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The Southern Conservative, Vol. 4, No. 11-12, November-December 1953 - File 001. 1953-11/1953-12. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 16, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/southern/item/503/show/494.

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(1953-11/1953-12). The Southern Conservative, Vol. 4, No. 11-12, November-December 1953 - File 001. The Southern Conservative. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/southern/item/503/show/494

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The Southern Conservative, Vol. 4, No. 11-12, November-December 1953 - File 001, 1953-11/1953-12, The Southern Conservative, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 16, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/southern/item/503/show/494.

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Title The Southern Conservative, Vol. 4, No. 11-12, November-December 1953
Contributor
  • Darden, Ida M.
Publisher Southern Conservative
Date November 1953-December 1953
Language English
Subject
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
Place
  • Fort Worth, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 10604411
Collection
  • Houston Metropolitan Research Center
  • Ida M. Darden Collection
  • The Southern Conservative
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Houston Metropolitan Research Center.
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript THE SOUTHERl Sec. 34.66 P.l.&R. U. S. POSTAGE PAID Permit No. 1665 Fort Worth, Texas . 1ERVATIVE -To Plead for a Return of t 11al Government- Vol .. 4 Fort Worth, Texas, Nc. ... ember-December, 1953 No. 11-12 •I SIS •n t e ited ates a Fast-C s Rosenberg Mantle On Shoulders Of Of Treason Dropped Fellow-Conspirators If the spine-chilling disclosure that Communist spies are operat­ing within the very core of our national defense doesn't blast the American people out of their com­placency, nothing will. We now have convincing evi­dence that the evil of the Rosen­bergs lives after them and that their vile legacy to the country hey etrayed is a carefully-plan­ned espionage ring leading through underground channels from Wash· ington to Moscow. We have learned, too, that the black mantle of treason was drop­ped on the shoulders of their fel­low · conspirators who succeeded them in sensitive agencies of gov-ernment, pledged to carry out their mission and provide Russia with information to enable her to construct the deadly weapons necessary to our destruction. This is not the first time in the nation's rugged history when the people of the Republic have walk­ed with heavy hearts in the Val­ley of Gethsemane and faced grave threats tu their security imposed by alien foes. But it is the first time on record that widespread disloyalty among our own citizens has inspired in the hearts of American patriots the same measure of fear and dis­trust of many of their countrymen which they feel toward their ene­mies in a foreign land. Tough On Those And Who Are Too To Poor To Live Can.,t Die Tax- burdened Pennsylvanians who may have hoped to some day escape to the peace and security of the grave, have just come in for an awful shock. Tax authorities of the Quaker State, having apparently run out of live victims, are now taxing the dead. The sales tax, which is one of the numerous forms of legalized gyp by which august representa­tives of a Commonwealth may pick your pocket without fear of arrest, has just gone into effect there. Tucked away in this statute enacted by the bright boys in the Pennsylvania legislature is a cun­ning little provision which says that fifty per cent of the lump sum charged by the funeral direc­tor when a citizen is buried, is subject to the sales tax levy. If a vault is involved, the sky Afford is the limit and tribute can be exacted on the whole works. We are not familiar with all details of the law and are not sure whether or not, in the event the tax is not paid, the tax collector can confiscate the coffin and hold it as security until all claims are settled. The tax racket continues to grow and thrive and it is begin­ning to look like there is no way to beat the rap, living or dead. Heretofore, tax chiselers have given up and called off the dogs at the gates of the cemetery but now they are beginning to chase the corpse right down into the grave. The Nobel Peace Prize has been given to General George C. Marshall and we are glad to have that matter cleared up. We have been wonder­ing who was responsible for all the peace and unity existing throughout the world. At a meeting of the General Assembly in london in 1946, a rule was slipped by which de-horned this country of all authority in the matter of firing its own employes. This action was apparently taken while all American repre .. sentatives, except Alger Hiss, were either touring the town in a rubber-neck bus, taking a boat ride on the Thames or feeding the pigeons in Hyde Park. Seven years later, Americans are learning that in a sort of sneak preview of the General Assembly in London in 1946 where they tried out the show before taking it to New York for a permanent run, the Russians slipped in a new act in the form of a rule which consti­tuted a hoax without parallel, on a gullible people of a sovereign na­tion. The sucker, of course, was the United States. It was only when an attempt was made to fire subversives work- . ing for the United States in the United Nations in · ax representatives in that body seemed to realize that they had nothing to say about it and that final authority in the mat ter r ested with the United Nations itself. Meantime, an alert and intelligent woman in New York, Alice Widener, had ferreted out this information, documented it with of­ficial records of the United Nations, published it in a twenty-seven page pamphlet and released it. We would think that it was, primarily, the responsibility of the State Department to first inform itself and then the American people of the manner in which the United States has been tricked in this matter at the London meeting but they were evidently so busy at whatever it is that State Departments do, that they didn't seem to get around to it. Mrs. Widener had to pinch hit for that agency and give the American people the information to which they are entitled. It will be remembered that eleven employes presumably work­ing for the United States in the United Nations were re-instated or given cash compertsation recently, after having been suspended for refusing to tell an investigating committee of Congress whether or not they were Communists. These employes had been suspended by Secretary General Trygve Lie following their refusal to answer these questions pending further investigation by a Commission of Jurists composed of three lawyers chosen by Lie from among member States of the United Nations. The conclusion of this Commission was that no employe of the United States working in the United Nations had the right to refuse to answer questions of a Committee of Congress and recommended that these employes be fired. At first Secretary General Lie announced that he would abide by their decision but, later, reversed himself like a switch engine after members of the staff of the legal department of the United Nations whispered in his pink ear. It is presumed that they told him that a member nation was powerless to fire its . employes in the United Nations because of the neat little trick pulled at the London meeting in 1946 when the mat­ter of employment, qualifications and firing of United Nations per­sonnel was being thrashed out. At that meeting, according to United Nations Document PC- (Continued on Page 2) Millions of Americans Think It--The Southern Conservative Says It Paoe 2 THE SOUTH ERN CONSERVATIVE November-December, 1953 Move To Cut Strong T entades Of Giant Business Octopus In Federal Government Americanism With A· Southern Accent By profession, Thurman Sensing is a publicist for the Southern States Industrial Council at Nash­ville, Tennessee. By preference, he is an Amer­ican patriot who takes time out from his professional duties to ad­dress civic clubs and other groups throughout the country on the State of the Union and those who are scheduled to hear him in fu .. ture, have a treat in store. We have enjoyed a sort of "cor­respondence friendship'' with him for years in which we have traded insults to politicians who have led this country down to the brink of ruin, but we had never met. Recently, we had the privilege of hearing him talk to a Fort Worth civic group and we find that he is a speaker after our own heart and if we were capable of making a public address, we would wish for no greater accomplish­ment than to be able to put them in the aisles, as Mr. Sensing re­peatedly does. He is that rare specimen of indi· vidual who can make people think by making them laugh and we are sure that the points he drove home through ridicule will linger longer in the minds and memory of his listeners than the most forceful illustrations based on logic, could have possibly done. Such, for instance, as his brief reference to the contemptible cus­tom currently prevalent in which politicians agitate the subjects of "segregation'' and "discrimina­tion11 for the advancement of their own interests. He reminded his audience that every time he got on a Pullman he saw one little room in one end of the car marked 11 Women~' and another at the other end marked "men." "That is 'segregation'/' he point­ed out and added: "But you couldn't by any stretch of the imagination call it 'discrimina­tion'.'' Any group of Americans desir­ing to be thoroughly instructed, and at the same time, highly en­tertained, could do no better than to get this great American with a Southern accent to do the job. "A Rose By Any Other Name" Mary Cain of Summit, Mississip­pi, tells how Mrs. Oveta CJ,!Ip Hob­by pondered long and earnestly over a proper title for her new department of the Federal Gov­ernment. She says the lady cabinet mem­ber had about decided to call it "Public Health, Education and Welfare" when all of a sudden it dawned on her that it would be called by its initials 'PHEW" and she hastily lopped off the word 11Public''. Possibly because the experience is currently rare, we react to good old - fashioned discussions on Americanism a n d sacred American tradition in the public forum, much as others do to a compelling drama on the stage. Recently, all in one day, our emotions ran the whole gamut from laughter to tears as we lis~ tened to two great Americans from widely separated sections of the country relate the bewildering story of the nation's gradual de­scent from its honorable station as a Constitutional Republic to the degenerate rank of a Socialist State. At a noon luncheon we heard a Tennessean paint the picture of our national decay in terms of ridi­cule which inspired side-splitting laughter on the part of his listen­ers at the stupidity and ineptness of lilliputian leaders, as related elsewhere in this edition. That night in one of the city's large auditoriums we heard a Cali­fornian talk on the same theme but his words inspired no laughter and there was only heartbreak in his telling of the tragic story of a nation's betrayal at the hands of those pledged to js:eep it inviolate from profane hands. That speaker was Willis E. Stone of Los Angeles and we imagine that his zealous concern for his country's survival, his obvious devotion to American pr inciples and his extraordinary capacity for impelling the citizen to action, must have been drawn from the same divine source which inspired Patrick Henry to rally his coun­trymen to the defense of American institutions in the early days of the Republic. As- president of the American Progress Foundation, Mr. Stone is devoting his efforts toward the submission of a proposed Consti­tutional amendment which would cut the strong tentacles of the giant business octopus which has fastened itself on the Federal gov­ernment and return the operation of business and industry to private interests. Mr. Stone will find it hard go· ing because grasshopper brains in this country who are committed to government operation of busi­ness and the nationalization of in­dustry will fight the movement at every turn. Although the record is clear that every time Washington poli· ticians have engaged in the opera­tion of business the only thing they were able to do was to sink it in a big pool of red ink, they won't surrender the idea that they are capable business executives until they are knocked loose from it by a Constitutional Amendment. Their ability along this line has been forcefully demonstrated ln their operation of the Postal Ser­vice which is going deeper in the hole by the hour. Although the Constitution dele­gated this job to the Federal gov­ernment and it must remain there, private enterprise could have done a far better job and kept it on a paying basis. We can only explain this one COMMUNISTS- (Continued from Page 1) AB-14, the position was taken that while it was common sense that the United Nations staff should be acceptable to the member govern­ments, and that the Secretary General should require information about applicants, it "would be extremely undesirable to write into the text anything that would give national governments particular rights in this respect". And so it was that four of the eleven suspended employes were re-instated in their jobs and seven others who preferred cash to re­employment, were awarded sums ranging from $6,000 to $40,000, amounting to a total of $135,000. Incidentally the man receiving a $40.000 award was in charge of a branch of American Intelligence during World War II, yet refused to tell a Senate Committee recently whether or not he was a Communist. In this connection, perhaps the following rule adopted unani• mously at the London meeting explains why these employes were acceptable to the United Nations and could not be fired: ''No persons who have discredited themselves by their activities in connection with Fascism or Nazism should be appointed by the staff of the United Nations Organization". Period. A point that stands out in this resolution like a Presbvterian Movie Producer in Hollywood, is the omission of 11Communism'' from the list for disqualification of even those working for a member nation which might be opposed to having Communists on its payroll. Obviously, no American representative at the meeting noticed, or saw fit to protest, this clever little trap in which the United States is now caught when it seeks to fire its own employes in the great world body, for refusing to confess their Communist affiliation. Since Communism was left off the list and since Nazism is as dead as the dodo bird, that leaves only those who "have discredited themselves by their activities in connection with Fascism" who are barred from employment at the United Nations. According to the dictionary Fascism is "a patriotic society ani~ mated by a strong national spirit ... directed against Socialists and Communists and the disturbances excited by them'' (New Century Dictionary). All Americans, except subversives, are "animated by a strong national spirit'' which , according to a strict interpretation of the rule, leaves only Communists and Socialists eligible for employment in the United Nations. . All of which clears up the mystery of why the Secretary Gen­er al of the United Nations made a quick switch and decided to re-instate all the accused employes who wanted to stay on and to pay off those who didn't. For years we have tossed brickbats at the United Nations and expect to continue to do so and on occasion we have employed ridicule and satire to point up its objectives but we now urge with all the sincerity and earnestness of which we are capable that every American who is concerned in the maintenance of this country's independence and its preservation as a Constitutional Republic, plead with their two senators to vote us out of it before it is too late. If they didn't know it before, surely it is now plain to all re­sponsible Americans, including members of the United States Senate, that the current type of diplomat and spokesmen delegated to represent us in world councils can no longer continue to play ball with interna• tiona] cut.throats without losing the shirts off the American taxpayers' back. , Those who have appeared in our behalf in the United Nations were possessed of hearts which were too soft-to say nothing of their heads- to cope with the Kremlin bandits who dominate it. In the international game of intrigue, conspiracy and treason­let's face it-we are sand-lot amateurs and we strike out every time we go to bat. In the final analysis, there is no more forceful, eloquent and accurate expression of mounting American sentiment than that embbd· ied in the simple slogan: "Take the United States out of the United Na· tions and the United Nations out of the United States". instance of defective planning by the giant minds who founded the Republic, on the ground that­from the vantage point of their own vast understanding - they couldn't visualize the pigmy in­tellects who would succeed them in the centuries ahead. All competitive business and in­dustry should and must be taken out of the hands of the government if we are to eventually avoid to­tal Socialism. This could be accomplished very simply if two-thirds of the mem­bers of Congress would submit the amendment for ratification by three-fourths of the State Legis­latures. But politicians don't act simply and according to the rules of common sense and the national good. They have to be hit in the head with the pickaxe of public opinion before they get the point. So the American Progress Foun­dation is taking the alternate pro­vision for amending the Consti• tution by securing passage of a resolution by thirty-two legisla· tures which will compel Congress to submit the amendment for rati• fication by thirty-six States. What the citizen can do to help is to urge his State lawmakers to pass the resolution demanding the submission of this amendment at the next session of his State Legis­lature. November-December, 1953 THE SOUTHERN CONS ERVATIVE Page 3 Reports Explain Why Government Agencies People Who Screamed For The Reduction of Have Been Crawling With Communist Spies Surplus Employes Howl When It's Attempted Americans who may be horror­stricken at the prevalence of Com­munist spies in various agencies and who wonder how these vermin have operated so long without detection, Should read some of the old reports­almost any report--of investigating Committees during the past fifteen years. For instance, in the Second Report of the Un-American Activities Com­mittee of the State of Washington, 1948, pages 145-157, appears the sworn testimony of Howard Rush­more, admitted Communist Party member for five years and who did a stretch as reporter for the Daily Worker. Rushmore told the committee of various Communist spies who oper­ated in the early Forties and how atom bomb information was passed from hand to hand and finally on- to Russian agen.ts. He told of a college professor work­ing on the Manhattan Project who was observed by FBI agents as he handed a package to a man in a Chi­cago park. FBI agents trailed both parties. The professor w~s identified as a Professor Clarence H1skey, prom­inent atomic scientist and the man to whom he gave the package was known as Arthur Adams who had come to this country from Moscow in 1939 to set up a spy ring. The FBI also found, according to Rushmore's testimony, that the spy ring included other professors and Army and Navy personnel and that its headquarters was in a Madison Avenue jewelry store in New York owned by a woman named Victoria Stone. Hiskey's wile was operating a " mail drop" in which a Los Alamos scientist would mail certain material to another member of the ring in a large city who would. in turn, mail it to the Hiskey woman in New York. The Hiskey female would mail it to Victor ia Stone who relayed it to Arthur Adams. Th~ FBI had Adams' room wired, installed a microphone in the next room and collected evidence on him for a year and a hal!. Rushmore told how J . Edgar Hoover went to the White House with this evidence and begged permission to arrest the whole nest of spies but was turned down on the ground that they didn't want to offend Stalin. As late as 1945 his request to make the arrest was still turned down. Some of the FBI agents working on the assignment were so disgusted at not being allowed to close in on the ring after assembling the evidence, that they quit their jobs. This is only a small part of the testimony of one individual and there are hundreds of thousands of pages relating the sordid story of betrayal as told by former Communists to in­vestigating committees, State and National. A perusal of these reports is an education in itself on treason as prac­ticed on a wholesale scale during two national administrations. It is the humiliating and degrading story of two presidents who were willing to let their country be be­trayed rather than ofiend "good old Joe." And we didn't have any Joe Mc­Carthy then to defy them and put the security of his country fir st: if there had been one, it would be a dif!crent story now. Mercy Asked For Those Who We Will Go The New Do Not Know Its Meaning York Banker One Better A New York radio commentator announced in a recent broadcast that Eleanor Roosevelt had ex­pressed opposition to capital pun­ishment for the kidnapers and murderers of the little Greenlease boy. Much as it pains us to disagree with this eminent authority 0;n human behavior, we do not t hink it is possible to devise any form of punishment which would be ade­quate to deal with these beasts in human guise. Of course this attitude on our part probably indicates our com­plete lack of social consciousness and sympathy for the under-priv­ileged members of society In bestowing our sympathy only on the parents and family of the little boy who was brutally mur­dered, we are admitting our ad­herence to an old-fashioned con­ception of morality which is all out of line with the advanced thinking of enlightened world cit­izens like Eleanor Roosevelt. We think the president is to be high­ly commended for his refusal to go out fn the various States and campaign for the re-election or defeat of Congres­sional candidates. The executive de­partment of ·the government is en­tirely separate from the legislative branch and it is the responsibility of the people to elect both without sug­gestions from either. A New York banker, Eugene W. Castle, points out that the govern­ment has on hand enough f ilms in its stockpiles to last the United States Information Agency's foreign propa­ganda service three years. He asserts that three-fourths of the personnel overhead in the film de­partment should be eliminated and says he could show the U.S. Infor· rnation Agency how it could slash the $75,000,000 annual budget for global propaganda to $20,000,000. We could show them how they could slash it to zero with no loss to American prestige abroad and great gain to American taxpayers at home. Our plan would be to immediately stop spending one thin dime trying to prevent foreign countries from embracing Communism and use what­ever funds are .available for fighting Communism here in the United States. The brother of Janet Rosen­berg, the Chicago woman who tried to start a Communist revo­lution in British Guiana, came to the defense of his sister by saying publicly that she was " no more a Communist than George Wash­ington was a Communist' '. We would remind the young man that George Washington was never a member of the Young Communist League. Gordon Dean, head of the Atomic Energy Commission, said in a speech in Los Angeles r ecently that the time has come to deal firmly with Russia. The time has been here for twenty years, brother, and we didn't have sense enough to know it. Old-Time Religion Has Cione Way Of Bustles, Hoop Skirts Almost since the time when civ­ilization first began to enjoy the blessing of organized religion, the Evangelist has been a recognized factor in Christian service, and men like Dwight Moody, T. De­Witt Talmadge, Billy Sunday, Sam Jones and other noted preachers of an earlier period devoted prac­tically their entire adult life to this phase of the ministry. Perhaps they were somewhat dramatic and emotional in their appeals for converts to the cause of Christ and overly vehement in th e ir denunciation of sin and the Devil, b u t their sincerity was be­yond suspicion, their belief in the Bible unquestioned and their loyalty to their country and its institutions, unchallenged. We still have Evangelists who go about the country supplement­ing the efforts of local ministers by conducting revival services for church congregations, but any re­semblance between some of them and the old-style variety is pure-ly imaginary. - Instead of pointing the way to the Promised Land through the P early Gates of H eaven , they are likely to of fer the U n ited Nations as the r oad to P aradise on Ear th . Instead of urging obedience to the Ten Commandments, they may claim that in the abolishment of S egregation and the obser vance of Civil Rights lies the way to Sal­vation and Light. As a substitute for a H eavenly Kingdom in the hereafter, they are as liable as not to hold out for Union Now and instead of com­mitting weak mortals to the ten­der mercies of a Celestial Bar of Judgement, they are more likely to advocate trial by a Court of I nternational Justice. Modern Type Evangelist Holds Meeting in Texas Dr. E. Stanley Jones, who was for many years connected with the Fed­eral Council of Churches before it changed its name to the National Council of Churches, held a series of meetings at the First Methodist Church of Fort Worth recently. Dr. Jones will be remembered jl:> having been listed as a member of the American League for Peace and De­mocracy and as a signer of the "World Tomorrow" Poll The American League for Peace and Democracy was the recipient of some unkind treatment at the hands of the Committee on Un-American Activities of ttie Congress of the United States, having been described by that committee in these rather uncomplimentary words: "The largest of the Communist Front movements in the United States is the American League for Peace and Democracy .... The League contends publicly that it is not a Communist Front movement, yet at the very be­ginning Communists dominated it. Earl Browder was its vice president. An examination of the Program of the League will show that the organ- For years the air has been rent with justified shrieks of protes t against so many Federal employes and the de­mand was almost universal for a re­duction in the number: of leeches fat­tening on taxpayers' money. Just as soon, however, as the new administration tried to whittle down the personnel of some of the agencies and thin out surplus job-holders so that they wouldn 't fall over each other's feet, an equally strong protest went up against it. This was especially true in the case of the soil conservation division when Secretary Benson tried to r e-organize it so as to eliminate some of its personnel. It seems that this particular <!6Vncy had multiplied and reproduced itself to such an extent as to make guinea pigs seem sterile and unproductive. At the proposed re-organization and reduction in force , the soil conserva­tion experts in 2500 regional offices throughout the country set up a howl that would rival that of a similar number of hungry hyenas in the African jungle. Evidently they could not face the possibility that they might have to quit "experting" and start plowing. The incident also pointed up the hypocrisy in some sources for the demand for Sta te's Rights. The re· organization plan proposes to grad­ually put the responsibility for soil conservation up to the States where it properly should be and leave the Federal Department of Agric ultu re in the rol e of an advisor, but the re­gional offices answered right back that the agricultural colleges in the States didn't want the rcspon~ib i1i ty. How weak, flabby ii.LW.,/,·1 !.IOJ/.1,~;<> citizens get? We Love It And Admit It Ii our readers have gotten the im­pression that we are exceedingly elat­ed over the complimentary references to us and to the Southern Conserva­tive reproduced elsewhere in these columns, we want to assure them that they are dead right. We are. And if they don't think that such commendation by good Americans is sweet music to the car of one whose favorite indoor sport is taking CJacks at Communist skunks and their Amer­ican defenders, they have another guess coming. We don't mind what subversives say or think of us so long as Ameri­can patriots are on our team. W~~~~o~~ ~~~~~~s ~~t t~~ea~u~~e~s~ Court was invited to address students of the University of Texas recently. In a press in terview while in Texas he said hunger is the strong ally of Communists and implied that poverty was the reason most persons became converts to the Communist cause. Ap­parently none of the r eporters asked him to reconcile this statement with the actions of Frederick Vanderbilt Field, the hundreds of Park A venue Pinks, the Spies in government and defense plants. They were not hungry. ization was nothing more nor less than a bold advocate of treason.'' The "World Tomorrow'' Poll voted in favor of Socialism, a drastic in­crease in inheritance and income taxes, and a "cooperative common ­wealth'' to r eplace Capitalism. rage 4 The Southern Conservative A MONTHLY PUBLICATION OF EDITORIAL OPINION WITH NATIONAL CIRCULATION IDA M. DARDEN, Editor Editorial Offices Flatiron Building Fori Worth, Texas Phone FA·2089 Price $5.00 Per Year (Everypaidsubscriberisentitledtoone freesubscriptiontobesenttoanyperson of his choosing.) Sent without cost to members of Congress, members of State Legislatures, Governors, and other public officials. A helpless sparrow can drift with-I the wind but it tak•s an eagle lo fly against the storm. THE TENTH AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES: The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States are reserved to the Statosrespedively, ortothepeople. A Reflection On The Memory Of The Great John Marshall The appointment of Earl War­r en of California as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of the Unit­ed States can only be explained on the assumption that his selec­tion was decided upon by White House aQvisers while the· presi~ dent's mind was on vacation. With Frank Holman, Clarence Manion and scores of other re­nowned and brilliant exponents of American jurisprudence avail­able, the choice of the Californian who is regarded by some as a Re­publican, by others as a Democrat and by most as a Socialist, can only mean that the low standard of judicial performance among members of our highest tribunal is not to be lifted. It insures that this once great and incorruptible body set up sole ly for the administration of justice in accordance with the provisions of the Constitution, and of Amer­ican tradition, will continue to by­pass Congress and enact social legislation for the benefit of the nation's minority groups. It is, in brief, a warning to the citizens of the United States that they must agree to the uncondi­tional surrender of all hope for the restoration of ability, impar­tiality and judicial integrity as requisites for appointment to the American Court of Last Resort. If the appointment of Martin Durkin to a Cabinet post was "in­credible'', the selection of Earl Warren as Chief Justice is little short of an American tragedy. ''Let's get out of the House that Hiss Built before it is too late," says Mrs. E. M. Foley of New York. From a Savannah, Georgia, business man: "Your editorials are often quot­ed in our local pro-American papers, this city being one of the few in the United States that has a pro-Amer­ican press"' THE SOUTHERN CONSERVATIVE In Government Substitute For There Is No Statesmanship One of the most heartening events in recent political history was the disinterment of the 1ion­roe Doctrine by administration leaders in Washington. With our finger in every pie in every nation of the world and our troops and money scattered over practically every section of the earth, recourse to this policy may appear inconsistent, if not down­right r idiculous, but if it indicates a trend back to sanity, we can afford to repress our cynical smiles. It was invoked in the case of the attempted Communist coup in British Guiana and the world was informed that efforts to establish any Communist government in the Western Hemisphere would be re­garded as an act of aggression. The observance of this immortal policy by the United States for more than a hundred ·years sus­tained and protected this nation against all threats of foreign peril and kept our ship of state anchored in safe waters until Woodrow Wil­son buried it by barging into Eng­land's war with Germany and Roosevelt sang its requiem with a repeat performance in 1941. If, by some chance, a time-test­ed policy of government formulat­ed in the days when statesmanship was in flower and the best brains of the country were conscripted to serve the national interest, is to be revived by the present admin­istration , a grateful and long-suf­fering citizenship will rise up and call them blessed. Do-Gooder' s Paradise Where Talking When He Should Theorists Have A Field Day Have Been Listening Words, some spoken and some writ­ten, were bandied about by the mil­lions at the recent Fourth National Conference of UNESCO at the Uni­versity of Minnesota, according to Don Raible, weekly columnist in THE WANDERER, published in St. Paul. Representatives of heterogeneous groups, classes, creeds and kinds were present to contribute their sugges­tions for improving the world's cul­tural standards, one gathers from Mr. Raihle's report. Perhaps it was the heady per­fume from the tropical flowers in the beautiful leis around his neck which inspired the usually dis­creet vice president to talk out of turn. The occasion was his first stop in the island paradise of the blue Pacific during his flight around the world. November-December, 1953 They Didn't Ask Him So He Didn't Tell Them Here's another neat li ttle item cal· culated to instill us with still strong­er faith in the great world organiza­tion "without whose protection and assistance, we could not survive." Alexander Svenchansky is a Rus~ sian-born naturalized American who was working for this country in the United Nations and who was discharg­ed when it was found that he was still a Communist. After he was fired, a United Nations tribunal awarded him damages of $20,000 and several months back pay on his $10,500 sal­ary. (Later it was charged he was in­volved in an espionage ring spying for Russia.) Counsel for the Jenner Committee, in trying to find out how the United Nations tribunal happened to give him this large award called him to testify and asked him this question· "Did you tell the United Nations tribunal which awarded you $20,000 that you were a Communist" to which this imported patriot replied: "They never asked me if I was a Communist." This reminded us of the old story about the snake charmer. A man and his wife who had been married twenty-five years were sit­ting in a carnival tent one night watching an Indian snake charmer do his stuff with a six-foot python. Sud· denly the performer became ill and was taken off the stage. The manager came out and asked if there was a snake charmer in the audience, where­upon the man's wife got up, went up to the stage, put the python through his paces and finished the act. Meantime her husband had fainted dead away but when she returned to her seat he revived and asked her: "Why in the name of all that's holy, didn't you tell me you were a snake charmer," to which she calmly re­plied : "Perhaps never before in any semi­" You didn't ask me." nar or discussion group has so much wordiness been concentrated in such a short period of time," says the Min­nesota columnist, who added that it proved to be a talkathon with plenty of opportunities for those with glib tongues to express their pet theories. He had no sooner stepped off the plane at Honolulu than he prac­tically promised the Asiatic popu~ lation of Hawaii that they would be taken in as the forty-ni~th State of the American union at the next · session of Congress. South American Morals Describing UNESCO as a Do-Good­er's Paradise where theorists have a field day, and where so many ramifi­cations of what makes the world tick are involved that they may easily hurt any opportunity they possess for good, Mr. Raihle sums up the situ­ation in this philosophical observa­tion: nwhat ha'Ppens when efforts of stu­dents are spread so thin is that they learn less and less about more and more until eventually they know practically nothing about everything." Mr. Raihle's observations on the "unbiased" Salomon report on UN­ESCO which absolved it of all charges leveled by its critics is price­less. The Salomon Report resulted when President Eisenhower named three UNESCO delegates to investigate UNESCO. Mr. Raihle likened the pro­cedure to members of ''Murder, Inc." being put on a grand jury to investi­gate "Murder, Inc." The Salomon Report, naturally, whitewashed UNESCO and· gave it a "clean bill o! health," but Mr. Raihle intimates that the Jenner Committee may finally do a job on it with dif­ferent results. "The United Nations flag in the presence of the flag of the United States is a gross insult to George W.ashington, the founders of our nation, and to every American patriot who consciously fought for American freedom and inde· pendence"-Senator Jack 'renney of California. He went further and assured ~~~~ o~~~~r !~~~::?~~~de bse~ai~~ Should Get A Big Lift he would cast the deciding ballot in their favor. Let us hope that there will be no tie vote, or better still, no vote at all and that American lawmak­ers will have the utter madness and suicidal potentialities of the proposal brought home to them so forcefu lly in the meantime, that it will not be called up for consid­eration. We are all for the vice president about n inety per cent of the time but from h is broad commitment at his first stop, we are afr aid he will run out of promises before he gets to all the places he's going. Senator Joseph R. McCarthy told a group in Chicago that he is now in the middle of his greatest hunt for Com­munist skunks and said that "he doesn't give a tinker's dam what his critics say about him." That's telling them. It has been reported in the press that Chairman Velde, of. the House Un·American Activities Committee, has been corresponding with some so-called religious groups including the National Council of Churches in connection with the work of his com­mittee in investigating Communist activities, and especially as it relates to the churches. It is to be hoped that this report is incorrect. A movie actress· with red hair, a sultry voice and an overblown bosom will soon be sent out to South American Countries as an Ambassador of Good Will from Hollywood in an effort to bolster the movie capital 's prestige and win friends for film performers, according to a press dispatch. In the same edition carrying the story was a write·up of a divorce contest in a Los Angeles superior court involving one of filmdom's brightest stars in which his wife threw the book at him. She charged that he would not only leave her at home at night, go to call on a female movie charmer and forget to leave, but also cl aimed that his favorite stunt at a party was to kndck her down, grab her by the foot and drag her across the living room floor. So she decided to just up and leave him and get a divorce be .. fore he got rough with her. Pondering on both articles, we had the thought that there might possibly be some public relations and missionary work the attrac­tive red-head could do right in her own home town in helping to pro­tect the fair name of Hollywood. This would not only prevent the necessity for a long trip Involving inconvenience and expense but would also save wear and tear on her curves. November-December, 1953 THE SOUTHERN CONSERVATIVE Page 5 Big Politicians Beat A Path To The Door Of A Sing Sing Prison Cell Fair Dealers In Both Parties Are Out After Benson's Scalp We have always pointed out as forcefully as we could the domination of labor racketeers over politicians, state and nation­al, but we now find we had only a smattering of knowledge on the In our opinion, Ezra Benson subject. has tried with every means at his We always thought, for instance, disposal to live up to Republican that the influence of Labor Czars campaign promises by . endeavo;- ended at the prison gate and that ing to abolish paternalism tn hts when a union gorilla landed be­agency of the government. hind the bars, his authority auto- Benson, head of the Department matically reverted to his trusty of Agriculture, is a Mormon from lieutenants on the outside. Utah, a type of American holding The power of Joe Fay, however, tenaciously to the unique behef has remained intact as he that every citizen should stand on languished behind the wails of his own two feet. Sing Sing and thoughtfully con- Even during the Thirties when templated labor's gains during Roosevelt was capitalizing on the two administrations in Washing­depression and utilizing human ton. misfortune as an instrument for Politicians all over the East, in­converting the Federal govern- eluding New York's lieutenant ment to Socialism, the Mormons governor and other high public refused to accept what was erron- officials from surrounding States, eously referred to as Federal aid, have beaten a path to the door and worked out their own pro- of his prison cell in order to con­blems. tinue to receive the benefit of But twenty years of govern- his counsel and advice which ap­ment dole finally resulted in con- parently has guided them through­vetting many honest citizens into · out the years of their public set-chiseling bums, even in Utah. vice. Many of them joined in the This is only one small facet of modern version of Coxey's Army government by remote control and which converged on Washington if the invisible forces who exert in October where they appeared supreme power over the heads of before Department of Agricultl~e nations and shape world policies officials, admitted that they could- could only be run down and put n't make a living and demanded in prison, we might eventually be that the government do it for able to recognize. combat, and them. stamp out government by invisible This trek to Washington by a r ulers. horde of glorified drugstore cow- ---------­boys was under the sponsorship of James Patton, president of the National Farmers Union, whose experience in farming has been largely confined to planting the seeds of Socialism in the fertile soil along the banks of the Poto­mac. E"otlowing their appearance Fair Deal politicians in both parties who always tremble when con­fronted with group action and stampede in the face of pressure started yelling for Benson's head. Unless the president stands firmly behind his Secretary of Agriculture and maintains the same political stamina he display­ed on the stump, the first politi­cally honest man to head that agency in two decades may have to either hold h is nose and admin· ister his department in accordance with the policies of Wallace and Brannen or throw in the sponge and quit. Regardless of what course is de­cided on, it will still be just as immoral and unconstitutional for Washington politicians to confis­cate the money of all taxpayers and use it to subsidize farmers and ranchmen as it would be for them to underwrite the expenses of pigeon fanciers, street sweep· ers or baby sitters. Don't be ashamed to be called a flag-waver so long as the banner you hold aloft is the emblem of your own country and not the mongrel b8:dge of conglomerate nations whose ideals have nothing in common with the glorious aims and t raditions of the American Republic. Two Names Which Will Go Down in History Regardless of their position on any other issue, the names ol two mem­bers ol the United States Senate will be written on the nation's imperish­able Roll of Honor for their vote on the adoption o! the Charter of the United Nations. In 1945 when this matter was before that body for consideration, the only two men who had the courage, fore­sight and wisdom to vote against adoption o! this subversive document were Senator William Langer of North Dakota and Senator Henrick Shipstead of Minnesota who repre­sented his state in the Upper House at that time. Unfolding events ol history are proving how right they were in regis­tering their opposition to a world organization designed to de~troy the sovereignty of the American govern­ment and reduce the nation to slave status in a World State. Unbelievable but true: As Senator J oseph R. McCarthy fought almost single-handed and alone in turning up the spy ring in defense and radar plants, the Attorney General's department was investigating him to see if he had violated any fraud statute or the election laws in the handling of his fina nces. Later, they an­nounced that the Wisconsin Sena­tor had a "clean bill of health". It seems he is guilty of nothing more than practicing American­Ism without a license. New York Columnist Republicans Still Have Says We Scooped Him John O'Donnell, Washington correspondent of the New York Daily News claims that we beat him to the draw in the matter of suggesting that Alger Hiss be sprung from the jug on United Nations Day. This is his version of the matter as it appeared in his column in the News on October 16: We don't like to bore the cash customers of this column with our pet peeves, but we have two pro­jects for which we intend to pound the drum. One is this United Nations Day solemnly proclaimed for celebra­tion come October 24. Good, says this reporter. And we intend to use all our energy to spring Alger Hiss from the Federal hoosegow on this date so that he can pre­side at the ceremonies .. For too many lazy days we had merely toyed with the idea of get­ting into print in re this United Nations whoop-de-doo on October 24 (expenses paid by the Ameri­can taxpayer). And so we got scooped and it served us right be­cause, after all, a United Nations celebration is our particular pet peeve. We were just about to say what we thought on this, and honestly had the idea in our mind, when a smart gal from Texas whom we'd long admired from a distance comes up with the same idea and does it better. The lady is Ida M. Darden down in Fort Worth, who many t imes gave us big belly laughs with her deadpan parodies of Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt in a column called "My Night". Now Editor Darden is printing a monthly called the Southern Conservative and comes up with this high grade bit of political satire: On October 24 many groups throughout the country are going to put the little pot in the big pot and whoop it up. The occasion will be United Na­tions Day proclaimed to honor the 1ounding cf the great intenntton."'l organization set up to '~•~d WJr, restore peac<: and insure un ity among all tJt"OJ:les of the earth. As a fitting tribute to that great American patriot, Alger Hiss, in whose brilliant mind this superb instrument tor universal goodwill was born, a movement should be launched to get him sprung from the jug during that one day in order that he, too, may share in the honor to be accorded the child of his fertile brain. Petitions should be sent to pris­on ofiicials demanding that he be released to the temporary custody of some outstanding group of pa­triots such as the Americans for Democratic Action, lor example, who will guarantee his safe return to the institution after he has de­livered a stirring address on loy­alty as his contribution to the day's program. In the event an unsympathetic warden refuses to cooperate by giv­ing him a twenty-four hour parole, perhaps it could be arranged to decorate his cell with the flag of the United Nations while his friends and admirers conduct ap- A Chance to Make Good The repudiation of the Republi­cans in Wisconsin, New Jersey and other places recently can be turned to good advantage if it is intelli­gently evaluated and accepted by the White House as a fair warning. To be brutally frank , voters de­manded a complete change last November and now-a year later -they don't think they have got­ten it. Any other explanation is stupid. It is not too late for the presi­dent to quit consulting left-wing Liber'!ls who did everything with­in their power to defeat him and start taking the advice of Conser­vative Americans who elected him. There is still time to clean out Fair Dealers, both Republicans and Democrats, in the State Depart­ment, in the White House and on his list of possible future appoint­rpents. A majority of Americans voted for a total, prompt and unqualified discoqtinuance of Truman policies all down the line and they didn't mean maybe. They were sickened unto death of exorbitant taxes, Socialism, World Government, foreign aid , Communists in governmen~. Fed­eral interference in private affairs of the citizen, price supports. par­tiality to minority groups, labor union domination , and reckless spending. Period. If they must continue to have a Socialist government, they appar ­ently will return to the custom of selecting experienced and sea· soned Socialists to aQminister it. All decent Americans concede that no greater tragedy could be­fall the nation than for the Amer­ican people to again be subiected to Fair Deal leadership in Wash­ington. But they also seem to feel that ~t is not so hot to have Republicans 1n power who act like Fair Deale~. Texas Supreme Court Debunks Truman's Police Action Claim The Texas Supreme Court in an --:"\ opinion written by Justice Graham B. Smedley, says it was, too, a war and not a "Police Action" that went on lor more than two years in Korea. A case involving double indemnity in an insurance policy carried by a soldier was brought to the State's high court for decision whose mem­bers refused to shut the ir eyes and contribute to the fantaStic delusion that a conflict with more than hun­dred thousand casualties wasn't war. It was an illegal war, it is true, because it was not declared by Con­gress but those whO gave their lives in it are just as dead as it it had received lull ·Congressional sanction. It has always been recognized as a war by every American except a 1itUe mule-headed Missourian who had no part in it except to declare it. ,propriate ceremonies on the ground beneath his window. To carry out this program a com­mittee on arrangements should be selected from among his staunch supporters which would include, among others, Felix Frankfllrlt•r, Harry Truman, Dean Acheson and Eleanor Roosevelt. P• .:...ge_6 ____________T _H_E s_o_u_T_H_E RN _c_o_N_s_E_R_V_A_T_t_v E ______N _ovember-December, 1953 Top Level Russian Communist Directed Compared With Current Type of Traitor Movement Of American Troops In Korea Benedict Arnold Was American Patriot It will come as a horrible shock to many Americans, as it did to us, to learn that in Truman's Police Ac­tion in Korea a Communist in the United Nations was largely respons­ible for directing American t r o o p movements in that undeclared war. This information is contained in a pamphlet released by the American Heritage Protective Committee of San Antonio which goes fully into efforts of llnited Nations to save Red armies from defeat in the recent conflict in Asia. Throughout the Korean War, or Police Action, Arkady A. Sobolev, a Moscow Communist, held the power­ful post of Minister of War, Communi­cations and Inlormation in the United Nations. In this position, all movements of troops and war materials had to be reported to him in advance and other con!idential information passed through his hands. Presumably, he knew beforehand of the death march· es, the planned massacres and organ· ized torture of Americans and South Koreans. Of course this Communist fro m Moscow didn't relay any of this in· formation to Red China! Anyway, we continue not only to allow this international nest of spies to remain here and compel American taxpayers to support them, but we have to stand helplessly by and listen to Americans who should know better prattle about this traitorous outfit being "our only hope of peace." Book By Sworn Communist Collaborator Endorsed By Large Protestant Church In one of the largest Protestant churches in Fort Worth, and presum· ably in many others of this and other denominations, there is a table on which there are leaflets and pamph· lets for distribution to those who come to worship. On the back of one of these pam· phlcts is the printed endorsement of , book containing "62 devotional ;tatcments you will want to read and use." The book is listed as "Living ·with Peace of Mind." According to this printed endorse· ment 11Living With Peace of Mind" is "excellent for use in worship serv­ices and group study; articles in church bulletins and papers; articles in local or· school publications: but most of all for your own pcrson;~.l enrichment.'' The author of this book "Living With Peace of Mind" is Kirby Page. On July 17 of this year, the Com· mittce on Un·American Activities of the House of Representatives of the Eighty-Third Congress, issued a re­port on its investigation of Commun­ist activities in the United States. Appearing before that Committee was Benjamin Gitlow, the first man in the United States to be convicted and sent to prison for his part in the Communist conspiracy. During the 1920's he held many influential posts in the Communist Party and in 1924 and 1928, he was a candidate for vice president on the ..., Cornmunist Party ticket. In 1929 he was expelled .from the Roosevelt And Truman Poisoned The Water Hole The removal of more than fourteen hundred small-fry subversives from government positions by th~ Eisen­hower administration will not only -give Americans a greater feeling of security but will probably make them morE' tolerant ot slow motion per­formance in the While House. AU but five of the subversives were hangovers .from the two previous ad· ministrations .for it was, of course, Roosevelt and Truman who poisoned the water hole and contaminated practically every agency of govern· mcnt with the deadly virus of treason. Practically all unemployed Com­munists, Soviet sympathizers, and crackpot Liberals who couldn't get a job anywhere else were given posi­tions in some branch of the Federal sHvice, where they had a free rein to plan and plot agaimt t"c Unit"rl States party on orders from Joseph Stalin, following Gitlow's refusal to go along with policies which he had finally come to recognize as being aimed at the total destruction of the American form of government. Since that time he has tried to make amends by giving information on the Inside workings of the Com· munist organization to investigating committees and through his writings exposing the Soviet conspiracy. In his sworn statements before the Committee on Un-American Activities Mr. Gitlow, in answer to questions, gave this testimony as shown on page 2075 of Part 6 of the Committee re­port: Mr. Kuozig (Committee Counsel): .. Do you nwan to sny that even though the Communist Party was an atheistic organization, it nevertheless adopted a policy for the infiltration of re· ligious organizations"? Mr. Gitlow: "The policy in those days was framed in such a way that the members of the Communist Party could infiltrate church organizations for U1e purpose of conducting their propaganda among them, for enlist· ing their support for Soviet Russia and for the various campaigns in which the Communists were interest· ed." Mr. Kunzig: "Mr. Gitlow the House Committee on Un·American Activities is interested, of course, in the valu­able background of material which you are giving, but they are also in· tcresled in specific examples, Can you cite any specific examples of these tactics to which you are referring?" Mr. Gitlow: "Certainly. The Rus· sian Communists were the first to ex­ploit ministers of the United States and through them, the church organ· izations. for the purpose of spreading propaganda in favor of Communist Russia and for the building up of a pro-Soviet sentiment among church people in America and among Amer· icans generally. "I will, if I may, make mention of a few of the prominent American re­ligious leaders who were used for that purpose in the early 1920's: Dr. Kirby Page, Dr. Sherwood Eddy, Jer· ome Davis, Dr. Harry F. Ward, the ~resv: .A.~?ert Rhys Williams and oth· It is this same Kirby Page who is author of "Living With Peace of Mind" which church people are urged to read "for your own personal en· richment." We respectfully submit this as one in innumerable cases which prove ~~~·t tt:ei~f~~t~~1t~ c~~rc~t c~0unr~~;; i~ not ('xaclly n failure Americans More Concerned About Communism Than Sex There is one encouraging piece of news out of Washington which indicates that decency still holds precedence over d e g e n e r a c y among the people of the United States. The report of the Senate Judic­iary sub-committee headed by Senator William Jenner of Ind­iana called Hlnterlocking Subver­sion in Government Departments" is selling in greater volume than the Kinsey Report. The Jenner Report gives a clear and convincing picture of the Com· munist plot within the Federal government and shows how far the conspiracy against the United States has advanced in that quar­ter. The Kinsey Report is a collec­tion of obscene statistical data on sex gathered through interviews with a few thousand prostitutes and female extroverts. An Eastern newspaper quotes Mrs. Mamie Eisenhower as having given her public endorsement to the United Nations and as having referred to it as our only instrument of peace. Oh no? We can't go through that again! For almost two centuries the name of Benedict Arnold stood out on the nation's roll of dishonor as the one and only traitor to his country. Today this roster of infamy is so crowded with the !ist cf betrayers who have fallen all over each other in the rush to sell us out, that the memory of the original conspirator against the safety and security of the United States has been shoved clear out of the picture. Also, it is getting more and more difficult to break down this swelling list of conspirators into groups and decide where "liberalism'' leaves oU and treason begins. Candidates for the national Hall of Shame no longer include only such proved traitors as the Rosenbergs, Alger Hiss, Judy Coplon, Greenglass, Sobel, Gold and the small·fry subver­sives kicked out of government agen­cies recently. ·They take in such high· bracket personalities in all walks ot life that uncounted thousands of con· fused Americans are gradually drift­ing across the line which marks the difierence between loyalty and trea­son, without consciousness of their contribution to the nation's betrayal. After all, Benedict Arnold merely sought to advance the interests o! England. as opposed to those of the United States, and since this later came to be our national policy of government and in view of more dastardly acts committed by our mod­ern, streamlined type of traitor, per­haps we should re·write a chapter of American history and portray Arnold as a devoted patriot. Youth Group Urged To Oppose Senator Who Exposes Communist Spies In Radar Plants For too many years, the Ameri­can people have been tolerant of the inane bleatings of Eleanor Roosevelt on the charitable theory that she was totally without under­standing of the potential harm to her country implied in the ex· pressions of her cockeyed philos· ophy. We have always maintained that she knew exactly what she was doing and saying and that her par­tiality to anti-American proposals, Communism In Education Traced To Its Source Those who have watched the dry-rot of Communism and Social­ism attack the public school sys, terns in many parts.. . of the country and couldn't understand the source of con\a,mination, should read a new book put out by the Meador Press of Boston. The author is Verne P. Kaub of Madison, Wisconsin, who is one of the nation's highest authorities on the subject of the infiltration of this deadly economic and social disease and an expert in tracing its slimy course from Moscow on down into the core of American schools and churches. The name of the book is "Com­munist- Socialist Propaganda in American Schools" and it tells Americans many things they need to know about the National Edu­cation Association which directs the thinking of American school teachers. movements and individuals was deliberate and was indicative of her real sentiments. Whether we are right in our assumption or not, no one can dispute that she knew what sl)e was saying when she went on the air in New York recently and ad­vised a 1'Youth Group" to "have the courage to oppose McCarthy­ism" and added that they should not be afraid to voice their dis­approval of his methods. This statement followed by a few hours the disclosure by Sen­ator McCarthy that Communist spies were operating inside radar plants and that a network of es­pionage extendiqg throughout our defense system had been indicated by sworn testimony of one witness after another. This implied defense of those who are trying to destroy the Am­erican government from the inside, keeps her record along that line intact. In all the years she has been bouncing around over the globe, we have never yet known her to utter one word against sub· versives or in defense of Ameri­canism. If her latest performance does not turn the stomach of every Am­erican who is alarmed for the safety and security of his country, that organ must be made of cast iron. Lynn Landrum o£ the Dallas Morn­ing News suggests that ministers should do something more about Com· munist infiltration of the churches than getting purple in the face. November-December, 1953 THE SOUTHERN CONSERVATIVE Page 1 ., Oscar Ewing Is Out But His Dream of Republican Women Denounce Houston Socialized Medicine Is Coming True Newspaper Owned By Cabinet Member Communist or Socialist policies, which are one and the same, do not become fastened on a D..:!tion sudden­ly, but worm their way in by a grad­ual process, always under the guise of a necessary service. That is what is happening in this country right now regarding Social­ized Medicine. Although the Constitution of the United States makes no provision for it and although the Congress has re­fused to enact legislation providing for mass medication, it looks like we are going to have it forced on us any way. Dr. Walter B. Martin, president­elect of the American Medical Assoc­iation warned of it in an address to the Southern Medical Association at Atlanta, Georgia, recently. Speaking of Federal medical serv­ices in general, Dr. Martin said: "Already a large number of people have a vested interest in Federal med­ical care. Other groups may be added such as Federal government employes, their dependents, the indigent and medically indigent in our general population ... "Of this we may be sure. The pres­ent situation will not remain as it is. Federal medicine will continue to ex­pand as it has e.xpanded during the last fifteen years unless the trend is reversed by the informed voting pOP­ulation of this country." Of course the "informed voting POP­ulation" of this country thought they had "reversed the trend" last Novem­ber, only to find that the man they selected to lead them out of Socialism and away from such things as Social­ized Medicine had, somehow, become obligated to set up a whole new de­partment at a time when the Ameri­can people were demanding a reduc­tion, rather than an increase, in Fed­eral agencies. It is this new department which is gradually bringing Socialized Med­icine to Americans who, only a year ago, thought they were taking proper action to stamp it out. This new department was brought into being as a result of one in­dividual's whim, but prouably could not be abolished through the com­bined efforts and opposition of mil­lions of Americans which seems to us a perversion of the theory of a "gov­ernment of the people, for the people and by the people." Any way, Socialized Medicine is gradually creeping up on us accord­ing to the AMA head, who should certainly be the highest available authority on the subject in this coun­try. Oscar Ewing has gone from govern~ rnent but it is obvious that his blue­print for Socialized Medicine was re­tained in the files. NEXT EDITION WILL BE OUT IN JANUARY Every year, we put out the Novem­ber and December issues of the South­ern Conservative in one edition. This is to allow us time to try to Jinance the paper for the coming year. Since the Southern Conservative opposes Communism, Socialism, and all other Un-American ideologies, we do not receive financial assistance from large Foundations and other wealthy groups who sponsor only such movements, activities and publications whose objectives are to eventually destroy the American form of gov­ernment and set up a totalitarian State. Those who want to help make this distasteful financial chore easier for us may make check payable to the Southern Conservative Foundation, Inc., (chartered by the State of Texas as a non-profit, tax-exempt activity.) Address 703 Flatiron Building, Fort Worth, Texas. Commentator Pays Tribute To Southern Conservative We are very much indebted to Don Bell, political commentator on Radio Station KOME at Tulsa, for some complimentary references to the Southern Conservative. Preceding one of his recent broadcasts on the United Nations, Mr. Bell took time to hand us this nice bouquet: Before beginning our special re­port this evening, I should like to take timeio pay tribute once again to a patriotic and brilliant editor, Ida M. Darden of Fort Worth, Texas, whose newspaper, the Southern Conservative, should be in the home of every patriot in the United States. Her writings are always bril­liant but there are times when her special gift of sarcasm and wit get the job done better than all the serious word-wranglings of all the rest of us put together. In her last edition, she's done it again. I am going to assume that per­mission is granted to broadcast it and take the chance, because her article concerning the United Na­tions and October 24-offtcially pro­claimed eighth birthday of this atheistic order of One-Worlders, Internationalists, Socialists, Com­munists, ADA'ers and what have you-is too precious to pass un­noticed by a single person within hearing distance of this or any other radio station. Under the headline "It Seems Unfair to Observe United Nations Day While Its Founder is Still in Stir" Editor Darden writes this: "On October 24 many groups throughout the United States will put the little pot in the big pot and whoop it up. The occasion will be United Na­tions Day proclaimed to honor the founding of the great international organization set up to end war, re­store peace and insure unity among all peoples of the earth. As a fitting tribute to that great American patriot, Alger Hiss, in whose brilliant mind this superb instrument for good will was born, a movement should be launched to get him sprung from the jug during that one day in order that he, too, may share in the honor to be accorded the child of his fertile brain. Petitions should be sent to pris­on officials demanding that he be released to the temporary custody of some outstanding group of pat­riots, such as the Americans For Democratic Action , for example, who will guarantee his safe return to the institution after he has de­livered a stirring address on loy· alty as his contribution to the day's program. In the event an unsympathetic warden refuses to cooperate by giving him a twenty-four hour pa­role, perhaps it could be arranged to decorate his cell with the_i!ag of the United Nations while his friends and admirers conduct ap- "We owe to posterity as much se­curity and freedom as the Founding Fathers provided for our forebears to pass on to us and we will regret the day we fail this obligation"-Edward w. Focke, Dayton, Ohio. We suppose we can breathe easier now that Eric Johnston has been sent to the Far East to ease tension. Mr. Johnston who once visited Russia and came back with words of praise for that country, was also a tension easer for Tru­man. We hope he has better luck easing tension in India than he did in Texas one time when he m1de one of his rip-snorting speeches in defense of an anti­Southern motion picture. In that case no tension was eased and censors went right ahead and ban­ned the picture as if he had not spoken. Walter Reuther has won a thump­ing victory. Senator Irving M. Ives of New York has been named chairman of a Senate labor sub-committee to make recommendations to the next Congress on amendments to the Taft­Hartley law. What a tribute to the late author of that measure. Maybe it's the result of Progressive Education which makes modern chil­dren so much more advanced than those of another day but anyway Police Departments of many cities had to call out reserves and extra squads this year to keep the kiddies from shooting up the town in what were once simple and harmless Halloween pranks. Even though our national indebt­edness is somewhere around $270,000,- 000,000, the American people have just been informed that we gave away in Foreign Aid $7,000,000,000 in the year ending July 30. What we can't understand is how an individual, or a nation, can give away something they don't have. propriate ceremonies on the ground beneath his window. To carry out this program a committee on arrangements should be selected from a m o n g his staunch supporters which would include, among others, Felix Frankfurter, Harry Truman, Dean Acheson and Eleanor Roosevelt.'' That was written, as I said be­fore, by Ida M. Darden. While this article may seem exceptional be­cause of its timeliness and biting humor, it's just part of one column of eight pages of newspaper which is crammed full of authentic in­formation, edited so you can un­derstand the importance of the news. Send her five dollars, your name and the name of a friend whom you'd like to read the paper, too, and then get prepared for twelve monthly editions containing art­icles which live up to her editorial slogan-"Millions of Americans think it-the Southern Conserva­tive says it." The Houston Post, owned partly by a member of President Eisenhower's Cabinet, was strongly denounced in a recent resolution passed by the Executive Board of the Women's Re­publican Club of Harris County, With headquarters in Houston. The ire of the Republican women was directed against the Post as a result of a recent series of articles by one Ralph O'Leary attacking various unrelated groups and individuals be­cause they opposed the practice of tax-supported institutions being turn­ed over to subversive speakers who come to that city to promote Com­munism, Socialism and other New Deal and Fair Deal objectiv«!.S. "We are gravely concerned about the future prospects of the Republican Party, especially in Texas," says the preamble of the resolution. · "We appreciated and approved the recent effort of Mr. Leonard Hall, the chairman of the national execu­tive committee, on his recent visit to Texas to solidify and inspire the groups who united their efforts in the., last presidential campaign. His ef­forts, however, we fear, have beoo nullified by recent events to which we shall now refer: "We deprecate and deplore tne un­founded and unfair attack the Hous­ton Post is making upon the civic, religious and political actions of the large groups of vigilant, conservative­minded citizens in such patriotic, civic and religious organizations as the Minute Women, the Committee tor the Preservation of Methodism, the Circuit Riders and the Citizens Con~ servative League. "To this group of patriotic and con­servative citizens, the nation and the Republican Party are largely indebted for the election o( President Eisen­hower and the turning of the tide against Communism, Socialism and One-Worldism which had all but de­stroyed our constitutional republican form of government. "Especially do we deplore such an attack by the Houston Post in view of the fact that it may be reasonably considered an organ of the present administration in view of its owner­ship and control by a member of the President's cabinet. "The fact that some of the indi­viduals being attacked may have op­posed, by letters to their senators or representatives or to the President, making the Secretary of Education, Health and Welfare a Cabinet post, is no justification, in our minds, for such an unfair attack, yet is reason­ably suspected to be one, if not th lillt principal, motive !or it ... " 't Copies of the resolution were fur­nished newspapers, local, state and national leaders of the Republican Party, and the Speaker of the national House of Representatives. Evidently Alger Hiss hasn't changed since being put behind bars. His New York attorney said recently that his client didn't want any publicity when he makes his next attempt to get a parole and added: 11publicity never helps this kind of thing". Hiss didn't want any publicity either when he was doing the things that landed him in prison and he was protect­ed from it by two men in the White House. Working with Alger Hiss in draw­ing the first draft of the United Na- ~~~~Isi~a~~o :~~ ~~s~i;~r~~~r~f ~~ American State Department at the time. At San Francisco, these two worked side by side. And look what we got! ,,I I ··· Page 8 THE SOUTHERN CONSERVATIVE November-December, 1953 Texas Man Must Prove He Overall Security of Republic Is Paramount to Petrilla's Gorillas Put W B 0 Los His Job The Bite On Dick Haymes as orn r e Political Fortunes of Any Man or Set of Men Like Tennyson's brook, the pl~e~rin30ahnb!~;h 0~£H;hu:t~n~d=~~ The destinies of the human race top-flight Communist traitors in far- troubles of Dick Haymes, the Hol~ government, is in serious difficulties have always been moulded by leaders ~~~f. agencies of the Federal ,govern- !~;:~~~-crooner, seem to run on which may result in the loss of his who recognized and grasped oppor- Friendly support, public encourage-job tunity when it 1\nocked at the door. ment and cordial cooperation by the As if divorces, lawsuits, alimony, It seems he is unable to prove that A hill at Toulon gave Napoleon his President with a Wisconsin senator, blondes, income taxes and bouts he was bGrn and the government opportunity and he beat back the instead of confidential consultations with immigration authorities were won't take his word for it. ~r;~sl~fa~~v~~~a~~i~~1e~ aE~~g~:,li~~ ~~~honalyN~:Veyi~~u:~v~~~10l'm:C~~~~ ·~~! ~:~r1~~np;!~!~~:io~o~~ll~~~~ There is a federal rule that all arm of the ocean gave Nelson his op- people with a greater feeling of secur- cians were reported to have put ~::cl:~~s t~~s;o~:v:t:c~~~~t~:r;~!~ fs~~t~~~~v :nndd ~~ddees~rnoit~~dh~i;ir~~; i~~ ~~i~o~~'us~soto h~~~r~e~•~iti~~ the bite on him for hundreds of of the sea. reflected glory which now shines on dollars before they would "per .. cate proving that, at some time in the One of the most tragic examples of the lone and resplendent figure of mit" him to sing in a night club. past, they were born and are not just lost opportunity in history was re- Joe McCarthy who doggedly followed Before this Musical Maffia gets trying to pull a fast one in claiming corded when the Eisenhower admin- the slimy Communist trail right into through with him, Haymes will th~r.w~f~~ knows that he was born ~t~\~~~i~~i~e~oi~r~b=~d O:~edi~~c~~~ th~h~e~~~;ic~~~r~~~~e d:::n~~-t pri- probably withdraw all objections in Lubbock, Texas, thirty-eight years mediately , openly and solidly behind marily interested in inter-party bick- to deportation proceedings and be ago but his superiors take a dim view a concentrated drive to halt treason ering, jealous factions or petty dis· willing and glad to go back to of the whole thing and seem to feel and smoke Communists out of gov- agreements over "methods" but they Argentina where only one racket that he has entered some sort of ernment. are vitally concerned in the safety is permitted to be operated and collusion with unknown conspirators One valiant member of the Republi- and security of their country which that is the one run by Peron him .. to prove that he is here on ear~h can Party had already risked his is faced with the greatest threat to its self. when, as a matter of fact, he is still personal reputation and imperil&d his survival since a bleak winter at Valley ---------- dwelling in Never-Never land. political future by pointing the way Forge in those desolate days of the At the date of his birth no records toward exposure and elimination of long ago. were kept in Lubbock, his family moved away from there when he was _ five years old and he can locate no one in that city who is willing to testily to his birth. The incident reminds us of the late Will Rogers who, on applying for a visa to visit some foreign coun­try was asked for his birth certificate. He told the immigration official he didn't have any. He was then asked if he could produce a witness who would testify to his birth and the noted humorist replied: "No, I can't even do that. Out in Claremore, Okla­homa, where I was born, we didn't have any witnesses. It was a sort o£ private matter." He got his visa. All Honor To The Governor Of Utah For one of the most outstanding examples of courage, wisdol'll: and sheer Americanism, we pay tnbute to the Honorable J. Bracken Lee, governor of the sovereign State of Utah. Not only did he stand alone and unashamed at the Conference of Governors at Seattle in demand­ing the passage of a resolution call·. ing • for an investigation of the United Nations and its possible in­fringement on the American Cot;­stitution, but he also proved h1s undivided loyalty to the United States by refusing to call on the citizens of Utah to observe United Nations Day. "I do not wish to give the Unit~ ed Nations my support until I am fully convinced that it is in the best interests of the American citizens" Governor Lee said in ex­plaining why he would have no part in promoting ceremonies hon­oring this world group. In an era marked by knee-bend· ing subservience on the part of high officials to subversive propa­ganda movements, the action of the Utah governor is as refreshing and reviving to lagging spirits as a gentle shower of rain on the parched sands of the desert. \Ve wonder who started the fad of making ex-Army Generals presidents of universities and on what did they base their conclusions that they are quaJified for such posts? What We Don't Need Is More Reformers A meeting of career ladies was held in Houston sometime ago which, according to press :reports, was attend­ed by "a group of successful women who aren't content to sit back until certain reforms have been accomp· lished both in their own localities and throughout the world." One of their aims, it was stated, is to secure universal jury service for women and another is "to improve the condition o.f women in countries where the female is still confined to home, child and husband care." In our opinion, these good ladies could find many things more worth­while to get worked up over. Personally, we thank them for try­ing to get us a job serving on a jury but we don't want it. We just don't care to be locked up over night with a hung jury, male or female, and we are willing to get juicy morsels of scandal in divorce cases and the gory details of murder trials from some other source. Also, we can see nothing grievous· ly wrong in a situation which compels women to stay home with their hus­band and children, attend to their own knitting and let outside activities go hang. Energetic nnd nosey groups of wom­en who are knocking themselves out trying to institute both domestic and international reforms need to be re­minded that the world is staggering now from well-intentioned interfer­ence by meddlers trying to work out their destiny. What we need is fewer, and not more, reformers to save the people of the various countries around the globe. We have a sneaking suspicion that if we will just let them alone, they will save themselves. Any way, most of them don't want to be saved. If the good ladies want to render a real service to mankind, they should initiate a movement whose objective is to reform the reformers and give humanity a good long rest from the bores who want to make people over Meantime, far from advocating changes and reforms in everything and everybody, we are firmly o£ the conviction that the private and polit· ical morals o! the nation would be greatly improved if we could only get back where we used to be. We'd gladly settle for that. Who remembers when the National Farmers Union was composed of farmers? Only The Guilty Invoke The Fifth Amendment One of the most disgusting spec­tacles Americans have witnessed in recent years is the constant par­ade of suspected subversives be­fore Congressional . investigating committees demanding protection of an instrument which they seek to dishonor. There are those who feel that some of these Fifth Amendment Americans who refuse to say whe­ther or not they are Communists, are merely taking this position as a matter of principle and may not necessarily be Communists. We want to go on record that we think every man and woman who has hidden behind the Fifth Amendment in order to keep from incriminating themselves, are, or have been, Communists, and that they don't know what principle is .. Accompanied by a slick lawyer, they almost invariably refuse hon~ est answers to any question and spend all their time before the committee in concocting evasive, misleading and equivocal replies. Nobody can convince us that every last one of them, male and female are not, or have not been, Com­munist skunks. The natural impulse of any American who is completely inno· cent of subversive connections would be not only to deny such af· filiations emphatically but they would be so insulted at the impli· cation of such affiliation that they would express their resentment in no uncertain terms. For that matter, they are not called before the Committee in the first place unless there is convin­cing evidence that they have en­gaged in subversive activities..:. Americans are getting tired of the Fifth Amendment to the Con· stitution being employed in the protection of our internal enemies and it is possible that action may be taken at the next session of Congress which will make it im­possible for this provision to be used as a shield for traitors. It Could Have Been Worse But Not Much For twenty years presidents of the United States have made ap• pointments which have offended the American conception of quali­fied material for high office and there is no particular reason why we should have been so upset over the selection of Earl Warren as Chief Justiae of the Supreme Court. After all, we were around when the other members of that body were named. It was just that the vacancy on the court offered an occasion be­yond compare for the new ad~ ministration to retrieve the high tribunal from mediocrity, and be~ gin to build it back toward the place in public confidence 1t once enjoyed, and we couldn't believe this opportunity would be passed up. There is no question of the per­sonal honesty and integrity of the New Chief Justice but there is serious doubt of his ability to keep his left-wing political views from creeping into his judicial de~ cisions. The world is full of men who are able to draw a fine line be~ tween their impeccable personal behavior and their deplorable po· litical action. As private citizens, they meti~ culously obey the Ten Command· ments but as public officials, they totally ignore the Constitution. Perhaps we are too pessimistic and are magnifying the potential harm to our institutions and tra­ditions out of all proportion to the actual danger. Maybe a miracle will happen and Warren will turn out to be an able and impartial jurist who will reflect glory and credit on his exalted position. Stranger things have happened, although we can't think when. In the meantime, we will try to remember that we should be thankful for many things. We should probably be grateful that we don't have a Federal Bu· reau of Spiritual Service called the Department of Religion with Father Divine as its head.
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