Richmond at Main, Hout~ton, To•• Silva's Book Store, 115 Whitaker Street, Savannah, Georiia. Killer and Rhoads, Richmond, Virginia. :Uiller'a, Inc., Knoxville, Tennessee. University Cooperative Society, 2246 ·Guadalupe St., Austin, Texa1. Smith and Hardwick, 406 North 20th St., Birmingham, Alabama. Otto Ulrich Co., Inc., 396 Main, Buffalo, New York The columns hMy Night .. being currently used have appeared in \be book of that name but not the Southern Conservative. We will continue to run those columns until all those in the book have been printed in the paper. MY NIGHT Elizabeth Agee's Bookshelf, 1915 11th Avenue, Birmingham, Alabama, By tho Editor Matheny's, Inc., Knoxville, Tennessee. Th Book Stan. 2025 Guadalupe, Austin, Tezaa· we drove down from Jeky1l Park a little earlier than usual last night in order The Fair, 7th at Throckmorton, Fort Worth, Texaa that 1 might attend a dinner given in honor of visiting members of the Yukon ReiD-The Old Corner Book Store. 50 Bromfield Street, Boston, Mau. deer Milkers Union, before rushing to a night session of Amalgamated Countriet. National Council for American Education, 1 Maiden Lane, New York, N.Y. The short time 1 was able to spend at the dinner proved a very rewarding ex· Emmons Book and Record Shop, 815 North Charles Street, Baltimore, Md. perience as it gave me an opportunity to briefly renew ac- J. B. Book and Gift Shop, 626 Marshall Street, Shreveport, La. 4 quaintances I had made some years befo1·e white on a lecture Women's Voice, 537 South Dearborn, Chicago, ill. tour of the North Pole and other outposts in the Artie Circle. California Anti-communist League, 257 South Parkview St., Los Angeles, Calif. ' Following a hurried word of greeting and a lew reminlicences, :::b::th':~ ~~~s~~g ~o::,oc::~rt=d ~~~cew::;ts~':::hmond, Va. ~a~~d t~0 !~:veA=:lg~i~~;:d inc::t:=d~W~~i~e :uia:~ur;:u:~: J. R. Monaghan and Company, 413 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C., Canada. where I had to function in two capacities. ~:~!~~i~:e:~~:1 4~~~:;t c~:r:!:~:· s~~:i, Pasadena, California. and 1c:~r!:~~:;e·:t·;:~o~m~~:eG~:~~~~ !~:~b~it~~nth:~ai0:! ~i~h~~~eB!okus:, i~~i~~e';;r~:~ :~2 ~;:n;;~~a.Street, Lu Cruces, New Mnlco. ganization to bring about widespread mingling of the white and Popular Dry Goods Co., El Paso, Texas. colored races as a step toward the mongrellzation of the Allglo- Gittman's Book Store, 1227 Main Street, Columbia, South Carolina. Saxo~ ~~~ull:t~:: c:~a~~~y ~o~;~ !: ~ha~:~~;et~tr:fd:~~~nD:fm~c;al~y who was to be ~~~~h?t:Ot~:~s;e~1~1 E:::o~~e!:tonio Street, El Paso, Texas the principal speaker of the e\'ening and who has only recently given great emphasil The American News Company, 131 Varick St., New York, N. Y. and dignity to the cause of racial tolerance and understanding by marrying her Doubleday Book Shop, Penobscot Building, Detroit, Michigan. color~te~a~::::dun:i~~ this distinguished guest, I dashed back over to the general t~;t:~!~ =~~: ~~gg; f:S w~~~r!~~"N:~ p:~~k ~.~.b, Florida. meeting of Amalgamated Countries and reached there just in time to cast my vote Robm's Bookshop, 413 South River, Geneva, Dlinois. in favor of a resolution demanding the compulsory registration of Republicans, Con-- :f'~1~11~.~s~C:::,~~:re~ai~~?'·1~cNo~~~~hn~~~~~ ~~~r:;:bUs~Os~i~gton, D.C. servative Democrats, States Righters, Dixiecrats and other domestic enemies, with Millers Book Stol'e, 64 Broad Street, Atlanta, Georgia. the Department of Justice. ~/T~:l:f~sf:!~ee;~ ::6~ ~1~P.s~~e~~~:, ~~~Ph~~YTennessee. of ~~: ~:c:r~::ti:~ h~~it~::n t~~o::;:lu~!~ i:Y c:~~:::~::o:it~em::.~a;; Acme Code Company, S97 West 33rd Street, New York. the Hill Tribes of Southern Ethiopia, assisted by experts in phraseology from the William Ballantyne & Sons;- 1421 F. Street, Washington, D. C. policy-making division of the State Department. Brown Book Shop, 1013 Fannin, Houston Texas. Following adjournment, I made a hurried trip to a dinner beiag givta for those Lena Dean Book Shop, 117 West Front, Tyler, Texas. who will participate in my new television program which I wu fOfted to put on Ia. Doubleday Book Shop, 934 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach, Florida. order to be able to answer more questions. i~:s :~r~:;!~h~:r:o!~o=~o~~d9 A;!~~a~~~a~ '!::~:~hc::~r~~: ::~~£~· ~iorado. While I have always tried to urge every one with whom I t•me in ~onlact to ask ~~:e:;:~~a~o:~:h~~~p~~;~:luT~~:ts a;~~::.· :C,~;:~n~~~;a~:!::t~~~· :neo~~ee:!~on;a:n v:':; i~na~~~:t~bja~t:, hla::v;e!~lt u~a~l:~ ::~:dacofm:o:;m:.~;;:i:: Robin's Bookshop, 413 South River, Geneva, TIIinois, I felt were entitled to this service, Santa Fe Book & Stationery Company, 100 San Francisco Street, Santa Fe, New Mexico. In order to overcome this unintentional neglect of a large pertion ol tilt popula- P. K. Smith & Company, st. Petersburg, Florida. tion, I have now •et up, by mtana of television, a sort of Super Quiz ProiJam wber• Womrath Bookshop, 74 Trinity Place, New York, New York. I hope to be able to provide free education to the musts by flll'Jiilhin« them with all Concord Book Shop, 36 South Michigan Avenue, Chicago, IDinoi1 the answers. L S. Ayres & Company, Indianapolis, Indiana The dinner was given by Mr. Isadore )Jergsteinvitch, manater of my program, Palm Springs Book Shop, Palm Springs, California and I was very fortunate in that my arrivai at the table coineidtil with that of the DeWolfe & Fisk Company, 2 Park Street. Boston, Ma.ssachusetU entree, thereby enabling me to take up the meal when I had ldt off Hr11er in the Smith & Butterfield Company, 305 Main St., Evansville, Indiana evening. F. M. Perry Book Store, 220 Hogan Street, Jacksonville, Florida (Copyright 1952 by Ida M. Darden) ""~~" 8 THE SOUTHERN CONSIRVATIVI Truman Maintains His Batting Average In His Appointment Of New Attorney General April, tnw
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