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The Southern Conservative, Vol. 9, No. 10, October 1958
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The Southern Conservative, Vol. 9, No. 10, October 1958 - File 001. 1958-10. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 12, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/southern/item/273/show/264.

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(1958-10). The Southern Conservative, Vol. 9, No. 10, October 1958 - File 001. The Southern Conservative. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/southern/item/273/show/264

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The Southern Conservative, Vol. 9, No. 10, October 1958 - File 001, 1958-10, The Southern Conservative, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 12, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/southern/item/273/show/264.

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Title The Southern Conservative, Vol. 9, No. 10, October 1958
Contributor
  • Darden, Ida M.
Publisher Southern Conservative
Date October 1958
Language English
Subject
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
Place
  • Fort Worth, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 10604411
Collection
  • Houston Metropolitan Research Center
  • Ida M. Darden Collection
  • The Southern Conservative
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Houston Metropolitan Research Center.
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript THE SOUTHERN CONSERVATIVE -Tb Plead for a Return of Constitutional Government- Vol. 9 FORT WORTH, TEXAS, OCTOBER, 1958 No. 10 We Can't Condemn Russia Any More We Have Our Own Police State Now .. How Mucb Is Doggie In The That Sputnik .. ? An imaginary interview with the "Mutt in the Sput" was released while Congress was still in session by the National Taxpayers Confer· ence or Oklahoma City in which, with canine frankness which would have put his inhuman masters to shame, this tiny mongrel revealed the real reason why the Communists released their terrifying little space ship in which he was the sole passenger. "One promise my Russian masters intend to keep is that of forcing the United States to spend itself into banl<ruptcy - a promise made years ago by Comrade Lenin in his plan for world conquest." said Fido in his first press conference with space reporters after sailing off into the blue. F-rankly, we were disturbed when the United St~ .go\l'ernm&n began to li ve within its income a few years ago and we became real worried last year when the American people woke up long enough to protest an all~time high spending budget," Fido chuckled and added: "Drastic measures were imperative! That's why T took off in my space ship to circle the globe. Brother, did it work! Already I've com· pelled Congress to raise the debt ceiling. And the spending I sparked is now being fanned by the recession to the extent that a $15 billion deficit is possible for next year. "Now if we can get Congress to approve all the pump·priming pro· grams and anti-recession tax handouts under consideration, without arousing the American people, we've got it made! My bosses in the Kremlin are so confident of success they have already chosen the re­ceiver for a bankrupt America, and our factories are turning out chains for its citizens." In order to thwart the dire predictions of American bankruptcy voiced by Fido, the National Taxpayers Conference suggested that Arnerican taxpayers write their senators at the Senate Office Building and their representative at the House Office Building, Washington. D. C. and demand a halt to fiscal folly and a return to sound. government, adding that such letters will not be ignored in an election year. We hate to throw cold water on the deal but we seriously fear that the taxpayers are going to find that their senators and representatives are not hair as well informed as the dog, and that they are going to keep on spending like the launchers of the Sputnik intended they should. OH SHEIK OF ARABY WHAT ABOUT US? Since reading so much about the reported invitation of an Arab Sheik to Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt to become one of his harem beauties and join his royal household as his fortieth wife, we have perked up and taken on new life. After all, who knows but what some old near-sighted. decrepit and moth-eaten harem-owner might not make us a similar offer and invite us to become his ninety-ninth favorite? In the meantime, and in anticipation of such a potential proposal, we are thinking seriously of buying us a Hula Hoop and giving it a whirl to limber up our joints. In this way we should be in shape to contribute our part to the social festivities of the harem by doing the Salome Dance. For years on end, anxious Americans have pointed out that International Communism was closing in on us and that massive corruption and top-level betrayal was heading us straight toward a Police State. But a quarter century of brainwashing had prior claim on the public mind and apathetic citizens took refuge in the thread­bare cliche: "It can't happen here." So today, a Red Star shines over Little Rock; the Iron Curtain has been drop· ped over a Sovereign State and Federal Dictatorship is all but absolute. State Sovereignty has been wiped out, the Tenth Amendment invalidated, local election returns rendered null and void and State legislation repealed. Not by Constitutional amendment, or vote of the people, was this drastic change in our form of government brought about, nor yet by popular Revolution. It was wrought by "udicial edict of nine old. power·drunl<. 1y· rants safely holed up for life in the Supreme Court in Washington and to whom no rights are any lonqer sacred except those of Negroes and Communists. It's not a question now of the American poeple wakjng up and saving their freedom because it's virtually lost. From this point on, it's a Reclamation Job and the fight to regain the Republic will be long, bitter and heart· breaking.because-let's face it-brute force is lined up solidly against us and the opponents of Constitutional Government are in control. . ~n the front doors of four L\ttle Rock High Schools on September thirtieth, stunned passers-by read this notice: "This school closed by order of the Federal Government.'' Not only did this sign convey to thousands of young American students the amazing fact that their educational processes had been forcibly halted by judicial interference but it served also as a death sym4 bol of a Free Republic and as an official warning to American citizens that Constitutional Government had all but come to an end in the United States. For years our national policy has been to keep up the pretense of tr:Ying to "contain Communism" in other lands and to this purported end, we have sent billions of dollars across the ocean, erected military bases in far-flung places of the earth and have deployed our troops to various countries throughout the world. Now we can stop sending money abroad, demobilize our army in­stallations and bring our soldiers home. 'Vhile our fighting forces were centered in alien territory to pro­tect foreign countries from the menace of Communism, the Reds took over an important sector on our own home front. True to Communist tradition, the seizure of the Little Rock public school system was accomplished without the firing of a shot or the loss of a life and was engineered by American Quislings, fifth columnists and fellow travellers occupying high and responsible posts in the Ameri· can government. Neither was the conquest of Little Rock brought about in a day, but rather it was overthrown "with all deliberate speed." It was the culmination of long years of Communist encroachment in which the rights of the American people in ,other fields than educa­tion were gradually swept away. (Continued on Page 2) Millions of Americans Think It-The Southern Conservative Says It Page 2 THE SOUTHERN CONSERVATIVE Octobe,, 1958 Cioaf1room Moves Beat The Southerners ti.ay Work for South In Smith Bill Vote Return of Two-Th~1·ds Ru!e From a subscriber in Sarasota, Florida: "We think you are a most extraordinary bdy and appreciate your work greatly. As you know Claude Pepper was defeated Washington, D. C. school author­Hies are reported in the press to have instructed school teachers the1·e to go easy on sex educntion of the students. a subject on wl1ich progressive educators have been bearing down heavily. The reason for the let-up in this type of in­struction is obvious. Washington schools are .int.egratt:d ltnd are composed of almost 70 per cent colored. The Negroes don't need instruction along this tine. They have been giv~ng practical demon­strations in the subject which has put the teachers on the ropes and caused them to practically tear out their hair. "An example to the Na­tion." (Columbia, South Carolina, Record, August 23, 1958) The Columbia Record Washington Bureau WASHINGTON-The political mane\!_­vering of Lyndon Johnson of Texas was being credited on Capitol Hill, today, with having defeated the South by a one-vote margin on the motion to re-commit-and thereby kill-the Smith States' Rights bill. Johnson,openlyheraldedasperhapsthe mostbrilliantmajorityleaderevertocon­trol the Senate, was the recipient of hearty back-slaps from the liberals and muffled epithets from the Southern con- 5ervatives. The Southerners' anger arose primarily from the fact that they had present in the Senate at the time the vote was taken enough votes to keep the Smith bill alive. As the voting time approached, the South­erners had 46 pledged votes; the liberals had39. But Senate Majority Leader Johnson managed the impossible, and killed the bill. This is the way he is reported to havedoneit: • 1. He talked Senator George Smathers of Florida, whose vote the Southerners needed, into "pairing" his vote with that of an absent senator-Mike Monroney of Oklahoma, who would have voted to re­commit the bill. That left the Southerners with 45 votes, the liberals with 39. 2. He got Senator Milton Young of North Dakota, a co-sponsor of the Smith Bill, to "take a walk." That left the score at 44 for the Southerners and 39 for the liberals. 3. He induced Sen. Allen Frear of Dela­ware, who was pledged to vote with the South, to hide out In the Marble Room, just off the tioor of the Senate. That re­duced the Southern margin to 43-39. 4. He convinced Sen. Frank Lausche of Ohio, also pledged to the Southern bloc, that he should vote for the motion tore­commit the bill, because otherwise a fili­buster would ensue and vital national legislation would be held up indefinitely. (Lausche admitted this on the Senate floor the following day, saying he voted against his own better judgment in the matter.) Lausche Jtad switched his vote, and that left the Southerners with 42-40. 5. As the vote was being taken, John­tiOn sent Majority Secretary Bobby Baker to the Democratic cloakroom, where Sen. Robert Kerr of Oklahoma was wating for his name to be called, so he could vote with the South. Baker advised Kerr that it w::~s going to be a tie vote, if Kerr voted, and Vice President Nixon would break the tie by voting to recommit the bill. This, Baker argued, would give Nixon credit for the liberals' victory, and would enhance Nix­on in the North as a presidential candi­date. Kerr agreed it would be unwise for him to vote, under those circumstances, and remained in the cloakroom. That left the vote standing at 41 for the Southerners and 40 for the liberals. 6. As Baker was holding Kerr in the Democratic cloakroom, Sen. Everett Dirk- 5en of Illinois was dispatched by Johnson to the Republican cloakroom, where Sen. Wallace Bennett of Utah was preparing to come onto the floor and vote against recommittal. Dirksen told Bennett that if he voted with the South it would tie the vote up 11nd put the Vice President and Senate Minority Leader William Knowland on the spot. He argued that it would be best for Nixon not to be recorde.d on such a controversial measure, because no mat­ter how he voted, it would hurt his presi­dential candidacy In some part of the country. He also argued that Nixon would prob­ably vote to recommit the Smith bill, and Southerners who have not given up all hope of reformation of the once great Democratic Parly and its restoration as a party 6i prin­ciples, are dircu~sing th~ J:::l~'"ibi l­ity of further attempts to c ct the two~thirds rule for nominaLinr;:; can­didates restored. Many Southerners foueht :::.~ainst the abrogation of this mle by Roosevelt's stooges at the 1936 Convention in Phil~delph i a but the majority of Democrats, displaying about as much independe!1ce and courage as broken-backed cater­pillars, fell in with the scheme, thereby insuring that never again would the party be enabled to nominate big men as candidates for President on the Democratic ticket. lt will be interesting to see how much strength the movement to re­store this rule ·is able to assemble for it is only by this step that the deterioration and ultimate disinte-the U. S. Senate. Thi.s we was due to the womens' vote." Whoever did it, rende1·ed the.State of Florida a great service. Corruption on the part of a Pres­idential Aide is not new in Amer­ican politics and it is difficult to understand why the Adams case should cause so much furor. After all, Harding had his Gaston Means; Roosevelt his Harry Hopkins, Tru­man his General Vaughn and Eis- From a subscriber in Westfield, enhower his Sherman Adams. And Massachusetts: "I am very glad until we place incorruptible, pat- you had such a well-deserved va­riotic and dedicated Americans in cation and I note that it has not the White House again, there will injured your vocabulary in any probably be other cases. wau." ~--~--------------~---------- --- We Can't Condemn Russia gration of the party can be halted. (Continued from Page 1) (Editor's note: The above edito- We had already given up, for instance, the right to receive, hold in rial appeared in the March, 1950, our hands and dispose of, the money we earn in our profession, craft edition of the Southern Conserva· or trade. Instead, it is deducted from our pay checks and diverted to tive but the hope expressed therein political confidence men in Washington who fritter it away without ex~ :sssi~~l~t~a~~zes~ci:"'i~he~h~;o;~~~; planation, apology-or accounting. Williams, John Kennedy, Estes Ke- We have surrendered, except in a handful of States, the God-given fauver, Lyndon Johnson, Averill right of an American citizen .to work and earn a living for his family Harriman or other political incom- without being forced to pay tnbute to labor union racketeers. petents being placed on the ticket If we are farmers, we have been deprived of our right to plant and for the highest office in the land in work our crops according to the dictates of our own judgment, and ap- 1960, the subject of revival of the praisal of our own personal needs, without special permission from a two-thirds rule becomes of para- corps of agricultural spies in Washington who lope up and down the fur­mount importance. It requires rows in every field trying to sniff out violation of a despicable and un· action by Democrats of a rna- . Cqpstitutional Agricultural Adjustment Act. jority of the States to restore · We have lost our right to engage in Free Enterprise on which the this rule and surely twenty- economy of this nation is based, without having to suffer murderous five party leaders in this num- competition from tax~free, cooperative business ventures financed by ber of the sovereign States the Federal government with our own tax money. should be able to see the necessity We have lost the right to provide our own Social Security and to of such a step if the party is not to accumulate means for insuring Old Age Assistance to members of our suffer total degeneration. The fact own family by being forced into a compulsory insurance scheme, to say that Modern Republicans have mur- nothing of having lost our self-respect when our government forced us ~f~~s:h:ni~~:~~o~~~rt~o~~!~:J to participate in these crooked Socialist plans which make us objects by the Democrats will win the 1960 of charity and wards of the Federal government. election should make the responsi- We have lost our right to vote for honest, God·fearing men of in~ bility of Democratic Party leaders tegrity, patriotism and vision as candidates for the Presidency of the in the matter all the clearer. Unless United States through the adoption of the tenets of International Com­those who control State Democrat- munism by both the Republican and Democratic Parties. ic Party affairs have become total- We have lost our Constitutional right to have tariff duties levied Jy depraved, they should exert by merr.-bers of the Congress which we elect and, as a result, must con­every possible effort to save the tend With cut-throat foreign competition and see our own markets de· Republic from the fate of having strayed by articles of trade produced by slave tabor in alien lands. ~~~so~~e f~~m theent:~i~~e-~:"W~~~ . All these and scores of other inherent, inalienable and Constitutional House in 1960.) ~~g~~~~fee ;:~~ ~~;e~~:r~u~"~eb~r~~~ b~~i~he ~~~i1~gao~i~s~fi~~e b~~~o;~ American culture of which we ~~~!~~~~~o~~~t~~~e;hnem~~e~i~~ns~e~~b~ic~iniature Soviet System in a have such a surplus that we have to send it to Russia by Negro roc'k­and- roll performers, is about to be greatly enhanced. Allied Artists is going to film the story of an Am­erican celebrity whose life and be­havior should be an example to the youth of the nation and inspire them to great and noble deeds. The "Great American" whom Al­lied Artists is going to honor is the late Mr. Al Capone of Chicago and Alcatraz. this would place him at odds with Sen. Knowland, who is running for Governor of California. Knowland and Nixon should show a "solid front," Dirksen contended, and the only way this could be done would be for Bennett to vote. to recom· mit, and take the vice president off the hook. Bennett finally gave in, and came out of the cloakroom, and cast his vote with the liberals, giving them the balance of power and defeating the Smith bill 41-40. So, boys and girls, this is it! Say what you want to but we've had it! !f they can close the_ schools in Little Rock, they can close the churches ~~:~~;~;o~:~yh~~~~~~lsi~ns:i~~i~~~~~_' the power p!ant in Tallahassee ~ince hatred of tyranny ~n~ love of freedom is deeply implanted in :'-mencan heart~, per~aps this mherent spirit and love of liberty and mdependence will spnng forth again in a coming generation who will recaptur~ a Republic whic~ n9w appears to be sealed, signed and ready ~~~:t~!~~et~e~h~ ~~~~~~!t~~nt~e cgoo~:~~!~t ~r~~~"Jnffe~ s~~f:s~ternal good 0~e~~~~ ~~~h~hi~!ti~~e ;;~ ~~r~~t"~o t~~! ~~r~~:!n t~~ti~~~e~f ~tft~ Rock an_d to th?se of other Southern cities over whom the Mailed Fist of the Dtctator IS now poised and ready to strike. Meantin;e, unless in t_he unlikely event of an emergency session of Co~gres~ bemJ? called to Impeach the nine arrogant old Dictators now r~l.mg With. an Ir?~ rod from a marble mansion in Washington, the Krem­h~ s grandiOse VISIOns of American conquest are nearer to realization at th!s good hour than at any time since these treacherous barbarians first 1aid profai?e eyes on the greatest country in which a Bountiful Saviour ever perm.ltted. mortals to live and have their being. At th1s pomt perhaps we should humbly bow to the spirit of Thomas Jefferson a~d admit With shame that he was justified in his apprehension when he said: "We have a Republic if we can keep it." Since Little Rock, it looks as if we may not keep it, Octobo•, 1958 THE SOUTHERN CONSERVATIVE Paqe 3 State Party Conventions Have Degenerated IF AMERICANISM COULD ONLY Into Campaign Committees For Politicians BE GIVEN ONE MORE CHANCE! There is a definite school of difficulty in finding his way to the There is a very pronounced belief on the part of many Americans ~~~~gt~teinp~~~~~o~~!~s:;~~~h ~~~1~ ~:~~ro~r::sh~n~:o~~ u t instruction that the degeneracy, weakness and depravity of our State and National no influence in government and political leaders in this country is merely a part of the evil prevailing that political bosses have complete Another characteristic of State throughOut the world. control of party machinery. ~~i~~~n~~~s ~~J~~~o~!rth:c~:i~1~~ Any alert and observant Ameri- carried on by the same personaH­can who carefully watches the pro- ties, year after year, who seem to ceedings of a State Party Conven- make a career of the job. There tion is bound to concede that there may be less hair, fewer teeth and is some merit to this claim. bigger waistlines among them as Traditionally, the purpose of a ~~e rhe::: ~?st~rwbu~~:seesi~cn~~~:~ ~~=t~~;0on~=~~0~0~~tli~a~y p~i;~:~ ~! change. to insure that the members of that party in that particular State may voice their sentiments on le:tding Issues of the day and incorporate such sentiment in resolutions for the information and guidance of their State and Federal renrcsenta­tives in order that such public serv­ants may vote accordingly. Strictly speaking, members of the -t.Yvo Houses of Congress, since they are Federal officials, are not supposed to participate directly in State Conventions except as hum­ble spectators sincerely trying to find out what the voters of their State are thinking with a view to putting the wishes of their con::>ti­tuents into law, insofar as it is within their power to do so. It is almost as if they are com­missioned by Divine Providence to take charge and run the show at its biennial performances. They ap­pear to get a vicarious thrill from rubbing shoulders with high office­holders and associating on an inti­mate basis with Senators, Govern­ors, Congress~e.n and such .. This practice of perpetual stew­ardship over State Conventions by the same persons would not be so bad if these same individuals did not invariably let their personal adoration of shady politicians total­ly blind them to the best interests of the taxpayers who, under such arrangement, seldom get a break. Our observations herein have ref­erence to both political parties and But in this tradition-smashing we are not speaking of any particu­era, this time-honored procedure lar State. However, as an illustra­has been cast overboard. U.S. Sen- tion of how little representation the ators and Congressmen now swarm voters actually have in the behind­In and take over. They unabashedly the-scenes d~l~p~r~tipns. of. a ~t.ate tell officially elected delegates what Convention, we ,.d,i.g.~; & t9., U of to do, say and think and usually an incident connected with the wind up in stampeding the Conven- Texas State Democratic Conven­tion into action designed to further tion at San Antonio in SeptemOer. the political ambition of one or At a pre-Convention caucus held more of their own group. in Ft. Worth a few days earlier a The unhappy result is that State resolution waS passed severely con­Party Conventions no longer ex- demning Senator Lyndon Johnson press the will of the people of the for his part in defeating the bill various localities who fancy them- before the United Staes Senate to selves as part of the proceedings curb the Supreme Court in its ex­and who seriously select delegates ercise of illegal and usurped power with this end in view. Instead, the in beh~lf of Communists. This reso­average State Convention today is lution was passed by an almost stage-managed by a dozen or so three to one majority by the Fort smart boys, carefully directed and Worth caucus with the provision supervised by· a U.S. Senator and that it was to be submitted to the a Congressman or so, who fore- State Convention for ratification. ~ar~~=r th5eevre;:~luW~;;,5s, i~el:~tv~~~: th~~·st~::~~nst~e~~; e~~~~!c"tihc:~i~~ vention officials, censor the sub- ture with the result that this offi­jects for admission to the agenda cially-passed resolution "got lost'' and perfect the performance gen- and never showed up at San An- ~~a~~· ~~~~sa sa a S~~~~t~i~~~~r P;~; tonio. Instead a resolution was sub­presentation to the viewing public. f~~~~~~d b;'n~he ~~~:~tece~~o~~~~~ Of course where a State has a Johnson as a candidate for Presi­strong Governor this does not hap- dent of the United States which pen. In that case a Sta~e Conven- - was gavelled through the conven­tion is a State ConventlOn and no tion amid boos and hisses. Federal interference is tolerated. It is a deliberative body in which This was the "will of the people the will of the majority prevails of Texas" yet! and truly expresses the sentiment, as nearly as humanly possible, of the varied interests of the State and especially takes cognizance of any referendum vote of the people on controversial issues which may be paramount in that particular State. Also the resolutions reflect~ ing the conclusions of the Conven­tion are not written three days in advance. But, unfortunately, strong Gov­ernors are not a drug on the market at the present time and, outside of a handful of Chief Executives in the Old South (and Arkansas) the average current head of a State has And although Texans generally love the members of the Supreme Court about like they do Krushchev and although in a referendum they voted against integration of their schools by a majority of almost four to one, this same Committee on Resolutions and Platform turn­ed down a resolutiqn condemning the Court and demanding State autonomy in the management of Texas schools. Fortunately, how­ever, a determined and unintimi­dated Fort Worth delegate brought the resolution out on a minority report and w:1cn it got to the floor of the Convention it was approved They claim that there is a general breakdown of private and political morals in all sectors of the earth and that this deadl)' virus must run its course before our suffering nation recovers from the horrible sickness that afflicts it. We do not accept this view. We do not concede that our great Republic should succumb to the contagion that is sweeping the world and we would not have done so if we had not so closely associated our government and its policies with those of alien lands whose Socialistic objectives, aims and ideals are so far beneath our own. Ther~'s an old saying that you can't lie down with dogs and not get up w1th fleas and, ideologically speaking, we have lain down with every mongrel cur nation on the face of the earth and from them we have contracted not only fleas but lice, mange and dry rot. But the loyalty, the courage and the patriotism o( the average ~o~:.rican citizen is intact; it is only our leadership that is rotten to the We even dare to claim that if, by a miracle, a man should be nomi­nated for President in 1960 who based his campaign on a demand for such American principles as the return of States Rights, the immediate cessation of all foreign aid and the return of our troops from foreign countries; withdrawal from the United Nations, balancing the bud:1et, reduction of the national debt, removal of the Federal government from competition with private business, repeal of the Sixteenth Amendment and of all Socialistic legislation now on the statute books - he would sweep the country. We cannot afford to mark off rank and file American people yet as spineless morons until they have had a chance to do something they have not been permitted to do for twenty-five years and that is to vote for a man whose dedication to the Constitution is unchallenged and who will not later cotlaborate with those who would sacrifice American sove­reignty and set\ us into One-\Vorld Government. Comm.uni~~ ·Is Winning Fast In The U.S. Says Foreign Correspondent Edward Hunter is a foreign cor­respondent, author, editor, world traveller and specialist in propa­ganda warfare. He told the Com­mittee on Un-American Activities of the House of Representatives in Washington that Communist psy­chological warfare is now winning such extensive victories in the United States that they will not have to employ military force against us. Mr. Hunter, Who has spent more than thirty years in countries un­der various forms of Communist pressure, said: "It should be obvious to anyone who has observed the cold war that the United States is its principal target. We need only to read what the Communists themselves say but we refuse to do so exactly as we could not believe that Hitler meant what he said in Mein Kampf. "The first battles in this total war have been won by the forces of International Communism in the United States. These victories are identical to those they have won in every country which they have ultimately taken over." by a thunderous ovation. Maybe the "straw bases" are a necessary evil as claimed but some of us simple-minded citizens still believe that in a case of th is kind, those duly appointed delegates who write and get adopted a resolution for consideration by the State Con­vention, arc entitled to get some­thing more out of it than a little exercise for the muscles of their right arm. Mr. Hunter declared that in the struggle with the Soviet Union "we are losing so fast that unless we put a very drastic end to it, the question of who is winning will b~ academic in a decade." "I am not afraid of Communists alone," Mr. Hunter continued. "Communists have never been able to achieve anything without a front. The Communism that wins is always the Communism that makes the non-Communist its ally; by non-Communists I do not neces­sarily mean fe llow travellers. I mean non-Communists who allow themselves to be trapped by Com­munist strategy". The American people should un­derstand what Mr. Hunter is talk­ing about as they have seen "Com­munist strategy" corrupt the Su­preme Court of the United States, the ministry, educational institu­tions, the legislative and executive branches of government and indi­viduals in all walks of life as well as the almost total undermining of the American form of government. As a result of recent Supreme Court decisions, 49 hard-core Com­munists who were convicted under the Smith Act for teaching the overthrow of the American g0v~ ernment, have been set free to continue their teaching concerning the overthrow of the American government? How long would Russia tolerate those teaching the overthrow of the Kremlin? Just long enough to load their machine guns, that's how long. The Southern Conservative A MONTHLY PUBLICATION OF EDITORIAL OPINION WITH NATIONAL CIRCULATION IDA M. DARDEN, EdHor Editorial Officei Flatiron Bu ildinq Fort Worth, Texas Phone EO 2-2089 Price $5.00 Per Year !Ev•ry pf:id 1ubtcriber is entitled to one free sub~cr1pl1on to be unt to •ny pltton ofhitehootinq.) Sent without cod to membeu of Conqreu, members of St•l• legit l o~~turu, Governou, endotherpublieoffieie ft. A help less sparrow can drift with the wind but it takes an eagle to fly against the storm. THE TENTH AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES, The powen not delegated to the United St•tu by the Corutitution, nor prohibited by it to the Stefet ,,., ruerved to the st.tetrespeetively,ortothepeople. Nation Suffers Loss In Death of Texas Patriot Advocates of Constitutional Gov· ernment in Texas and the nation suffered a lethal blow in the recent death of the Honorable E. M. Big­gers of Houston who was killed in an automobile accident near his country home in East Texas. Mr. Biggers had been on the fir· ing line for good government since the first day Roosevelt came to office and the disintegration of the American Constitution set in like a repulsive and deadly disease, and which has continued to this good hour. In discussing fundamental issues, and broadcasting his views through every medium of communication avai lable to him, Mr. Biggers never muffed a li ne, pulled his punches nor failed to score a hull's eye in his forthright and honest criticism of the forces which are out to de· stray the Republic he loved. The forces of decency and ranks of patriotism in the United States were seriously depleted by the re· moval of E. M. Biggers from the earthly s_ce_ne_. ____ _ Leo W. o·Brien , a New York CongresS'man who helped to pilot the Alaska statehood bill through the House, is out after more worlds to conquer. Not only is he plugging for the admission of Communist­dominated Hawaii into the Union but has got himself appointed head of a House Committee to in­t> estigate the possibility of bringing Puerto Rico in, too. He admits that Puerto Ricans don·t want State· hood but blandly 1·emarks: "Puer­to Rico, whether it likes it or not, is in the Statehood picture." That's right, brother. If they don't want to come in,_ go out there and drag 'em in by the hair of the head. Who cares what the people want, any u;ny? THE SO U THERN CON SERV AT I VE Our Random State Political Impressions Of A Convention Whatever happened to the old-time State Democratic Conve n t~o n where great issues were t hreshed out on the floor of the C ~:mve n _h o n and it ViaS well worth the long t rip just to li sten to profound d1scuss1ons on both sides of the subject ~rapier-sh ar p mi nds? The t rouble with far too many Conservatives is that they are con­servative until it comes to a show-down a-nd then they fall for propa­ganda like a two-ton hippopotamus sliding off the bank of a sleepy lagoon. All the plotting and planning at a State party conclave is done in a hotel room and rank and file delegates from the grass roots merely provide the window-dressing. They a lso come in handy when it's time to vote approval of something that has been done without their knowledge or consent, and of which the folks back home probably don't approve. -o-o--o- It's a long hot wait in a stuffy auditorium until the big boys come out of seclllsion and tell the sweating delegates what they - the sweat· ing delegates - have decided. - o-o-o- Great stress is always laid on the need for "unity" by the bosses who feel that anything "controversial" is to be avoided like the leprosy or the seven-year itch. But some of us nit-wits keep remembering that "controversy" is also avoided in the Kremlin and that "unity" is main· tained there even if it takes a shot in the back of the head or exile to Siberia to insure it. What line of reasoning do so-called Conservatives pursue, we sit and wonder, which enables them to give one United States Senator a pat on the back and the other one the boot - when the vote of both is practically identical on leading issues which come before the Senate? Perhaps after all, we finally decide, a State Convention is not actually a medium for recording the will of the voters but a contest to develop the relative strenglh of the State's two members of the Upper House of Congress. Where did district J?Olitical bosses -g:et the idea that they are minia­ture king-makers or poll tical strategiSts or that their "vieWs are sounder or more representative of the people than those of plain John Jones of Polecat Gulch? Why does hope spring eternal in the hearts of some of us simple sou ls that some day the people wi ll rise up. throw out crooked politicians and assert their own supreme sovereignty? -o-o--o- Are political climbers who consider that alignment with the "right people" is more important than pr inciple, a product of that same inherent weakness in human nature which gave us that pitiable specimen known as a social climber? In the final analysis, why go to the trouble and expense of holding a State Convention anyway? Why not just let a few local bosses, a United States Senator and a Congressman, or two get. together and de­cide what the people want? It would not only be more economical from a financia l standpoint but would also save wear and tear on the dele· gates' feet. It Will Take More Than Adams' Resignat ion To Clean Up GOP Sherman Adams, the cold·blood- will mean little in lessening the ed and tight-lipped martinet from odor of corruption permeating ttre New Hampshire who demanded administration and that only whole­probity and impeccable conduct sale resignations would restore the of his associates, but apparently not GOP to its former status as a pow­of himself, has gone from the White erful and responsible unit of Amer- House. ican politics. Ca~didates for bo~h Hou~es of Like the equally perverted Demo- Congt es~ and potential candidates cratic Party, it is heavily clogged for ~restd~nt on t.he Modern Re· with International Sac i ali s t s publican t1c~et ObJ~Cted. so _stren· who direct its policies. In their de­uol! sly to h1s. con~mua~IOn m the te rmination to out·do the New office of Pres!dentl,al aide that he Dealers and Fair Dealers, Modern ~ad to go. It was.n t that they ob- Republicans have robbed the tax­jected to Adams . alleged accept- payers and squandered their money ance <?f valuable gifts from Bernard on a far greater scale than did their &~lrd f~~=f ~~e~~~~::, aw~~~e~~~= immediate predecessors. about their own defeat which in· Only a thorough cleansing of spired the widespread demand that both major parties and the elimi· he step down and out. nation of t~e subversive leadership However, we greatly fear that in each wil l avert the tragic fate this sacrifice play by the New which so menacingly threatens the Hampshire member of the "team" American Republic. October, 1951 School Boards Are A Prime Target In Red Conspiracy A good place to ha lt creeping Socialism in th is country is in the election of the school boards in local com!'hu nities, and too much care cannot be exerted in the se~ lection of these importa nt officials. A check of the s ituation would prove that there are three conserv­ative members and four Liberals or Reds on the average board. Com· munist influence is prevalent in practically all school board elec· tions throughout the United States and especially in those of the major cities of the country. The advantage of this, from the standpoint of the Reds, is that it is possil5le for Communist text books to be approved by Boards with a "liberal" ma.iority to say nothing of acceptance of "free food" from the Federal government for school lunch rooms and other concessions which promote little by little, the centralization of au· thority in Washington. Good Americans will not forget that Com m u n is t conspirators against this country are active on all fronts including, and perhaps especially, in the selection of those who run the nalion's schools. The point is that Federalization of the schools and all other Amer­ican institutions and the concentra· tion of power in V/ashington as a central agency, will make it easier for the Soviets to take over this country which is, of course, their over-all objective. Only Political Cowards Will Sign This Pledge One of the most obvious frauds ever perpetrated is the Fair Cam· paign Committee, Inc., which seeks to secure promises from candidates for office that such candidates will conduct their campaign ''in the best American tradition" and that they will "condemn vilification, misrepresentation and dishonest and unethical practices." "The catcl} is the pledge contain· ing a condemnation of "appeals based on race, creed or national origin." It doesn't require a very bright mind to figure out who framed that gimmick or what its purpose is. Mongrelizers, and their Commu· nist sponsors, don't want the mis· erable subject of integration dis· cussed and would like to apply the gag rule to all those aspiring to public office. Any candidate who signs such a pledge is a political coward and not worthy to hold any office within the gift of the American peop~ It seems that nobody is safe anywhere a.n11 mol'e and accidents can happen which have nothi11g to do with trains, automobiles, pranes, fire or flood. At Dallas a zoo ctt­tendant was stooping ove1· in the couTse of his w01-lc when two hnge gorillas playfu.Lly leaped on his bac1c, pinned him to the floor and sent him to the hospital with ser­ious injuries. As one who is acci­dent ·prone we are going to be careful. Having two gorillas leap on our back i.li one thing which has not happened to us so far. Oclob.,, 1958 TH E SOU THERN CO NS ERVAT IVE Paqe S Extra! Extra! Federal Judge Shows Respect For Constitution J udge T. Whit fie ld Davidson of Dallas is one member of the Federal judicia ry who has had the courage to dissent from his contemporaries who have been rendering decisions in keeping with the view that the farms of this nation must be oper­ated by Washington politicians. For t his he deserves the gratitude of all Americans who believe in Consti­t utional Government. I When Communists Bow Their Necks They Accomplish _Their Objective In the case of the U.S. vs. J. Evetts Haley, Jr. , in which the lat­ter was charged with the heinous crime of planting crops on his own la nd to feed to his own livestock, Judge Davidson deviated from the rulings of midget-brained jurists throughout the coun~ry who have been following the Kremlin-inspir­ed philosophy laid down in \Vash­ington to the effect that American farmers are slaves who may plant a nd reap only such crops and in such amount as Federal bosses specify. "There is no Constitutional amendment," said Judge Davidson jn handing down his decision in favor of Haley, "authorizing Con­gress to tell the farmer what to pla nt , what to eat, what to do or how to work". tn these few te rse words em­bodying the American credo, Judge David son has laid down the basis for legislation in the next session of Congress to repeal the disgrace­ful farm ·policy now in effect which makes serfs of the men whO raise the nation's agricultural products for the feeding of man and beast. It is vital to the preservation of freedom in this country - or ra­ther to its restoration - that Amer­ican voters communicate with their publ ic servants in Congress and tell those wind-jamming four-flushers in no uncertain terms that the God­given rights of the men who till the soi l must be restored and that this must be the ficst order of business when they return to Washington in ~nuary_. ------- In a long editorial on school in- 1eg1·ation, the lndianapolis Star in­cluded a1·guments which make good sense: " . . . More and more Ame1·icans a1·e coming to realize that the matter of school desegre· gation is not a simple question of handing down court decrees or passing ideahstic laws. This is coming a bout as more and moTe Americans are brought into per­sonal contact with the realities of the race problem as it exists all over the United States, as well as -in the South .. . The Courts in the South which have delayed deseg­regation are dealing in the prac­tical facts which bear on the local cases brought before them. They are not indulging in psychological meanderings or sociological fan­tnsies of the t·ype which marked the o1·igirwl Supreme Court school decision. Instead, these Courts are concerned with the facts regard­ing the schools which are under their ju1·isdiction, and the prac­tical results which are likely to be achieved from the enforcement of their orde1·s .. • " Supreme Court Justice Admits Unethical Judicial Behavior Foreign-born Felix Frankfurter, Supreme Court Justice for many years and regarded by many as a World Revolution ist, made an ad­mission through the press recently which indicates that ethics, as well as respect for the Constitution, no longer figure in the actions of the members of that body. session of information showing that he had served for more than ten years as adviser to the NAACP be­fore his appointment as a Supreme Court Justice, and rem inded him that he had, s ince becoming a mem­ber of the Court, written decisions favorable to the NAACP. Frankfurter admitted his fo rmer connection with the NAACP but expressed no shame or regret over the fact that he had participated in the infamous Black Monday de­cision in which his former cl ients were the beneficiaries. The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People which is genera lly recogn ized as having strong influence with the nation's highest court, was one of the i_nstigators of the integration ~~~is~~i:hani~e~~~~~n~~gt~~ ~~~;! Such judicial misbehavior as th is ~~~tf1~blic schools throughout the ~~~~phe~~~~~~~gah~d a~eo~~~~~~~~ the Bench in the days before Con· The New Bedford, Massachu- stitutional Government was abol­setts, Standard -Times advised ished. Now it is accepted without Frankfurter that they_ w_ e_re_ i_n -p'-o_s- _q:u_e_stio_n_and_l_au~gh;e_d ..o:..r_r. ___ White And Negro Students Was This Red A Poet Engage In Chicago Riot O A 'P h ? That segment of the nation's r rop et' • press which either ignores or plays Langston Hughes is a Negro and down racial st ri fe which is con- a_ so-called poet, who joined prac- :~~~~rs ~::k~:;c;:\~n t~~~e~r:t~~: ~~~~K w:~e~rgan~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~! of the race riof-"a't' a ~hkago South... ago. ' Side high school re~ently. Hughes' ' writing.S ·have frequent- Even the Associated Press, whose representatives Jove to write abou t " integra tion without incident" and who spread the myth that only the South objects to the mixing of races in schools, had to take cognizance of the Chicago rioting. The brawl between White and Negro students at the school reached such proportions that sev­eral squads of police had to be called out to augment the force which is constantly kept at most schools which Communist in flu­ence has succeeded in integrating. Between four and five hundred pupils took part in the free-for-all fight which was carried on with broken bottles, tire chains and switchblade knives. Police detail reported that no one knew what started the riot and that is probably correct. It is not any one thing which starts such clashes but simply the natural an­tagonism which prevails, and will continue to prevail, between the White and Negro races when they are ·forced to associate in close proximity against the best instincts of both races. ly been recommended reading for their members by church groups for some reason which is beyond hu­man unders tandi ng. In sworn test imony before the House Un-American Activities Committee on December 9, 1938, the following "poem" of Hughes was produced for the record: "Put one more S in the U. S. A. To make it Soviet. The U. S. A. when we take con­trol Will be U. S. S. A. then." "Good Morning, Revolution: You're the best friend I ever had. We gonna' pal around together from now on!" Front the day when t.he Com­munist murdere1·s were t·ecognized by this and other countries and accepted as a decent nation, they have been the rotten apple in the barrel. Instead of acquh'ing re· spectability by association they have contaminated every nation in the world with the possible ex­ception of South K01·ea, Nationalist China and Spain. "I have been warned by many Hawaii's Communists Not i~"~."~of;'i~P~7e;:.~~~rS:,iz~v~;;nit Needed In United States down upon my head ruthless retal- Hawaii's governor, William F. iation- that efforts will be made Quinn of Honolulu, was in San to destroy public faith in the in- Francisco recently to attend the tegrity of tny views-not by force Paci fic Festival and, incidentally, of just m·gument but by the appli- to disseminate the usual propagan­cation of the false melhods of da about the need for Hawaii to be fr:!:t~~j~fz~~- bii!~~:otl~; \~:A~~-~ iJ~i~~-in as a State of the American keep silent-or take the conse- In the opinion of thoughtful quences."-General Douglas Mac- ·Americans there are already some­Arthur in a speech ia Boston on thing like a million active working J uly 25, 1951. non card-carrying Communists in As we have often observed, the Communists never give up once they set out to accomplish an ob­jective and thi~ is being forceful ly demonstrated 10 the case of Lillie Rock. It matters not that the people of that city are overwhelmingly a_nd unalterably opposed to integra­tiOn of the races in their schools· ~a_t they voted by a heavy rna: JOnty for the election of Governor Faubus to an unprecedented third term and that they will close their s?hools before permitting integra­tlO~- The Reds go right ahead in their determination to achieve in­tegration anyway. This determination was illustrat .. ed in action by the school boa rd there, after the Governor had a p- ~ proved a Corporation to operate the schools on a private bas is. The Board_ appealed to a Federal Judge knowmg full well that his ruling woul~ be opposed to the setting up of pnvate educational institutions even though it is the law of Ar· kansas to thus proceed. Then there was the action of a bunch of Little Rock lawyers who came out with unasked advice about the Constitutionality of the law which authorizes the closing of the schools. Following that there was a demonstration by 65 young Reds among the students who demanded the opening of the schools on an integrated basis. This was followed by a demand on the part of two mothers of s tudents posing. as segrega tionists who "only wanted to open the schools'" even if they had to accept integra· tion. They were, of course, not seg· regationists or they would be per· fectly wi lling for the schools to re· main closed forever rather than have their children attend classes with Negroes. On top of all this, there were the slanted and biased newspaper ar· tides by brainwashed reporters who worked overtime to present the case of integrationists in the best possible light and enlist the nation's sympathy for the poor downtrodden Negro "children" who were being deprived of an educa· tion because the White high school was closed to them, but never men· tioning that they had a mill ion dol· lar high school of their own. And so it is that behind-the· scenes the Communists work the cl?c_k around through their dupes, wtlhng or otherwise, and there is no angle that they won't explore until they have finally put into ef­fect the Kremlin's program of ra· cia! mongrelization. uif a white person had stabbed Martin Luther King in New Yo1·k, he would be cut, drawn and quart­ered by now," says R. E. Witliams of Lubbock in the Dallas NewS. "But since it was one Negro who stabbed another, Governor Harri­man simply rushed to the hospital to hold King's hand." the United States seeking, ei ther wittingly or inadvertent ly, the over­throw of our form of government and Harry Bridges' Hawaiian Com- ~~~:~tj~s~~t~~tt~e~t~~t j~e d~~~~· Pogo 6 THE SOUTHERN CON SERVATIVE October, 1958 Senator William E. Jenner's Farewell · Address to the United States Senate (Edi tor's Note: We bel ieve that every true American who has a l ~ ready read, or who reads for the first time below, the final remarks of the Honorable William E. Jenner to the lawmaking body he has served so ably, will feel an overpowering impulse to d rop to their k nees and pray for the type of leadership in the Executive branch of government which a contemplation of this great document permits them to envision. It is also our earnest hope that a sufficient num­ber of red-blooded Americans may grasp the implications therein while it may yet be possible to reclaim the Republic rather than waiting to sorrowfully digest its meaning from the lonely and for­lorn vantage point of a Concentration Camp.) my years spent in the Senate of the un :~ed States-nearly a third of a man's professional life-leave a mark which 10~ h i n g will ever erase. I am p;·oud to have been chosen by my State of Indiana, to serve in the United States Senate. I have made many happy associations here, and I hope they will not fade away. Thou;Jh r am sorry to leave, I am happy to return to the life of a private citizen, No people anywhere in our country care moreforhomeand family, forprivatelife andourlocalcommunitiesthanthepeople of Indiana. We havesomethingofthefee\ing that our local communities are the hub of the universe, which was so strong among Americans in colonial and pioneer days. It is nearly 14 years since the day in November 1944, when I first took the oath of office in this Chamber, Those 14 years have been among the most critical in the history of the United States. As I plan to depart, I ask myself, what does it all mean? What is happening to my country? When I came to the Senate in 1944, the armies of the Allies had broken through the German West Wall and freed France from the enemy. The end was in sight. In the Paciric the Navy had begun the destruction or Japanese sea power. Mac­Arthur and his men had started on the bloody island road to Tokyo. Our country was the head and shield of the grand alliance. Wenotonlyhad 12 million men under arms, in every theater of the war, but we were the arsenal for all the Allied Nations. Our farms and factories poured out rivers of goods for war. Our railroads carried them across the continent. Our ships and the ships of the Allies braved the submarine-infested waters about England, the Arctic Coast of Rus­sia, Africa and Latin America. Our set thatAmerica?Whathashappened to our courage, our clear direction and purpose, our proper pride in our acComplishments and sense of restraint in using the power that was given us? The glory has departed. We no longer have a sense of elation. \Ve are confused, operating at cross-purposes. We refuse to face the harsh realities of the world we live in, and instead fal! backoninoralisticplatitudestohidethe emptiness of our minds, I keep asking myself why. I do not have a cl ear answer. But, at least, I have tried to free my mind of cant, to strip it bare of the platitudes which are in style today. I am willing to face the emptiness of things, because I believe that only after we have cleansed our minds of lies can new seeds begin to grow, in the little clearings where the weeds of self-decep­t ion have beenLcut down Only if we have the courage to li ve with the winter of our disillusionment, \viii we see, once again, a spring of new ideas and hope rise from {he store left by our Founding Fathers. I am not going to retrace the struggle which has gone on in Congress and -the executive branch since 1944. The point is that we have been en­gagedinafargreatersti- uggle,against a far more powerful force, than con­sumed our full powers in the war against the axis. Wearefightingagainstatidalwaveof collectivism, coming out of Eastern Eu­rope, which, if it is not stopped, will de­stroy all western civilization and the Christian faith on which it is based. Jt must be stopped, though we do not yet see on what battlefront the pre£,ent­day Huns will be halted. You recall the story of Jacob wrestling with the angel. Jacob struggled long and hard, in the darkness, with an opponent hecouldnotsee.Hewassurehisstrength would fail, but he fought on. With the breaking of the day, Jacob knew he had been wrestling with superhuman power, but the angel told him he had the bless­ing of God and would prevail. The Communist challenge may yet prove the goad which compels us to rise out of our sloth and security, to face the dangers of the world we live in. In many ways Congress has been the of frontline of this struggle for the soul of America. we pcr ior power to other people. We expected nothing from our sacri­ficcsexceptlibertyforallnations, and the peace that goes with freedom. Tha t year of 1941 was a truly great year in the record of our country. !\1r. President, what has happened to We know of the determined efforts by alittlegroupofwillfulmentoperpetuate in the war and postwar years the unre­strained executive power they had built upduringtheNewDealperiodandWorld Warn. Let me say here that I am not speaking as a Republican. I am not making a de­fense of my party, and I am not making any partisan criticism of the Democratic Party. My only concern is with the question: What is happening to our country? As I have said repeatedly, the New Deal had no common inte rests with the Dem­ocratic Party. New deal ism is an importa· tion f rom countries where the executive power was always domi nant, or where rising left-wing factions, inexperienced in politics, yielded to the childish hope that, it governments were made strong, they would use their power to serve the interests-of the people. I said to members ot my own party in 1953 lhat the New Dealers were interes t­ed only in the party in power. I said they would make the same ef­forts to capture the Republican Party in 1953 that they made to take over the Democratic Party in 1933. I leave the rest to my colleagues. Let us go back to November 194-1. Most Americans saw only the grand coalition with its huge armies and navies and air armadas pressing forward to victory The Atlantic Charter promised a just peace. But little groups of men were al­ready hard at work, to make over our Government, on the anvil of war, in their own image. We know how the Atlantic Charter was replaced by the agreements of the Big Three at Teheran, Yalta, and Potsdam. We know how carefully thought out plans for military government or Ger­many and Austria were replaced by the Morganthau plan for making Germany a pastureland and sending her scientists and other!t t o slav,e. J.p.bpr in Russia. We know how the trained diploma ts who understood the Far East were re­placed by John Carter Vincent and Lach­lin Currie, Owen Lattimore, and E. C. Carter, with their precise plans for the softening up of Free China, and the aban­donment ot Asia to the Communists. We know how American economic Ideas or free enterprise in foreign trade were replaced by GATI and other parts of the blueprint for one economic world. We know how our policy was directed to let Korea fall, without Jetting it look as if we pushed her. Our valiant fighting men in Korea resisted and defeated the screaming hordes of Red China. We know how the victory was taken away from us, in the dark recesses of collaboration between our State Department a nd the United Nations. We know how the Republican Party was gradually shifted from the leadership of Ken Wherry, Robert Taft, Arthur Van­denberg, and the group of Senators who fought so bravely with them. We know how it was taken over by Paul Hoffman, andhiskind,themodernRepublicans,and the men in the shadows behind them. We know how the Democratic Party was transformed from a party which ac­cepted Franklin Roosevelt's temporary re­forms, but still was committed to the Constitution, into a party managed by Harry Hopkins, Dean Acheson, Walter Reuther, a:-~d the men in the shadows be­hind him. We know how brilliantly Congress brought out the facts about the Com­munist influence on our Government's policies. The House of Representativ,es supported, through every kind of pres­sure and abuse, the Committee on Un­American Activities. The Senate support­ed the Subcommittee on Internal Secur­ity, under Senator McCarran, Senator Eastland, and myself, The evidence brought out by those committees and other committees of Congress document­ed large areas of the Communist con­spiracy within our Government. We know the pressure which set in. to destroy these committees and to besmirch. the evidence the Congress had ga thered, and, even, to attack the legislative power itself. Many brave a nd disti nguished Mem~ bers or Congress were retired to private life, because they incurred the anger of the Communists, who relentlessly pursue any one who dares oppose them, until t he day he dies. There is a long line of such brave, defeated, forgotten men, up to the day of infamy when Joe McCarthy was censured by his own colleagues in the Senate because someone in high office did not want him to get nearer to the secret places where Communists had power over our Armed Forces. Whilethisstrugglewasgoingon in our country, the Soviet rulers were busy ex­panding the empire of death over half the world of living men We remember that, even while our fly­ers were piloting planes over Canada to Alaska, and our seamen were going down to death in the icy waters near Mur­mansk, the Soviet Union had its spy net­work in Japan, under Richard Sorge, urging the Japanese to attack America, instead of Siberia. When Japanese planes rained death out of the morning sky on Pearl Harbor, the Soviet Union knew Siberia was safe. It moved its Asian forces to the European front. Let every American who praises the Russian defense of Moscow remember that the Russian victory was poss ible only because our loyal ally, the Soviet Union, had persuaded the Japanese to attack our country. The Soviet Union, in 1944, was so weak that it bar'ely survived the conflict with Hitler. 1t survived only because America sent the extra margin of food and planes and trucks which kept the Russian am1ies in the field. How did the Soviet Union repay our help, when the victory was won? Just exactly as they had said they would re~ pay it. Lenin had long taught the Com­munists that they must usc every nat ion· alistwartostarttheworld civil war. As soon as the Communists were sure we would defeat the Nazis, Soviet political leade rs started their intrigues to destroy Chiang Kai-shek and cor{quer China. They intended that America would have no f riends and no bases between Outer Mongol ia and the coast of California They lit the fires of civil war in Korea and southeast Asia, stirred up civ il com­motion in Germany, Italy, Austria, France and Engl and, t rained their subversive fol­lowers in India, Africa, and Latin Amer~ ica, and brilliantly directed their trai­torous fifth column and its dupes in America. Now half the world is under the heel of their armies. A large part of the so­called Free World is so confused by their intrigues, so fea rful of their vengeance, that it cannot plan a counterattack. All over the world the simple people know the score. They know Communism is death. They will try to escape so long as they can. All over the earth they are leaving the Communist world for the Free World-voting, if you please, with their feet. Our Government tells us Tito is a great championoffreedom;buttheplainpcople of Yugoslavia do not understand. Every day they arc walking their way to free~ dom, In Germany, all the human traffic is one-way-from Communist Germany tG ({:ontinucd on Page 7) Oclobe•, 1958 JENNER'S (Continued from Page 6) Free Germany. We remember the pictures of the Korean refugees clinging by the hundreds to every cart and truck that left the land of Syngman Rhee. They are still coming. Farther south, the Chinese flee in jUnks from the mainland to Taiwan; yet we are asked to believe the armed forces of China, with the best modern equipment, could never return from Taiwan to the mainland. Politically, the world is covered with a blanket of silence. There is not much debate or argument. There is only the stillness, and the soft sound of feet cross­ing the borders to freedom, or junks sail­ing in the winds to the land of hope. Our people have not failed. Our prin­ciples have not been found wanting. Our political leaders have failed. The people havecourage,andtheinstinctfortruth. They know the greatest political earth· quakeinhistoryhasdestroyedallland­marks. They are wi11ing to work and to suffer. They ask of their leaders only that they be given new maps, so they can find their way over the new territory, through which, like the children of Israel, they must journey if they are to reach the promised land. Our times call for soul-searching by both our political parties. In a crisis as. deep and as wide as that of today, politi­cal leaders cannot do everything. But have they done enough? ltisthetaskofpoliticalparties,under the two-party system, to mediate among the many special interests, but to find answers that serve the common good. Today. that task is, I admit. harder than it has ever been before. America is sick with a sickness that goes very deep. The sickness has spread into our schOOls, our industries, our unions, even our churches. But that is no excuse for failureofthepoliticalpartiestodotheir own work. The duty of our parties is to serve the one great political interest in our coun­try, the interest of those Americans who ask no gifts from their country, who be­lieve- with Cleveland-that the govern­ment does not support the people. The people support their government. Have our -political leaders read Plato and Aristotle and learned how old is the trick of buying the support of the people with their own money? Have they worked :hard enough to see that those who prom­ise a brave new world in our day are no different from the demagogs of Athens and Rome? Have they learned to read, in the high-minded pronouncements about peace, collective security, and a new day for. the common man, the same lies and deception that have destroyed so many republics? Do they know, but fear for their own little safety? It is the duty of political leaders to lead the Nation to clear political thinking. They must tell the people where, in the Jies and confusion, their vital interests will be found. Behind ali the fooling and the horse­play, the partisan argument, and appeals to emotion, the great American parties have served our Nation well. I hope they will again. But today the individual who is trying to understand the dangers to our country must stand alone, and do what Jittle he can, until the parties take up their burden again. This is no time for me to speak of what I have done, or tried to do, nlthough Jam trying, by this recounting, to find the answer for myself. Wherever I could, I have fought vigor· ously the Communist penetration into American Government and American life. The records of our subcommittee and other committees tell the story of how much we uncovered. Wherever I could find a means to THE SOUTHERN CONSERVATIVE weaken the communism influence on our soil, I have fought for it-in the immi· gration laws, in internal security legisla­tion, in the fight to give the States their sovereign right to legislate, except where itconflictswiththcnationalpurpose. The bill before the Senate on yesterday, which I first introduced, would take from the Supreme Court the power to hear appeals in areas where the Court has deliberately restrained Congress, the executive branch, our States, our school system, and our barexaminers,fromnecessaryandproper steps to guard our country against in­ternal communism. That bill is not before the Senate at this time; it was defeated only yesterday by a vote of 41 yeas to 49 nays. But I hope it has left its impressiOn. That fight is not over; it still will have to be won. In foreign affairs, I have opposed solemn agreements with men who frank· \y admit they regard all agreements as military feints to deceive the hated ene­my. I have opposed collective security andforeignaid,becausetheyarefailures, and the record shows it. They have not strengthened American security or brought peace andgoodwillto the world. Instead, we have exported jobs and have drained away the wealth of this country; and still the Communists go merrily on their way. It is just as stupid for us to fall into Communist boobytraps as it would have been for President Roosevelt and his ad· visers to talk peace with Hitler, join him in a world government for cotlective se­curity, and dist ribute billions of our earn­ings in foreign aid to keep the neu'tral nations from turning pro-Nazi. I have urged at every opportunity that we take the Communists at their word, and admit they are engaged in a civil war against the world. That means we should keep from •them everything which builds up their· warm:ikiilg power. We cannot feed their strength by trade, dip­lomaticrelations, summitconferences,un­challenged rulership of the satellites, and the most absurd folly of all-cultural ex­change with those who have reduced all culturetoobediencetothestate. I have fought against all steps leading to world government, by people afraid to make an honest appeal to Americans to abandon their Constitution. I have op­posed the perversion or the treaty power into an instrument for reducing our Gov­ernment to a p;ovince of a world state. I have opposed abandonment of the con­stitutional rights of our fighting men through status of forces treaties and agreements. I have fought all the many­prOn6cd attempts to transform American fighting forces into police contingents, subject to control by the Security Coun· cil of the United Nations, where they would no longer be able . to safeguard our country or obey our Constitution. Finally, I have fought, wherever I saw a chance, against the weakening of America through financial waste, Gov­ernment extravagance, red-ink budgets, the lies about owing our debt to our­selves and the widespread inflation throughout our whole economy which fol· lows fiscal dishonesty. Congress is kept in a sUte of perpetual confusion, goaded to such speed the Members cannot think. But if one looks carefully, there is no confusion. The prob­lems are really simple. If I had to reduce everything I have learned in the last 14 years to one sen­tence, I could sum it up in these words, "Please do not give our Government so much money." Easy money is the root of political cor­ruption. Rigid control of public money is the root of political morality and political creativeness. Corruptionofgovernmentsbytoomuch wealth is not a new problem, but a very old one. The founders of our country understood how essential it is to keep government close to poverty's edge. They put the control over expenditures into the hand of Congress for a simple reason. The Congress which appropriated the money would not have the spending ot it, and could not build up an empire of pressure groups. The executive, which could misuse public money, was not per­mitted to appropriate it, or lay taxes to collect it. If the New Dealers had not had too much easy money, they could never have set up emergency t~gencies and created the sprawling bureaucracy which de­voured the old-line Federal agencies. If the Government in wartime had not had too much money, it would never have been able to put teams of one-worlders into every field of Government, to pre~ pare the directives, to write the laws, and to make the propaganda for our postwar Tower of Babel. If the postwar agencies had not had far too much money, they would not have been able to make our executive branch so huge, that Congress cannot control it, so secret ~that neither Congress, the press, nor the people can find out what is going on. A government with too much money to spend destroys the society it governs, in two ways. A spending government cor­rupts the weak with the current equiva­lent of bread and circuses. Today we call them Federal aid and summit conferences. More important, a spending government must destroy the strong. No spending government ever gave up spending voluntarily. If it is threatened with loss of the money it loves, a spend­ing government will fight with every­thing it has to preserve its advantage. A goverrunent with billions of dollars to spend as it likes is a government with economic soldiers it can ·send out to make war on its own people. It must use mon_ey as a weapon to destroy the strong, whO want no de­pendence on government. Why should anyone be surprised when the obvious happens? I need only mention the income tax, Federal control of expenses of industry like advertising and depreciation, Federal control of income-tax exemptions and tax-exempt foundations. Why is it that the tax-exempt foundations are almost as a unit committed to the welfare state? Let us not be naive. The Members ot this body have seen the growing demand by the public for reduced spending, and lower taxes, which reached its peak last year. Senators re­member how angrily the public protested the Eisenhower budget for fiscal 1959. Yet we have seen this year the wildest spending debauch ever engaged in by any Congress. I have chosen those words de· Jiberately. Nothing in the New Deal, noth· ing in World War II, and nothing in the postwar years or Korea, is anything like as outrageous as was.the spending spree of1958. The administration had virtually achieved a balanced budget in 1957 and was trying to pay back part of the debt that now costs us $8 billion a year in interest alone. Where is the surplus now? Gone with the wind. The Secretary of the Treasury says we went into the red nearly $3 billion in the year just ended. The deficit will be perhaps $12 billion this year. We have thrown away the hope of a balanced budget for years to come. I think the estimates of our deficit will prove much too low. The inflationary spirit is like a fire. Once' started, it is hard to bring under control. What is the end? We know. It is an old, old story. Always the end has been foreseeable long before the crash. I will not repeat to you the story of inflation in Germany or France or any other country. But I say this-the finan­cial losses of inflation are ot the size of catastrophe. But they are not intoler­able. Pogo 1 The American people could stand the loss of every dollar of their accumulated capit.al, and start from the bottom, to rebu1ld all their wealth, as Germany did afterl945. My fear is this. The American people, like ~ther.people, cannot stand the moral detenorat10~, the intellectual decadence, that :he fhght to inflation brings. The ~en m Congress who pushed the Amer­~~ n economy over the brink, from finan­C18l responsibility to runaway inflation will have to answer for the destructio~ ?t everything political, economic, moral, mtellectual ~hat has made America strong Inflation m Germany was the start of Adolf Hitler's journey to the summit. In­flation in the French Revolution led to N~poleon Bonaparte. Inflation is political SUicide. I ha~e not said the American people are gomg to travel the primrose path of inflatio.n. I s.ay they are being pushed in that. ~1recelion by wild-eyed Socialists, ambitious intellectuals, power-seeking demagogs and hidden Communists. . I sa~ the issue is not over money. The ISSue IS over political sanity, the in- .._ tellect~~l honesty, the moral decency, and the m1htary vitality of the United States. I am not retiring from political life be­cause I am retiring from Washington. As I said recently, our country is not governed by officials in the Capitol. So long !!S America is true to itself, its strength will lie in the country, not in t~e. Capitol. Its political sovereignty will hem the people, not in the officials. Its intellectual energy will be widespread in all parts of the Nation, not eman;:~.ting in a cloud from Washington. Its spiritual strength will be in its families, its local communities, its local papers, its local schools and colleges, and symphony or­chestras and baseball sandlots. When­ever the American peop\e decide to Tise up and rebel against Gov:ernment that comes from their Capital City, they can end it forever. If the day should ever come when the centralists and power seekers succeed in draining the strength ot America to the Capital, I hope they will give up the sacred name of our country, and let it gather dust in the annals ot history in­stead of being perverted to serve men not worthy of our past Our time will be known as one of the :o~tt !~~a~:~ fi~~o~~ i;r:~li~i~~t~=~~:~: We do not know. But let us not forget that t?e years immediately preceding the .­Constitutional Convention of 1787 have gone down in history as the Critical Period. The men who struggled with the difficulties that followed the Revolution did not know what I 787 would bring. What Americans did once, they can do again. The men who assembled to form the Constitutional Convention, were deeply grounded in both history and the practical affairs of life. They did not try to impose on the New World an exact model of the England of Magna Carta or Simon de Montfort, or the Parliamentary war with the Stuart kings. As men of wisdom and true scholarship, they knew the only way to preserve for new generations the vir~ tues of the past is to understand both the deeper significance of history, and the challenge of formless new experience. We have inherited in our Constitution and-our political system something great­erthan that document itself, magnificent as it is. We have inherited something of the greatness of mind of the men who made our Nation. They were faced with heavy burdens, but they took from the confusions and currents of their day the best that men had learned from the past and crossed it with their clear un­derstanding ot the universe opening be- .,.. fore us, in which we move step by step into the new world of time. It is my hope that the people of our (Continued on PageS) P•g• I "··And The Greatest Of These Is Circuity" We believe that everyone who is able should give what they can af­ford to organized charity drives of t heir respective cities because man's responsibility to his brothers in need is clearly outlined in the Bible. We confess, however, that we have no sympathy with the bally­hoo and theatrical atmosphere which the directors of such drives see fit to put on. Such projects ..... have now become big business and it is not unusual for Community Chests to ask for millions of dol­lars. Also there are "kick-off" ban­quets, parades with movie stars, brass bands and performing clowns to publicize the organized charity drive of th~ average city. _ Time was in pre-social security · days when charity was adminis­tered quietly and without fanfare In order to save the pride and dig­nity of the recipient. And donors of funds did not hold a banquet to emphasize to the world how big­hearted and generous they were toward their less fortunate fellow­men. Learning or a neighbor's need, they quietly slipped in under cover of darkness and left groceries and other necessary supplies on the back porch but under no considera­tion would they have insulted an ind igent person by making this ges­ture in public. However, as we are constantly remembering, times have changed, poverty is exalted and the posses­sion of wealth is sneered at and there is no shame attached to the giving of alms since our govern­ment has made it a national policy. Also recipients of charity are not timid about demanding their full share of the proceeds and if they feel that they have been short­changed, their screams of protest can be heard for miles. JENNER- (Con tinued from Page 7) generation will meet the difficulties of this period of confusion and chaos with the same fiery spirit of our forefathe rs. I hope and believe they will recreate the spiritual life of our country, for new generations, as the voyagers from old Europe recreated the spiritual, intellec­tual and political achievements of the OldWorldinthevirginlandsofAmerica. To leave the Senate is not to abandon the fight. Those who have been once Invo lved in this conflict will never be able to turn away again until the fight Is won. I close with the words John Adams wrote to his wife Abigail, the day after the signing of the Declaration of Inde­pendence. You will think me transported with enthusiasm, but I am not. I am well aware of the toil and blood and treas­ure it will cost ·uS to maintain this Declaration, and support and defend these States. · yet through all the gloom I can see the rays of ravish· THE SOUTHERN CONSERVATIVE ••THA R· s GOLD IN THEM THAR ·HILLs ·· It has long been a deep and impenetrable mystery to normal Amer­icans why a government which penalizes a farmer for raising one bushel of surplus whea t should encourage a surplus of illegitimate children by paying Negro women a bonus for each one they produce. To correct this imbalance in the production of surplus commodities, the Honorable Bruce Bennett, attorney general of Arkansas, propo~es , in effect, that a stop be put to the provision in Federal-State financed welfare programs which authorizes the payment of taxpayers' money to Negro women for something they are going to do anyway. The attorney general charged that in Arkansas Negro women with a whole slue of illegitimate children collect their welfare bonus and turn it over to the NAACP which completes the vicious circle by using the money to stir up racial trouble in that State. Much of the unrest be­tween races, he believes. could be alleviated if government would get out of that field and let nature handle the situation. In the South colored illegitimate babies have always been taken as a matter of course. White people have attributed this unfortunate and tragic situation to the pecu liar moral code of the colored race and no issue was ever maae or the matter until Congress steoped in with its Socialistic welfare plan and appropriated money to regulate the supply. Before they were subsidized by the Federal arJd State governments, many Negro women made no secret of the fact that their large brood of illeg it imate children each had different fathers but this practice never became a racket until they found out they could get paid good money for it. All Honor To A Group Of Women Who Know What They Are Doing The National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution provides a bright and sh ining example of the valuable service women can render . in awaken ing patriotic interest of the people in matters of government,. when they seriously work toward th1s end. The grand women who compose this great organization possess coura_g~ and characte: r of a ~igh order an.d do not gather up their skirts and sc•:ealn, When th~t ternble bugabao, tt ·•controversial" subject, is turned loose in their conference room. Instead, they attack it wilh vigor, determination and common sense. They have the understanding and the intelligence to real ize that in this period of the nation's peril, everything that is sound, good and hon­orable is "controversial" and that unless they can meet vital issues head-on and deal with them with firmness, force and vision, there is no earthly use for their organization in the first piace. They don't get together and whisper to each other about the sad State of the Union, the infiltration of Communism into our institutions and the corruption and crookedness of the nation's leaders - and then do nothing about it. They go thoroughly into every question of paramount importance to the American people, discuss it from every angle and make their de­cision. Then they come out of the corner fighting. . They have no timidity whatever in going boldly on. record for the so~nd American principles of government in which they so devoutly beheve and they see nothi.ng detrimental to th~ir organization by lining up in behalf or Americamsm, rather than shnnking in the corner and praying that others will win the fight. Every good American who is seriously concerned over the future of this co~ntry should bow low in reverence to this great body of cour­ageous, militant and outspoken women whose all-consuming ambition is not to spare themselves petty criticism but to help rescue the American Republic. While we do not 01·dinarily think that this country slwuld become involved in foreign entanglements, our 1·esponsibility to Nationalist China is undeniable. After all, it was our own State Department which was largdy responsible for selling out that great nation to the £ommunists. To fail to defend Generalissimo Chiang Kai-Shek"s governrnent would be to compound treachery. In Fort Worth a 27-year old man whipped his nineteen-day old baby until it died. Sob-sister juries be­ing what they are, we suppose he will be set Jree on the ground that he acted in self-defense. «Jt"s strange that the govern­ment which dispatches troopers to protect self-rule in Lebanon uses armed forces to destroy home-ntle in the South," says Senator Her­man Talmadge of Georgia. •--------- - ing light and glory. I leave the Senate with regret. Ire· turn to my home in Indiana with hope and joy. Whereverweare,weshallcon­tinue working together, to make sure that this new birth of freedom shall not perish from the. earth. Judicial authorities in Texas a.1·e asking for the appointment of three new Federal jtiClges jo1· th.e State, but for Heaven's sake can't we wait until after 1960? It is jar better that court cases pile up a mile high than for the State to be saddled with the type of Federal judge Eisenhowe1·'s advisers would be likely to name. From a su.bscribe1· in Indianap­olis: "You have never written any­thing better 1 han your lead edi­torial on the Pentagon Surrender Plan. You hit them right between the eyes. I hope they have the manhood to 1·ead it through and then get down on their knees .. , Oetober, "51 Southern Governors Meet Do Nothing And Adjourn Southerners will have to look hard at the accomplishments of the Southern Governors Conference at Lexington, Kentucky, recently in order to find anything of which to be proud. It was one of the subtlest and most gentlemanly games of buck­passing and sidestepping a problem which has been witnessed in a long time, if not in history. With the burning issue of inte­gration ripping the nation apart and lhe Supreme Court denying to the South its Constitutional right of self-government, the governors discussed a few innocuous subjects, attended a horse race and went home. Chief handicap to any construc· tive decision or action were fence­straddling LeRoy Collins of Florida, Chairman of the Conference, MOd .. ern Republican McKeldin of Mary .. land and Slap-Happy Chandler or Kentucky who know nothing, and care Jess, about the fundamental principles involved in the Supreme Court's tyrannical rulings. .. Faubus or Arkansas and Griffin o.f Geor_gia who do have some un· derstanding of the subject and who are forthright enough to have brought the matter out into the open did not have a chance against these three dyed-in-the-wool inte· grationists together with those others present who are tag_ged with the insulting term of "moderates." The group li<:tened attentively to the One-Wortder Sir Leslie Knox Munro of New Zealand who held forth in a long speech in which he gave the Govenors the · old malarky that "the United Nations Is the world's only hope for peace." Who invited Munro to participate in a Southern Governors Conference and what possible relation the prob· !ems of New Zealand bear to those of the South was not explained. It is presumed that the Gover­nors were in complete agreement concernin_g- Motherhood, Virtue and the Ten Commandments, as noth­ing was announced to the contrary. Congress Tops Peak Years of Ancient Roman Depravity _A Washington newspaper man ~1th a head for figures has pub­l• shed some statistics on the last Congress which should raise the blood of all decent Americans to the boi ling point. In his column Mr. Jack K. Rus· sell informs us that during the sec· ond session of the 85th Congress which was in session ~138 days there was appropriated an average of $534,210,000.00 or taxpayers' money per day. The House voted $129.3 million for each of the 562 hours it was in session during the second session and the Senate for each session hour appropriated an average of $71,650,000. . And not a dime of it was their own money but funds which had been forcibly taken from the Amer· ican people through confiscatory tax legislation. This is a record unequalled by the most dissolute, dissipated and degenerate emperors in the pe~k years of Roman depravity.
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