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The Southern Conservative, Vol. 7, No. 2, February 1956
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The Southern Conservative, Vol. 7, No. 2, February 1956 - File 001. 1956-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 9, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/southern/item/217/show/208.

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(1956-02). The Southern Conservative, Vol. 7, No. 2, February 1956 - File 001. The Southern Conservative. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/southern/item/217/show/208

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The Southern Conservative, Vol. 7, No. 2, February 1956 - File 001, 1956-02, The Southern Conservative, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 9, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/southern/item/217/show/208.

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Title The Southern Conservative, Vol. 7, No. 2, February 1956
Contributor
  • Darden, Ida M.
Publisher Southern Conservative
Date February 1956
Language English
Subject
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
Place
  • Fort Worth, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 10604411
Collection
  • Houston Metropolitan Research Center
  • Ida M. Darden Collection
  • The Southern Conservative
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Houston Metropolitan Research Center.
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript THE SOUTHERN CONSERVATIVE -To Plead for a Return b' Constitutional Government- Vol. 7 FORT WORTH, TEXAS, FEBRUARY, 1956 No.2 South Has Become the Nation's Last Hope Of P~eserving Constitutional Government Supervisor Checks and Finds Everything Well in Hand A chummy clambake was tossed for Eleanor Roosevelt at Conrad Hilton's fancy wagon yard in Houston recently by some of her comrades in the American Assoc~ iation for the United Nations. Following the festivities, the lady with the roving feet indicat­ed that she felt that everything was under control in that city. There was much less "tension" on this visit than during her last. trip she said later in her column indicating, perhaps, that she may be able to lessen her visits to that port of call in future and still keep things from getting out of hand. She complained that some Hous­ton papers carried articles and let­ters almost daily against the Unit­ed Nations but added happily: "Curiously enough that seems to have very little effect on the peo­ple." What does she mean "the peo­ple" and who does she think writes those articles and letters condemning the United Nations which appear in Houston papers daily? Pixies, maybe, or some little pollywogs, yet? Sto,kpile of Surplus Advisers May Be Causing the White House to Sag We were dumbfounded to read in News Week magazine that the White House is now regarded by Washington authorities as outmoded, entirely too small and practically a relic of the days when we "signed a peace pact with the Indians." The President is reported as complaining about the cramped quarters where some of his aides have to work "elbow to elbow" and was quoted as having remarked irritably that there was no use increas­ing his staff if there was no place for them to work. A commission has been named, it was pointed out, which is doing some long-range planning for a bi~er and better White House which will presumably have room for everybody. All this was news to us and so completely bowled us over that we almost swallowed our bubble gum. It was just a little more than three years ago when almost $6,000,000 was spent in remodeling and _re­decorating the White House and we were laboring under the deluslOn that it was now a pretty cozy little lean-to. Speaking of pacts with the Indians, maybe that, indirectly, sug­gests a sort of clue to the present trouble. When the White House was new. we only signed a pact or a treaty once in a blue moon and then only after the Senate had thoroughly deliberated the subject, and executive agreements hadn't been invented. There were never more than one or two pacts lying loose around the place so maybe the carbon copies of the more than ten thousand pacts, treaties and executive agreements which have been entered into since the United Nations was set up, are helping to cause the oyer-crowded condition. Since we don't know much about building or architectural plans, we hate to be presumptious in offering a remedy for the situation but we do want to be helpful in the matter. And so we timidly point out that a lot of the pressure could be taken off if they didn't have so many advisers cluttering up the place. After all, a structure can only support just so many advisers per square foot and it is probably the over-supply now on hand that is causing the building to sag. Therefore, we respectfully suggest that it would be so much less e?Cpensive and save the taxpayers a lot of money if, instead of enlarging the White House, they would just thin out the advisers. .Qf course this would cause a terrific unemployment problem, but we've got a solution for that, too. They could give each one of these surplus advisers a job a~ cashier of those new-fangled soil banks they are planning to set up all over the country. Responsibl<!, law-abiding and freedom-loving citizens down in Dixie are doing a slow burn over the attempted usurpation of power by nine judicial delinquents on the Supreme co·urt who seek to exercise authority over the internal affairs of the several States which is specific­ally denied them under the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution. There is no disposition on the part of the outraged Southerners to participate in hasty, impulsive or ill-advised action, no marches on Washington are being planned and violent tactics by lawless elements will have no place on the agenda. The gradually­mounting fury which is snow-balling over the South is the natural expression of bitter resentment which wells up in the hearts of a free people in the faee of oppression and of the stern resistance which always rises to the challenge when official tyranny rears its ugly head. When the governors o[ several Southern States met in Virginia some weeks ago, it was not a political meeting in the usual sense of such gatherings. There were no discussions on the probable outcome of next FalPs national election; no potential favorite sons for vice president were tentatively trotted out and no speculation about which party might carry which State was indulged in. It was a deadly serious gathering of State Executives who believe with all the earnestness of their being that the great men who wrote the American Constitution meant it when they emphasized in the Bill of Rights that the several States of the union have paramount authority in the conduct of their internal affairs which the Federal government cannot, and must not, abridge. It was a small-scale, but no less momentous, get-together of Amer­ican patriots inspired by the same impulse which impelled the farmers of New England to assemble on the Commons more than a hundred and eighty years ago to mobilize resistance to insufferable acts of "tyranny inflicted on them by an arrogant English king. It was a session whose purpose was to plan strategy and map out a course of legal action for the redress of wrongs and was called by· those who are direct descendants of the gallant soldiers of the South who did not surrender their independence nor relinquish their sover­eignty when they laid down their arms on that April day at Appomattox in 1865. Out of that Virginia meeting has come a definite program based on the recognized right of interposit.ion when one or the other parties to the Compact between the States .and the Federal government delib­erately oversteps their authority and violates a provision of such Com­pact, entered into in good faith. While the issue of segregation provided the spark which touched off the flame of protest in the South, the far-flung implications of the Supreme Court's un-Constitutional assumption of authority over the internal affairs of sovereign States, has opened up such unlimited pos­sibilities of tyrannical dictation by a centralized government in Wash­ington, that heads of States outside the South are becoming alarmed and taking a second look at the ruling. If the Court can tell the South today that they must throw open their white schools to Negroes, it can tell the North tomorrow that they must throw open their churches for the professional use of prostitutes and gamblers. The principle involved in each instance is identical and, under their mis-interpretation of the Constitution, the Court has as much legal and moral right to issue one such decree as the other. (Continued On Page 2) Millions of Americans Y.hink It-The Southern Conservative Says It Page2 THE SOUTHERN CONS ER VATIVE February, 1956 Oxnam Joins Crusade to Convert Americans Can Get AT rue Picture Australians to Communist Cause Of the International Conspiracy Josef L. Hromadka of Czecho­slovakia, No. 1 Communist spokes­man in the religious world, and who was decorated by his country on July 23, 1951 for his contribu­tion to world Communism, is on a tour of Australia seeking converts Hromadka went to Australia in 1954 for the same purpose but the Aussies who have little love for Communism practically ran him out of the country. On his current tour, Hromadka has reinforcements with him in the form of several noted churchmen of the Western world chief among them being G. Bromley Oxnam who will sit on the platform when Hromadka speaks, according to in­formation in the Congressional Record of January 20, pages 863- 864. Oxnam who spent some time ex­plaining to the Un-American Ac­tivities Committee of Congress that he didn't know what he was doing when he joined numerous Com­munist fronts some years ago has apparently concluded that the time has come in this country when it is safe to no longer deny such af­filiations, and to come out under one's true colors. A group of four highly respect­ed American Protestant ministers together with a like number from other Western countries have formed a Truth Squad to follow the Hromadka-Oxnam p a r t y through Australia in an attempt to minimize their crusade to re­cruit Australian preachers to the cause of Communism. Something for Americans to "An Honest Man Is One Who Wm Stay Bought" There iJ an old saying among lob­byists that "an honest man is one who will stay bought." Many of these astute members of the "Third House" have often thought they had a lawmakers: vote in the bag after they had obligingly come across with the cash money to liquidate his "campaign expenses" only to learn to their sorrow that this same vote had later been knocked down to a higher bid by the opposition. It's the same way with the coun­tries whose support we have thought for years we were buying and paying for, only to have them double-cross us with their votes in the United Na­tions. They just won't "stay bought." England, for instance, is one of the countries whose support we have been buying for years and paying millions of dollars for it. In any kind of a show-down they almost invariably side with the Communists. Anthony Eden recently made a trip here and all Americans of normal intelligence realize that he cam"e after something and while they may never know what he asked for, they also know that it eventua1ly means money from the American treasury. But re­gardless of what they got, the English won't "stay bought" and will side with Bulganin's boys when it suits British purposes. The United States has paid a ter­rific price for its lack of statesman­ship in dealing with foreign countries and the situation is getting no better fast. We buy them but they won't "stay bought." "Get-Rich-Quick" Legislation Think About in Spare Time To Be Revived in California Since 1945 when the United States Senate - without reading the fine print in the United Nations Charter - voted us into that Atheistic gang, we have provided most of the millions to keep •it a:oing, although no human being knows the total amount of our gifts and contributions. In addition, we-have taken $51,000,- 000,000 away from the taxpayers of the United States and given it to for­eign countries in trying to stave off Communism. And what results have we accom­plished through this idiotic proced­ure? We have seen 800,000,000 people brought behind the Iron Curtain and have had concrete evidence that we are cordially hated by those nations to whom we have given money. A few more ''victories" like this and the American Republic will be wrapped in a shroud and prepared for burial in the cem.etery of dead nations. · The great hullaballoo that arose over Secretary of State Du.Ues' ~' brink of war" statement and which kept up for weeks, was a pitiable example of the sterility of mind and impoverished thinking that prevails in Washington these days. What was so important in a figure of speech that so-called statesmen should wrangle over it for days on end like little boys fussing over a marble game, while real issues get no attention what­ever? usome Southern senator ought to tell Earl Warren what Andrew Jackson told John Marshall: 'You have your law. Now let's see you enforce W" - John Borden, Spring Lake, Michigan. "Mental Health" proponents in Cal­ifornia who, two years ago, tried to slip a bill through their legislature which would allow a supervisor ap­pointed by the Governor to declare his enemies insane and take over their property, are at it again. A statewide movement is under way in that State to coordinate individuals and organizations into an intensive drive for the same legislation when their lawmakers assemble in the next session. The legislation will be spon­sored on the plea of improving the "mental health" o! the State. Chiel ramrod of the movement is one Irving S. Rosenblatt of San Fran- Members of the Lower House of Congress have exhibited not only an •. mdreamed-of measure of resourcefulness but actually su­per- human powers. They propose to get rid of the farm surplus by simply changing its name to "strategic reserve" and pretend­ing it doesn1t exist. Then they will go on from there .and build up more surplus farm products. Just as simple as that!!! Why didn't some one think of it before? From a Lieutenant-Colonel in Commonstown Moone, County Kildare, Ireland: "I would like to say I read the Southern Conserva­tive with the greatest possible in­terest and appreciation. We are fighting the same battle as you are. Of course we are friends with the Americans but are struggling against this horror of the one­world slave state. I wish ytlu good luck and flray that you. may awak­en your people in time as we pray to awaken our own". Americans who want to get an accurate picture of the interna­tional conspiracy against the Unit­ed States will find valuable in­formation in the speeches of Sena­tor William E. Jenner of Indiana on that subiect. We feel sure that interested parties may get copies of these discussions by writing him at the Senate Office Building, Washington, D. c. There is no one in the United States Senate who has a clearer perspective of all facets of the Communist plot to destroy the American Republic than Senator Jenner. There are those in that body who have vast knowledge of spe­cific subjects, in addition to gen­eral information, like Senator Harry Flood Byrd of Virginia whose superior understanding of fiscal policies of government and their impact on the national econ­omy is conceded; Senator Joseph R. McCarthy of Wisconsin who is more familiar with all the ramifi­cations of Communist infiltration than any other member and who could stamp it out if they could just gag and hog-tie all the Com­munist sympathizers on the Sen- From a woman rubscriber fn Phoenix, Arizona: ur have just completed reading the January editi4n of your paper and, as usual, wished that more people could be exposed to the excellent material you bring forth. Than1c you for your light; keep It burn­ing". ate floor; Senator George W. Malone of Nevada who has a com­plete grasp of the internationaJists' manipulation of tariff policies to the detriment of the industrial in .. ~e:~!i~r 0§a~~: O~n~~tla~~ate~i Mississippi whose conception of the proper functions of the federal government and its limitations when in conflict with the rights of the States is unsurpassed and others who have spent many years in serious study of the particu-lar phase of statecraft to which they are dedicated. But in correlating the various facets of the international con­spiracy against the American Re­public, it is our belief that Senator Jenner leads all the rest. South Has Become the Nation's (Continued from Page 1) The people of the South have, of course, long been conscious of the threat to their traditions and way of life posed by Communist agents with an eye on the vast possibilities for fomenting strife and dissension which was offered them in the large colored population in the Southern States. But their awareness of this potential threat stopped short of apprehension because of their basic belief in the protection them by the Bill of Rights and their reluctance to concede that any administration -in Washington could ever become so debased and so contemptuous of organic law and established custom that it would so shape its national policies as to conform solely to the social advance­ment of the cooks in their kitchens, the yard-boys mowing their lawns and the field hands picking their cotton. Southerners tolerated Roosevelt's vague babblings about the "Negro problem" in the South and his spasmodic demands for legisla­tion on the subject realizing, as they did, that he was an amiable four­flushing demagogue who wouldn't hesitate to exploit minority group propaganda for all it was worth so long as it served his own ends, but who never intended to go any further. They paid little heed to Truman's similar bid for the colored vote by occ~sional references to "civil rights" and "FEPC" and g~ve these mouthmgs the same casual inattention which they accorded his utter· ances on many subjects about which he knew so little. . Wh~n. Eis~nhow~r first came among them, accepted their hospi­tahty, vtstted m the1r homes and discussed his views with intimate groups, they regained their original feeling of security because of his professed respect for the Constitution and his solemn vows that there would be no interference by the Fede~al gpvernment in affairs which belonged exclusively to the States in the event he should become Presi· dent. Later he re-affirmed his position from the stump. . Cons~quentl~ when the segregation ruling was issued" by a hand­ptcke~ Ch1ef :Justice on that Black Monday in May of 1954 which ripped the BtU of Rtghts to shreds, reversed every decision of able jurists for the last hundred years and stripped the South of its cherished traditions, it was received in an atmosphere of stunned silence and shocked dis• belief followed by a long period of numbed inaction which deceptively gave the widespread impression of acceptance. The So~th is co~ing awake now and the courage, p;triotism and statesmanship of the Immortal John c. Calhoun is flowering again in the forthright official performance of such leaders as Senator James 0. Eastland of Mississippi, ~overnor Marvin Griffin and Attorney Gen• eral Eugene Cook of _Georgta and others, and seething indignation on the part of. slow-movmg, good-~atured Southerners is steadily boiling ~i~~ ~!'~~~g~~~=~e~qb;l~~e:~~~'st~a;~~o~~t\~~ ~~arighteous anger Settlement of the litigation to follow may be years in the deciding but on its outcome will depend the fateful and monumental issue of whether Constitutional government i,g to survive in the United States or whether, instead, the totalitarian system of the Soviet Republic shall have come to take its place. Februc1ty, 1956 THE SOUTHERN CONSERVATIVE 'In Fight on Socialism Big Fish Will We Think That We Do Nothing but Swim With Tide' Know the Answer The Southern States Industrial Council of Nashville, Tennessee, of which Mr. E. J. McMillin is president, had an article in a recent edition of a semi-monthly Bulletin which it puts out that tells how cowardly and un4 patriotic many heads of big industry have proved themselves to be and how shamefully they have contributed to the march towaFd national Social­ism now under way in this country. The article is titled "Hooked" and every pretended advocate of Free Enterprise who heads a big business concern but, at the same time, plays ball with Washington Socialists and refuses to help patriotic groups who are trying to stamp out Socialism, should blush clear down to the roots of his hair when he reads it: Talk to the heads of the larger industries in this country to-day, and what do you find? Almost in­variably they are strong for free enterprise. They are opposed to the encroachments of the socialist state. They know the dangers that lie in big government, and in a looming labor monopoly. But try and get these tycoons to do anything about it! Suggest any kind of political action or economic action to counter the socialist trend - and watch them back away like sheep from a sulphur spring. Why is this? Why do these big, able Americans, who perceive clear­ly what is happening to the country and to their enterprises, shy away from any action to hold the fort? Because they are already hooked. In the first place, the New Deal threw the fear of big government Who Dat? Dat Who <ionna Rule Over Us All Someday When the Bandung Conference was held t.o:arly last year, thinking people saw in it the menace it was but our high officials praised this world con­ference of colored races, from which white people were barred, as a great movement tor the "promotion of in­ternational unity, peace and good will." Adam Clayton Powell is a Harlem Negro now in Congress. On January 2 this Negro, who ~ also a Baptist preacher and who in 1945 wrote "Marching Blacks," told a colored congregation in Newport News, Vir­ginia: "Anglo-Saxons are no longer the world's ruling race and nations throughout the world are looking to the American Negro and asking: How can you be the leaders of tomorrow if you are the second class citizens of today? . , . It is sinful not to vote, Every church should be turned into a ~~~t~:I t:~;~~~~r~~r;isfe~~r~n~er;o~! doesn't have the money to pay his poll tax, the church should lend him the necessary funds.'' Powell was one of the delegates to the Bandung Conference. Even some of the columnists who are not opposed to "integra· tion'' are becoming alarmed be­cause the educational level in Washington where Negro and white children are all scrambled up together, has dropped far be­low the national level. Any one with intelligence enough to write a column should realize that this "levelling off" business is part of the world Communist conspiracy which is behind the "integration·· movement. Of course the educa­tional, moral, and every other kind of a teve! wi!! drop but, after all, that was the big idea. It was npl.anned that way". What is the infcl"ence to be drawn into them; fear of pressure, investi4 when an American citizen and tax-gations, I abo r t r o u b 1 e, credit payer asks the State Department in squeeze, tax reprisals, etc. and got Washington for a certain incriminat-away with it. ing document printed by that agency inJ~st~~e t~~:~1~s ~lraac:,in:v;:%m blg ~~o~9 :~at~:en':;~h~~cse~;~~s d:cu~~~Z ~~ :~:~r~~~~t ~~~i;~~~s:nd~:~~n~~ ~~c~~~e~f t~~n~o~~~~!:~t t~~o~~m;r/~::l~ indirect. Their bread is already but- contacts in Washington? tered largely by Washington. They are hooked good and tight. We doubt that the heads of big basic industries are going to save the cpuntry for free enterprise or free anything. Fortunately. this doesn't apply to the numerous patriots at somewhat lower levels of industry, many of whom do not fear Washington, politicians, or the devil himself. These men can be counted on. We know quite a num­ber of such men who spend their energies and money freely to fight socialism wherever it shows its head. But the really biggest fish are not to be counted on for anything except to swim with the tide. These latter are already on the govern­ment line and can't get away. That happened to us within the past few days and we are still wondering what the score is. Did the State Department not want us to have it, or were they honestly mistaken in saying it was "out of print?" Your answer is as good as OJlrs, but it is probably more charitable. Unanimity of opinion on the Supreme Court is becoming so commonplace that many Ameri­cans are wondering if there is not a very fine distinction between unanimity and collusion and the fear is expressed in some quar­ters that the justices may develop ·a permanent crick in their necks from constantly nodding asse~ National Council of Churches Exposed By A Committee of Its Own Selection Even though its pronouncements have come perilously near to subversive utterances, Congressional committees have never dared to investigate the National Council of Churches because they thought it was a religious organization and represented "34,000 ,000" Protestant church members as it claimed. Now they know better and realize that it merely represents a closely-knit group of left-wing ministers who vote ''ten to one" against their lay members who feel that the Council has no place in the field of sociology. economics and politics, and who have told th ~ Cou ncil so. The feeling of the lay members of churches who belong to the National Council was rev~aled in a Report by a committee of 190 lay members, headed by J. Edgar' Pew of Philadelphia, former president of Sun Oil Company, and selected by the Council itself to go into wide­spread charges that the Council is more of a political than religious organization. However, when the committee composed of educators, bankers, manufacturers, labor leaders, physicians, agriculturists, editors and publishers, federal officials, judges, scientists and others, after four years' ~tudy, turned in its report strongly condemning the Council's participation in questions relating to "sociology, economics and polic tics," the report was withheld, the Committee dissolved and advised by Dr. Eugene Carson Blake, President of the Council, to " take part in other activities." (Dr. Blake is chairman of a delegation of ministers from the National Council which is leaving in March for a long visit with Communist churchmen in Moscow.) The summary of the report by the Lay Committee appears in the February 3 edition of U. S. News and World Report, together with a letter from Chairman Pew explaining how the clergy in the Council always voted lay members down "ten to 1" when lay members protested political activities by the Council. Questions that Congress must take months to decide are disposed of by the National Council inside a half hour, the Report claimed and indicated that policy makers of the Council did not hesitate to pass on political matters and take a stand not sanctioned by lay members of the churches affiliated with the CounciL A Statement of Economic Principles drafted by the Council as the official policy of that body was unanimously opposed by the lay Com­mittee, the Report disclosed, which says that in April, 1953 the lay Committee ''spoke out sharply against it." The members of the lay Committee believed and so stated that the political adventures of the National Council and its attitude on contro­versial questions "would seriously hinder, and not further, Christian leadership in the pressing fields of evangelism, fellowship and educa­tion." Chairman Pew expressed hope that a program could be developed through which laity and clergy may "more effectively work together for the greater glory of God and the redemption of all mankind," but appeared to have little hope that this can be accomplished under the Council's present leadership. To those who have read the Southern Conservative for the six years of its existence, it is unnecessary to point out how strictly this Report confirms our position in the matter. · All church members interested in facts would do well to iet hold of a copy of the Committee's report and read it for themselves. Page) Now There's Nothing We Haven't Heard Members of the United States Senate who voted us into the Unit­ed Nat.ions without reading the fine print in the Charter, and lived to regret it, had better read H. R. 6376 now before them and be sure they don't buy another pig in a poke. The measure passed the House by that cute little device known as " voice vote" which is frequent­ly employed when the members are ashamed of their vote and don't want it put on record. The bill provides that we shall buy a million acres of land in Alaska and spend $12 ,500,000 building an insane asylum up there in which anybody could be declar­ed insane and tucked away on the word of the gover.nor of Alaska , or the governors of any of the forty~ eight American States. Off-hand it sounds like a ducky idea and if we could be sure that the ones who introduced it and voted for it would be the first ones to be sent there, we would be for it ourselves. Right of trial by jury would be abolished, leaving the decision as to who is crazy and who is not up to politicians to decide. And if there is any neater way for a poli· tician to liquidate an opponent than to get a friendly governor to declare him insane and bundle him off to Alaska, we can't think of it. Russia has a better plan for dis­posing of its polit ical prisoners They send them to Siberia where the weather gets forty .below just as it does in Alaska, but they don't bother to build $12,000 ,000 str uc­tures to shelter them, but let them largely shift for themselves. So long as we are copying the Russian idea, why not go the whole hog? Why not dispose of those who hold opposing views from the po1i­ticians in power by just sending them to Alaska to freeze to death? It is just as humane as the plan proposed in H. R. 6376 and a lot cheaper. The bill is the same one intro­duced by a pink lady named Green from Oregon during the last ses­sion of Congress. Texans Oppose Federal Aid to Education Although Mr. Jumes D. King, Superintendent of the Brownwood, Texas, public schools was, correctly, listed by us in the January edition as a professional educator and one of the nine professionals out of twelve writing reports for the topics listed for discussion at the recent White House Conference on Education, we did not mean to imply that he favored Federal Aid to Education. We merely meant to point out that professionals were in heavy majority in a conference where advance infor­mation from Conference officials said that it would be largely a gathering of "laymen." As a matter of fact, Superintendent King made the headlines while he was in Washington attending the conference with a statement calling for the federal government to keep its fingers out of local school affairs and on his return publicly branded the Conference as "the greatest farce ever perpetrated." The Texas delegation to the Con­ference took the sound position that the operation of the public schools is a State, and not a federal, function. Page 4 -----________T_ H_E_So _u_TH _ER _N_c_o_N_S_ER _V_A_T_I_V_E _________F_ eb'_"•.:_:·~ Oh,No? Not That All Over Again! The Southern Ctmservative A MO:-.JTHLY PUBLICATION OF EDITORIAL OPINION WITH NATIONAL CIRCULATION IDA M. DARDEN, Ed;to' Edi~orial Offices Flatiron Building Fort Worth, Texas PhoneFA-2089 Price $5.00 Per Year !Every paidsubsc:riberisenfitledtoone free subscription tobesenlloanyperson ofhisehoosinq.) Sent without eott to members of Congreu, members of State legislatures, Governors, and other public: officials. A helpless sparrow can drift with the wind but it takes ttn eagle to fly against the storm. THE TENTH AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES: Thepowersnotdelego~~tedtotheUnited Staifts by the Constitution, nor prohibihd by it to the Shies are reserved to the Shies respeelively, or to the people. Americans Must Realize That 'Ciatt' Means No Ciood for Us 'l'he term GATT is a harmless­sounding alphabetical designation out o{the thousands of similar ones which have sprung up during recent years, but, actually, it is one of the most dangerous angles of the World Con­spiracy aga inst the United States which has yet been exposed. The subject is so complicated and so many millions of words have been used in its preparation that it is next to impossible for any one to under­stand it unless they make a career of studying it. We Toss in Our Bit on How To Settle the Farm Problem Practically everybody is giving advice on how to bring about the solution of the so-called farm problem and we see no reason why we should keep out of the argument. Fundamentally. the trouble lies in the fact that more people are farming with a fountain pen than with a plow. Farmers have always had their good years and their bad ones and such misfortunes as flood, drouth, pests and low prices were regarded as occupational hazards which were taken in stride. In the section o{ West Texas where we were born, for instance, there were children who had never seen rain. We came into the world during a_seven-year drouth and when we were {our years old and a heavy rain started falling, we were so frightened that we darted under a bed and couldn't be dragged out until the rain stopped and the sun came out. At that time no one thought to blame Congress for the lack of moisture or call on them to make restitution for the failure of the elements to function at stated intervals. Before Roosevelt and his-swarm of Harvard brain trusters hit the White House with brief cases full of quack remedies, farmers always took the bad luck with the good just like everybody else and if they couldn't make a go of it, they moved to town and got a job. Up until that time, they had been operating on the theory that God dwelt in a Mansion in the Skies and not in the White House on Pennsylvania Avenue. . It was when fountain-pen farmers started throwing trick words like <~parity" around and sending out tons o{ sob stories about the sorry plight of the Amerit.:an farmer, that the country boys got sorry for themselves and started putting the bee on the Federal treasury. The farm problem is an artificially-created one like the <~Negro problem" in the South which didn't exist until a few horse-faced squaws stumbled on it while looking around for something to reform. Any way, both the Democrats and the Republicans have wrangled with the farm problem for a quarter of a century with disastrous re­sults not only [or the farmers but for the whole economy. The farmers are getting harder to please every day, the price that politicians have to pay for the farm vote is getting higher by the year and American taxpayers are having to shell out a million dollars a day for storage alone on surplus farm products which we ''don't need, can't possibly use, and can't even give away" and .which have accumulated solely because of cock-eyed schemes cooked up by fountain-peR farmers in Washington. There are only two guys who can do anything constructive in settling the farm problem. One of them is named "Supply" and the other "Demand." If the politicians will only confess ignorance, admit failure and step aside, the farm problem will take care of itself. Adlai Bobs Around On the 'Hot Seat' ~ Frankfurter Makes Hamburger Out of Senator George W. Malone of '·I hope very much the North and Nevada and Representative Cleveland South can live together. That's the Immigration Authority ~~~~~!~~y~t~~~;~~s~i~~~i~a~:e g~:~ kind of America I believe in." into the matter as thoroughly as it is This silly and inane statement was possible for h~ne~t men to probe and made by Adlai Stevenson in Los An- ~=~~~~~cl~h~rol~t~~a~~: c~~~t~!~t~e~~· gcles rccent.ly in an e{(ort to wriggle on the destruction of a mighty nation. out of a light spot when a Negro asked him his stand on "integration." The thing was set up fint under the title of International Trade Organ­ization, shortened to ITO, by the United Nations in 1946 for the pur­pose of dismantling American indus­try in the interc~t of rising living standards over the world. The JTO thing failed after being denounced by the American Bar As­SO!=! iation as a P.,'lrt of the scheme for world govC'rnment. But the Reds never give up so in 1947, under the sponsorship o{ the American State Department, delegates were called together in Geneva where they shaped up the same thing, only worse, called GATT. There were 23 nations represented at Geneva and the very peculiar agency set up at that time requires a booklet o[ 3,000 png:C's just to outline the provisions of the thing and this booklet can be secured nowhere except at the Colum­bia Uni\"C'rsity Press in New York at a cost of fifteen dollars. It would be futile to try to brief the various provisions in it, of course, but the idea throughout is to reduce the standard of living in the United States by a system of tarifi sched­ules which will benefit foreign coun­tries nt ·the expense of the United State•. Nobody was there to represent u.s ex~ the State Department and naturally we came out at the little end or the horn. About the best Americans can do is memorize the word GATT and Mr. Stevenson has forgotten ap­parently that the North and South lived together very satisfactorily {or almost a hundred years tmtil his own pal"ly admitted Communist Russia to this country and the barbarians start­ed stirring up trouble .. :iidcd by do-mcstic Red sympathizers. Stevenson told the Negroes in Los Angeles that: •·we have to proceed gradually in these matters. You do not upset the traditions of genera­tions overnight." ln his desire to get Negro support without losing white votes, he bobbed around on the hot seat, forgetting, or seeming to, that "gradual integration" is no less im­moral than •·swift integration." It is amusing what a donkey a man can make of himscU when the itch Cor public office attacks him. From a member of the United States Senate: ur don't believe you realize how much good your paper ~~g. Keep it up". when the question of our renewed participation in it comes up before Congress which it will, advise their representatives to at least read it before they vote on it. This will keep them occupied for at least six months and maybe by that time, enough of them will realize what it means to vote against it. Immigration officials who thought they were empowered by law to question immigrants pour­ing into the United States in ef­forts to find out whether or not they are undesirables have found such authority has been chopped to bits by a Supreme Court ruling which denies them such authority from now on. Foreigner~ who have become naturalized cannot be made to give testimony which might be used against them in deportation pro­ceedings, the decision said. The ruling was written by FeHx Frankfurter, Austria's gift to the American Judiciary system, and was handed down without a dis­senting opinion by other justices. From a retired Army General; "You have a powerful pen and your thrusts have a penetrating and lasting force because you in­troduce a humorous vein which makes extremely interesting read­ing. Too much of the dry patriotic stuff that is distributed reaches ;~:d'~aste basket without being There is some talk of deporting "Tokyo Rose" the female traitor who dealt misery and heartache to American boys during World War IT, but it is probably just a lot of hot air. It seems that in this country, deporting or impeaching ~nybody ·any more for anything ts a lost art no matter what their off~nse against the national se­cunty or the Constitution. We believe that the majority of Americans look with a jaundiced eye on the prospect of another President's wife engaging in politi­cal action on the side- At least they would ~1opP that she enter this field in a manner a 1itt1e less gcgging than the approach the present First Lady seems to have chosen. Most people feel that they have had it in that department. For her first public utterance designed to attract votes, Mrs. Eisenhower wrote a letter for publication highly commending an abnormal and apparently bad­ly- adjusted New York girl with a flair for eccentric behavior, to put it politely. Declaring that she felt that she "had wasted her life", this seven­teen year old white girl enrolled in an all-Negro school in Ashe­ville, North Carolina, operated by the Methodist church with an en­rollment of 130 colored teen-agers of both seXQS, whereupon Mrs. Eisenhower commended her for "making t he road to integration a shorter one" and assured her that she was "much to be admired" for taking such a step. Meantime, in Moria Center New York, the mother of the girl proudly gave out a statement to the press in which she explained that her daughter was a blue­eyed blonde which, we'd say, should make her tremendously popular in the particular social circle in which she will hereafter traveL Well, it's- been a long, pleasant interval since the days when Eleanor R0osevelt used to bouuce out of the White Hot! e, leap a platform and seemingly take delight in seeing how many peo­ple she could shock and disgust with her fantastic and perverted proposals for the social behavior of the human race. Of course she still does it but her mouthings no longer have a background of White House sanction and are generally taken as the harmless outpourings of an over-active mind, coupled with an under-ex­ercised brain. All of which reminds us that, regardless of what Harry Truman did to the nation's economy or our foreign relations, his wire and daughter offended no one by get­ting out and trying to lasso votes for the party or otherwise viola­ting the rules of good taste tra­ditionally imposed on women who occupy the American White House. Poor Ezra Taft Benson, federal Commissioner o f Agriculture can't seem to learn that any e."C­pression of common sense in Washington is strictly taboo and is regarded as an insult to those who avoid all appearance of san­ity as they would the plague. When he inadvertently approved a sound statement of fact in a national magazine recently, Wash­ington politicians fell on him like hyenas on a dead rabbit. Loud­mouthed Hubert H- Humphrey of Minnesota led the pack and Ben­son, as usual, was forced to back down and apologize. The state­ment was in Harper's Magazine and said: "The farmers are being subsidized to produce millions of tons of things-cotton, wheat, rice, butter and so on-which we don't need, can't possibly use. and can't even give away". February, 195b THE SOUTHERN CONSERVATIVE Page 5.. Bishop Warns Againist Citizens Councils But Is Silent About Communist Fronts Those in attendance at the 107th annual council of the Episcopal Diocese of Texas held at Tyler recently were given some father­ly advic,e by Bishop John E. Hines With ominous mien and in solemn tones, the good Bishop warned his communicants not to have anything to do with those big, bad old Citizens Councils which are springing up like mush­rooms all over East Texas. They are nothing but groups of citizens banned together tor the avowed purpose of 11defymg the law of the land" the eminent Di­vine told his audience. By "the law of the land" the good man was referrin~ to the ~'law" providing for mixmg little white and black children in pub­lic schools which was "enacted" by the kangaroo Supreme Court one day when its nine judicial boy scouts were feeling their oats and decided that· there wasn't any­thing Congress could do that they couldn't do better, by heck! The Bishop said he would be unfaithful to his responsibilities if he did not caution his followers against joining things like Citi­r: ens Councils. By his "responsibilities" he was no doubt referring to his denomi­n& tion's responsibilities to the Na­tional Council of Churches to which it belongs. The NCC does not like for the members of its af­filiated churches to be be identi­fied with such organizations as Citizens Councils. It does not, however, prohibit membership in Communist front organizations which is understandable. It doesn't want to lose some of its high-rank­ing officials. It was noted that Bishop Hines did not include Communist Fronts in his warning to his flock against affiliation with groups whose avowed purpose is 11defying the law of the land". <(It is absurd to expect the So­viet leaders to cease their efforts to soften up our minds. But Con­gress can deal with the agencies which distribute enervating ideas within our borders. Studies like the report on the Institute of Pa­cific Relations by the Senate In­ternal S e cur i t y Subcommittee and the report on penetration of certain foundations, by the Reece Committee, point the way to the new solution. We will never create a stable, military program for the defense of America until Am eric an p u b Z i c opinion is cleansed of hidden pro-Commu­nist controls. These years of dfl­lusion and defeat will have been worth-while if, Phoenix-like, we can rise from the death of our hopes to begin a new era in which American truths will be clearer, stronger, more stirring than the myth of Communism" - Senator William E. Jenner of Indian~.=_ If Congress keeps on surrender­ing its rights to the .Judicial and Executive branches of govern­ment there soon won't be anything for them to do except appropriat.e money. If it were not for thts chore, they could all just quit and go fishing. For the People And the State (From Chal'leston, S. C., News and Courier) In an editorial attack on the Fed­eration for Constitutional Govern­ment, recently launched as a nation­wide movement at Memphis, The New York Times asks the question , ''Whose Constitution?" The answer, of course, is the Con­stitution that was adopted- and sub­sequently amended-by the sovereign states of the Union. Those states would not have submitted to a com­pact without certain safeguards. The safeguards were written into the Con­stitution itself. A political decision of the U. S. Supreme Court has destroy­ed the safeguards. It has thrown some of the states into a condition of dangerous internal unrest. What protection have the states af­fected by the decision against usur­pation of powers by the Supreme Court? Is there no appeal? Indeed there is an appeal. The ap­peal is to the powers of the people and the states, as specifically reserv­ed by the tenth amendment of the Constitution. If the United States wishes to ban segregcltion of the races in public schools by a constitutional metho~, the way is provided. The way ts amendment of the Constitution. Be­cause founders of the Republic real­ized the dangers of a usurping feder­al government, they provided that only by consent or three fourths of the state legislatures could the Con­stitution be amended. Enemies of the Southern way of dealing with the race problem - a way that has enabled the races to live in reasonable peace and .har­mony these many decades - knew they could not muster the power to amend the Constitution. So they en­gineered a backdoor way-namely, by having the Supreme Court write into the Constitution powers for the federal government that do not exist. Whose Constitution? Does The New York Times regard the Constitution as the creature of the Supreme Court? The Times well remembers the era of Prohibition. One thing to be said for the laws that banned liquor is that they were constitutional. Con­gress and the states DID amend the Constitution according to lawful pro­cedure. But the peQple -did not accept Pro­hibition. They flagrantly broke the law. Nkmy newspapers - includi~g The Times - called for repeal. D1d The Times regard Prohibition as ir­revocable? Was The. Times a patriot or a renegade when it assailed the 18th Amendment to the Constitution? Whose Constitution was it then? If we who • ow oppose the Supreme Court's decision on segregation as unlawful and unconstitutional are "a radical and destructive fo,·ce," as The Times charges, what about those who h.trigued and fought to upset the "equal but separate" doc~rine? That too was the law as interpreted by the Suprfmle Court until May 17, 1954. On that Black Monday nine men, clothed in robes or justice, de­cided that their distinguished prede­cessors were wrong; that the English language does not mean what it says, and that the court itseU has greater power than the Constitution ever in­tended. Whose Constitution? It is not the Constitution of The New York Times, 'Mental Health' Can Mean a Lot Of Things So We Better Watch It terrific assault is going to be volt by means of the mental health Congress by sinister forces racket and the connivance of a judi­bencfactors of mankind ciary willing to go along with the a "mental health pro- new theory of subjugation of the hu­man mind through Iron Curtain pro­The objective will be to get legis­lation passed which, in its ultimate ~f:~i~n w!~p:!~e s~~\~e:ino~e~f ;~~: minds and the authority to beat down all opposition of patriotic Americans who are combatting the current wave of subversion which has all but en­gulfed the United States. If any one doubts this potential threat through a mass efrort to brain­wash dissenting Americans, they should read some of the proposed bills on the subject which have already been introduced in various State legislatures. A California measure, for instance, provided for the appointment of a "mental counsellor" invested with un­believable authority in passing on the sanity of the citizens and em­powered to haul them off to an in­stitution without benefit of a jury ;~!~\n~aok~e c~:re~~a~: t~1~~ ~~~;;~~~: sess and perform generally in the manner of the head of the Soviet Secret Police. It was defeated only when a few alert and inCormed women went to Sacramento and refused to budge until they had convinced lawmakers who were going to vote for it without reading it, just what the thing would mean. Most of those introduced in other State legislatures were similar in intent since they sprang from the same common source. A ghastly preview of what such legislation could mean has been af­forded the American people through the beastly and unspeakable treatment which has been visited on those who do not whole-heartedly embrace the "liberal" philosophy which currently motivates the official actions of our local, state and national leaders. ica~Y ::i~;~~~8~ve~t~nf~~~ne~;;;e~f Lucille Miller of Bethel, Vermont, and the barbaric manner in which she was railroaded first to a mental in­stitution in Vermont and then in Washington because of her intense OP­position to Communism and to what she conceived to be Communist-in­spired measures enacted by Congress. In her case it was a combination of an attempt to subdue a citizen's re- Even though the Urban League has been exposed time and again as a vtcious propaganda outfit whose main objective is to pro­mote the influx of Negroes into white neighborhoods, most Com­munity Chest leaders continue to give money to the League on the ground that it is "charitable." At its recent national convention in Detroit the National U r b an League went on record as declar­ing that "school integration will be 'worthless' unless neighbor­hoods are mixed." Any person contributing to C om m unity Chests which give money to this group is guilty of aiding in the League's propaganda. nor of the nine justices who rewrote the charter of American li.bertles one Monday morning. It is the Con­stitution of the people and of the STATES. Some or those states are now planning to interpose their sovereignty in behalf of their citizens. This means that they will invoke a higher law than the Supreme Court. They will invoke the Const1tutlon it­self to save themselves and the Re­public to which they belong. cedure Lucille Miller was. and is, not only not insane but is possessed of a mind of exceptional bl'illiance and clarity but unfortunately (Cor her) it was directed towarf the exposure of peo­ple and practices she believed to be detrimental to the safety and secur­ity of her country. No outstanding "liberal" has, or likely will be, ~ ub­jec\ ed to the shameful treatment ac­corded her. Because of her outspoken views a Federal judge who was the recipient of some of her printed barbs, hauled her into court and assumed the triple role of judge, jury and prosecutor by committing her to an insane asylum where some jack-leg psychiatrist pro­nounced her of unsound mind. The procedure was stripped of every vestige of human dignity and the Constitutional rights of the indi­vidual swept aside with a measure of arrogance not surpassed by Musso­lini, Hitler or Stalin at the height of their power. She was practically drag­ged from her home without being giv­en an opportunity to see or provide for her three small children who were in the school room at the time, to say nothing of being deprived of the right of a trial by jury to test her sanity. While many Americans disagreed with Mrs. Mi.J.ler's action in deliber­ately violating a Federal law in order to test its unconstitutionality, the in­human manner in which she was handled led to such a storm of angry and outraged protest that she was brought back to Vermont and given the trial to wh ich she was entitled in the first place. Later she was found guilty of inciting young men to test the draft law's constitutionality by ignoring it and is now free on appeal. Regardless of the final outcome, the sordid affair will forever consti­tute a blot on the ada1inistration of justice in an American •ourt which is comparable to that dispensed to the populace in the unhappy days of the French Bastille. A sound and authentic mental health program, sponsored and ap­proved by medical authorities of un­questioned standing in their profcs-... sian is entitled to the full approval of every right-thinking American but one designed to suppress opposition of the citizen to political policies or his government must not be tolerated. There must never be a recurrence of the s:•.ame!ul OGPU methods which attended the Lucille Miller case. A Very Simple Question That No One Can Answer Sponsors of the Unfted Nations claim that its purpose is to prevent wars and insure peace and apolo­gists for it in the administration insist that one of its ·objectives is to defend the whole so-called free world. How can either of these object­ives be attained so long as Russia and her Satellites who constitute the only threats to peace and who make a defense of the "free" world necessary, are in there helping to run the show? If this riddle can be solved in­telligently, we will withdraw our objections. That settles it: Henry Agard Wal­lace has endorsed the Eisenhower proposal for a soil bank, whatever that is. TH E SOUTHERN CON SERVATI VE Reuther's Goons Appeal to Supreme Court to Uphold Right to Violence Labor union gangsters are active again at the Kohler plant in Wiscon­sin from which they have been on strike tor many months. The particular expression ot dis­pleasure at the moment consists of hurling large rocks through plate glass picture windows in the homes of non-participants in the long strike against the Kohler plant at Kohler, Wisconsin. In some cases the lawless thugs made mistakes and threw huge boul­ders into the homes of persons who were not, and had never been, con­nected with the Kohler Company. In one instance they hurled an eight-pound rock through a window in the night and smashed a baby bed to bits from which the child, for­tunately, had been removed only a few moments before. In that case, the head of the house was not em­ployed by Kohler but had installed Kohler fixtures in his bathroom. The vandals are members of Walter Reuther's United Automobile Workers Union. The State Employment Relations Board declared the union guilty of violating state Jaw and orderd an end to such conduct, after they had been carrying on vandalism for months. The Sheboygan County Circuit Court enforced the order and the Wisconsin Supreme Court upheld the order. The Union has appealed to the Supreme Court to uphold them in their right to commit vandalism and even murder in an efiort to gain their point. The matter is now before the high court whose members have agreed to pass on it. If there are those who think that the Supreme Court is going to rule unfavorably on a Communist·sym­pathizing group as strong as the UAW, they will please line up on the left and stand on their heads. It's Wise Men Who Know When to Stop There's a strange and unwonted silence on the part of the NAACP so far as the South is concerned. No new suits are being filed, no threatening interviews appearing in the press and no big New York mulattoes ripping around the country in long black Cadillacs. It is understood that this seem­ing inaction is the result of advice to NAACP leaders from political advisers in Washington who sense that there is a rumbling sound in the South which just possibly ~~~da~0 ~~c~0 of0t~! ~~~t!~~a~~:~~ plot. Stalin Told the World What Diplomacy Means to the Reds Before our diplomats humiliated themselves and their country by going to Geneva to confer with the Russians, they knew full well that any promises the Bolsheviks made would have no more sub­stance than a puff of smoke in a whirlwind .. If they are tempted to make ~n{ r!f~~~~ :!~~~~~e~{ ~~iJo~~~~ Stalin which expresses Moscow's idea of diplomacy then, now and forever: "Words must have no relations to actions-otherwise what kind of diplomacy is it? Words are one ~~~X~ ar~c!i~!sk ~~~~~~~eal~~~~ of bad deeds. Sincere diplomacy is no more possible than dry wa:.. ter or wooden iron". Ministerial Mission to Moscow Set for March 9 1 The next Mission to Moscow will consist of an eight-member delega­tion of American Protestant lead­ers from the National Council of Churches of Christ who will make the ten-day pilgrimage to the So­viet Republic next month, accord­ing to an Associated Press release from New York. It is to be the first part of a two-way exchange and Coinmu­nist- dominated churchmen of Rus­sia are expected to return the visit next June, it is understood. Since leading figures in the Council have taken the position that there is a similarity between Communism and Christianity and some have replaced the Bible with the Manifesto as the basis of their texts, it is not clear whether the delegation is going to take Chris­tianity to Russia or bring Commu­nism back to the United States. It is possible that the long-range pur­pose of the exchange visits is to weld the two directly opposite be­liefs into one universal Social Gos­pel adapted to the proposed One World of the future to which the Council, along with Russia, is com­mitted. The date for the departure of the pilgrimage has been set for March 9, bu~ we are sure that the fact that our b irthday h appens to be that same day, h ad nothing to do with fixing the date. We don't know how it is else­where but in the South Negroes have a wholesome contempt for white people who try to get famil­iar with them and put themselves on the same social level. Among themselves, they refer to such peo­ple, and very properly, as "white trash." J. Edgar Hoover's FBI did a magnificent ;ob in solving the case of the Brinks robbery and proved once again how effective­ly this great organization oper­ates in running down criminals ~oho steal, commit murder and other crimes. If we only had a similar set-up whose job wa& to expose theft of taxpayers money by politicians and run down those who steal our Constitutional liber­ties and States Eights, what a wonderful safeguard it would be. In replying to Senator Eastland's comment on the fact that the President's grandchildren h a d been taken out of an uinte­grated" school and placed in a private academy, James C. HageT-ifr:~: t~:;~he;r~Xdc~Jd;~nget i~~~ Fo0!~~~cw ey~~ul~ejt;::¥~~~gtoa ~~: what his opinion is of Presidents who play politics with other peo­ple's grandchildren in order to gain votes for the Party. Little Camp Fire Girls are given this verse to memorize as part of the Camp Fire "Credo": "I be­lieve in the new womanhood which combines the beauty of the old womanhood with citizen­ship and social consciousness.11 What are these tots to think this strange .mumbo jumbo means and, ~~~ do~~titdc::'e~nt~n~r~~otas~~~ ped it in? One Good Socialist Lauds ·Another Richard Neuberger, one of Oregon's two Socialist senators paid a "tribute" to his colleague Wayne Morse recently on the floor of the Senate. This "tribute" consisted of reading a blurb from an Oregon labor sheet called Labor's Daily in which it was claimed that Oregon Democrats en­joyed full power in the United States Senate for the first time in forty years and that this power was granted them when Morse shifted to the Dem-ocratic side. Wayne Morse didn't "shill" to any­thing. He has always been a. Social­ist and all he did was jUst stand still and both the Democratic and Republican parties "shifted" to him. The Corpus Christi, Texas, Times suggested editorially that the Texas Constitution should be amended and brought up to date "in one fell swoop". We wish to remind the Times that there is not enough statesmanship among all Texas politicians combined to re-write a document fashioned by early Texas patriots, in one fell swoop or any other kind of swoop. And this goes for the politicians in most States and certainly in Washington. Any Constitution amended or re-written now would emerge, after the school and church politicians got in their two cents worth, as a document sole­ly designed for the protection of ft~;::~~ts~n~n~~b~;J~~~s\vn;i~O:d better let our Constitutions, State and National, alone until we have a new cr op of statesmen with some understanding of fundamental principles and who are endowed with a more generous rupply of patriotism and common horse sense than now prevails. It is not only un-constitutional but plain, downright criminal for the Congress of the United States to give even a penny of American taxpayers' money to foreign coun­tries but since they have done it, regardless, just think how much they could have done for their own country while they were throwing billions around. If they were going to engage in un-con­stitutional spending of money that belonged to the people, why didn't they give it away or spend it here at home? For the billions we have given to foreigners who never in­tend to pay it back, they not only could have built up our military strength to the point where no country would have dared attack us but they could have irrigated the American desert from Texas to California and made ft blossom li~e . a rose, and, incidentally, eltmmated the "farm problem" in Western United States and pre­ve~ ted drouth-suffering ranchers from heavy losses, as well as re­claiming milliOns of acres of arid land. The Supreme Court is going to pass on the right-to-work l-aws of the various States. Watch for an­other blow to the Constitution and the Rights of States. Dr. Herbert B. Nelson, head of English Department at Oregon State College tested last year's English class of 1800 freshmen by giving them the same English exam that was given in 1927. Re­sults: The freshmen of 28 years ago were far the best spellers and knew more about formal grammer. February, 1956 Terror ·in the Northern Cities (From the News and Courier, Charleston, S.C., Jan. 30, 1956.) Philadelphia - the City of Broth­erly Love - is beset by youthful savages. The streets of America's third largest city are not fit for decent women. These remarks are not The News and Courier's, or any Southern prop­agandist's. We are quoting phrases from an editorial in The Evening Bulletin, which nearly everybody - The Bulletin advertises - reads in Philadelphia. Whence come these savages? Have the Indians left their reservations? Are they members of that tribe in Ecuador who ltiUed the five mission­aries? We have searched The Bul­letin's editorial in vain for a clue. The editorial describes in detail an attack by four boys on a student nurse. They waylaid her in a subway entrance as she was returning at 9 p.m. to her dormitory. They beat and robbed her. She fought with the pack for half an hour before a passerby frightened them away. Somehow, the boys were caught. Three other wom­en identified some or ali of them as having attacked them. "r!ahdes af~~~~c~v:::sda;~; ot~:r11=~~';; attacks by youthful savages." So this is nothing new. The editorial we have quoted was mailed to us by a resident of Phila­delphia with a batch of other clip­pings from the Philadelphia press. Most of the news stories did not identify the race of the assailants. Our Philadelphia informant, however penciled in the margin that they were Negroes. From Washington, Newark and New York we have received similar batches of clippings about violent crimes. The criminals in these stories likewise were identified by the send­er as Negroes. Though t he newspapen of large cities usually omit the race angle, close readers apparently find ways, perhaps by street addresses, of identifying Negroes. In Chicago, The Daily News re­ported a reign of terror on Chicago streets. ChurcheS in some districts no longer dare to hold night meetings. People are not safe after dark. The same situation may exist - we have been told it does - in other large cities of the North and West that have acquired Negro populations. From California, we have word - in a private letter - . from a former school teacher that non-segregated schools have encouraged racial mixing among youths that is abhorrent in the South. Segregation in the South at least has prevented terrorism in cities. Crime exists, of course, but nothing like these reports from Northern cities. Undisciplined packs roam their streets. In the South we have no packs of savages. Though Negroes are more numerous, they are better be­haved. Yes, and more CIVILIZED! They stay to themselves. They recog­nize and accept the limits set up for themselves and for white people. Both races respect those limits, and it is the exception that proves the rule. Released suddenly from social re­strictions of the segregation code, Ne~ groes are running wild in the North. This is what the North would inflict on a far greater scale on the people of the South. Republican Congressman A. L. Miller of Nebraska said in a press in~erview recently that his party wtll lose the election if Eisen­~ ower is not a candidate. If that tS true, his party is a very weak structure and not only deserves to lose the election but it should be. completely liquidated and re· budt on the principles that pre­~ atled before it was Socialized, 3ust as the Democratic party was similarly perverted. February, 1956 THE SOUTHERN CONSERVATIVE Page 1 _], Interposition Has Been Employed AnAppealforSanityandActionWhichShould Successfully on Many Occasions Transcend all Differences in Religious Faith As was to be expected, the left­wing fraternity has set out to dis­credit the plan of interposition by the States as a legal method of com­batting the Supreme Court's attempts to nullify· the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution by judicial ruling, One of the first columnists to fall Jn line was Martin S. Hayden who incorrectly stated in his column that interposition had been tried only one time and failed. He quoted Edwin S. Corwin, a former Princeton Univer­sity law professor a.!!l authority. Former State ~enator Robert A. Stuart of Fort Worth who has prob­ably spent more time in serious study of the American Constitution than a dozen left-wing university professors put together has answered the Hayden column in an effort to correct its misrepresentation. Senator Stuart's reply which has been widely distributed in the South is given below: I can not refrain from challenging the false impression left by the col­umn of Martin S. Hayden of Jan. 19. In this article Hayden states that "interposition" is simply an expres­sion of public opinion with about as much legal effect as a similar opinion expressed in the course of a barroom argument, and that Madison back­tracked on his position as to interposi­tion. If Hayden had sought to be fair he might have quoted that great Vir­ginian, Thomas Jefferson: "To give the general government the final and exclusive right to judge of its powers is to make its discretion, and not the Constitution, the measure of its powers" and that "in all cases of compact between the parties having no common judge, each party has an equal right to judge for Itself as well of the infraction as of the mode and measure of redress." Georgia was the first state to inter­pose and nullify the act of the federal government in a suit against the State of Georgia. This mere opinion in 1792 was so effective that three-fourths of the states joined Georgia and thereby brought about the enactment of the 11th Amendment to our Constitution. The opinion expressed by Kentucky ad Virginia in 1798, by way of Inter­position in the federal government alien and sedition act, brought about the elimination of the obnoxious pro­visions of the act as to freedom of speech and of the press. This was more than a barroom argument. The most effective of all nullifica­tion acts was in 1832 when South Carolina made the federal government back down on federal tariff laws that would have brought ruin and chaos to South Carolina. John C. Calhoun led this fight in which the Legislature of South Caro- A former school teacher in South Carolina sends us this one: Early In 1952 as possible presi­dential nominations were being discussed, two Negro women were giving their view.s. One of them said to the other: ur sho don't want that Adeline Steven­son to get it 'cause I don't believe ~~eno ~~:an r~~~:;re~e:~;· a;~ mouth, gal. Adeline ain't no Woman; he a man. The only woman runnin' for president is that Miss Esther Key Fauver of Tennessee". From a judge of a Mississippi court: "In my opini,on, your paper Is one of the finest published In the South or, for that matter, in this nation and your courage and determination merit the sincerest acclaim by constitutional Ameri­cans". lina said: "The Constitution of the United States is, in fact, a compact to which each state is a party in the character already described, and in the case of deliberate, palpable and dangerous exercise of power not del­egated the~ have the right, in the last resort, to Interpose for arresting the progress of the evil." The right of interposition has been exercised upon seven different occa­sions and by 11 different states most of which were north of the Mason­Dixon line. It was last exercised by Iowa in 1880, in which the Supreme Court was forced to backtrack on its deci­sion holding that the granting of vast tracts of land by the State of Iowa to railway companies to be unlaw­ful. Mor~ than 7~ years have passed since mterposihon has been exer­eised by any state. That is why the present generation does not know the meaning of "interposition." This does not mean that it should not have been used many times in this cen­tury. U it had been used to stop the income tax amendment or to stop the 80-20 legislation by the federal government as to estate tax, perhaps more of our state sovereignties would have been preserved. It could. have applied to our tideland question and is especially needed to block the U.N. from d~troying the sovereignty of all of the 48 states. In arriving at an opinion as to the right of interposition, you have only to ask yourself: '·Is ours a federal or a constitutional republic? A constitu­tional republic or an absolute govern­ment? Is it a government based upon the unrestrained discretion of the fed­eral government?" There is little doubt as to the right of the Southern states to maintain their position that the U.S. Supreme Court has no constitutional right to say what kind of education for its children should be maintained by each state or that, socially, it can force the whites to attend schools with the blacks or the blacks to at­tend schools with the whites so as to bring about the mongrelization of the ,races aa laid down by the CommUnist manifesto. If Hayden had taken time to read Edward Samuel Corwin'• book pub­lished in 1935, entitled "Twilight of the Supreme Court,'' instead of taking a quotatibn from Madison, he would have found that neither Corwin nor the Supreme Court agree4 with him that President Madison had back­tracked or changed his opinion. He was quoted as a Federalist until his dying day by Corwin in lbe chapter entiUed "Federalism vs. National­ism." Paul H. Hug.,es not only made laughing stock of such suckers C13 Joseph L. Rauh, Jr. of ADA, the editors of the Washington Post, Telford Taylor and others, by taking them for thousands of dol­lars on the pretense of delivering non-existent documents to them, but he serves the good purpose of illustrating the type of scoundrel which was back of the Commu­nist effort to uget Joe". A character named Emil Mazey, secretary-treasurer of the United Auto Workers in Grand Rapid$, :fa~~ii"a: E~~~::d ~~a~.nf.~n;::;; should be ousted from the Senate and Mississippi placed under ufed­eral trusteeship" because East­land Is leading the fight again!! un-constitutional and humiliating decisions of the Supreme Court· And still there are those who in­sist that UAW is not pro-Commu~ nist. The Rt. Rev. William C. Mc­Grath, noted Catholic Bishop who, in a recent article widely published both in Canada and the United States, warned that we faced Red enslavement within a period of from ten to fifteen years, has now revised his estimate. The interna­tionally- renowned churchman now believes that the zero hour is much The bewildered, frustrated, lead­erless millions on the North Am­erican Continent are no match for the closely-knit, relentlessly train­ed, diabolically-led and utterly ruthless minority who are deter­mined to take us overJ Msgr. Mc­Grath charges in his latest discus­sion of the subject, and warns that nothing short of a miracle of Di­vine intervention can now save us from destruction. "I am not 'debating' the point and the time is past for contro­versy," he asserts. "For those who are aware of the frightening pro­gress of treason and betrayal in recent years, no argument will be necessary. Wjth those whose minds have been dulled and stupefied by the 'falsehood serum' of Pollyanna liberalism, argument is a precious waste of time. "This Inside story of the twitfght of American freedom has been re­vealed to me by top-ranking ex­perts on Communist subversion, all of whom have just about thrown up , their hands in despair. "When we say that nothing short of a miracle can save us, we are not discounting the efficacy of human endeavor. It is not that nothing human can be done. It is that noth­ing really effective wlll be done. "The Lord helps those who help themselves. He expects us to make use of our God-given intelligence and one great human effort, under God, might still turn the tide. "If the more than 160,000,000 Americans who loathe and abhor Communism could be galvanized into concerted action the picture could change over night. Under a supreme command of competent leadership these millions of people could still save the day. "But that con£erted action will never materialize because, lor one thing, the millions of bewildered people are too hopelessly divided among themselves. "Today, in high places, in aca­demic circles especially, the 'liberal' • mind holds sway Even among Cath­olic editors, who might at least be expected to know better, there is anything but unanimity on this Mr. Bascom Timmons is a calm, thoughtful and analytical Wash­ington newspaper man whose column is always readable, in­teresting and to the point. Con­cerning Russia's lend-lease debt of $11,000,000,000 to the United States, not one thin dime of which she has ever paid, Mr. Timmons said in his column recently: uThe origin of lend-lease was an agree­ment reached between Prime Minister Churchill and President Roosevelt in 1940 before the United States entered World War II, which was described by Roose­velt with a statement; 'When your neighbor's house is on fire, you lend him your hose and when the fire is out, he gives it back'". But the Russians haven't returned even the nozzle, Mr. Timmons pointed out. most crucial question of sheer sur­vival. "I know of at least four Catholic magazines whose editorialli and ar­ticles continue to grind out the lib­eral theme song that there is really no need for concern: that only the alarmists are crying wolf: that the Communist menace js grossly exag­gerated (1,000,000,000 enslaved hu­mans notwithstanding); that the 'answer' lies in our steadfast de­termination never to take a strong and uncompromising stand, regard­less of insult and provocation and - this above all - in craven, crawling appeasement on our part at Genevas and still more Gen­evas that bid fare to endure in abiding futility till the crack of a not~too-distant doom." . "Once alerted, millions of hither­to inarticulate slaves-to-be could swing into immediate action. A 100,000 telegrams, 50,000,000 let­ters could deluge President and Senate and Congress, serving no­tice that, at long last, we have had our fill of this sickening orgy of betrayal; that 165,000,000 Amer­icans do not propose to be enslaved by 50,000 die hard Communists and a few hundred thousand wild-eyed fellow travelers. "We outnumber them about 300 to one yet that fanatical never­say- die minority sends more pro­tests and recommendations to Wash- • ington in the course of a year than the rest of the Country in a life­time. "Subjects to be investigated would include the "impending" recognition of Red China, already 'in the bag' if nothing is done; the Bricker Amendment, if it is not already too late; the breaking olf of relations with Soviet Russia; the fluoridation of water , placing entire cities at the mercy of one man who could turn a valve, step up the proportion of rat poison in vital water supplies and "stupefy" entire populations (as they have stupefied entire "colonies" h1 con­centration camps) when the Ume is ripe lor Operation Take-Over. "These are but a few of the vital issues on which Americans feel strongly today, without organ­ized and effective means o! self expression. Other questions could be considered as they arose. Instead of being a helpless, befuddled flock of innocent lambs awaiting slaughter the American people - could stand up and fight while they can still call their souls their own, or partly their own; they could become, for a change, an articulate majority, serving notice upon our legislators and the plotters behind the scenes that we do not propose to sit idly by while the last vestige of freedom vanishes lrom the face of the earth." There is a law on the statute books of Texas which has never been repealed that prohibits in­tegrated public meetings between Negroes and white people. Lately there have been meetings in sev· eral large cities attended by N e­groes and a few white people. In such cases both white and colored are guilty of law violation, and the officials who permit it should be removed from office. One of the silliest suggestions t 1. yet made by racial deviates con· cerning "integration" is that small children should be the first to be uintegrated" on the ground that they won't object. Of course they won't object. Neither will a baby object if a rattlesnake should be placed in its crib. It would try to play with the snake, because a baby or small child is trusting and doesn't realize that there are grown-ups who would deliberate· ly put it in positions of danger. Communists Score Victory In the Dallas Art Battle The Dallas County Patriotic Council, American Legion, Pro America, Dallas Public Affairs Luncheon Club, Federation of Dallas artists and a half dozen other representative groups of leading citizens there have been carrying on a running battle with the Dallas Museum of Fine Arts for many months. The trouble arose over the high regard of Museum officials for the works of Communist artists which have continued to adorn the walls of the institution re­gardless of strong and bitter pro­tests of local groups and individu­als who have no special love for Lenin and his ideological disciples. Dallas has some financially powerful folks who wield great influence in the North Texas me­tropolis ; in fact some vulgar peons even claim that these gents run the town. They also insist that if certain lads in this group have any particular antagonism toward Communists or Communism, it is a well-guarded secret. Any way, when the matter came to a show-down recently, the Commies won hands down. Museum heads announced to all and sundry that the artistic offer­ings of the Reds were going to stay right there on the walls and implied that if patriotic citizens didn't like it, they could lump it- If 11art is a weapon" as the Communists claim, then the Dal­las Museum of Fine Arts doesn't jntend to be caught unarmed. Truman Breaks Out With More Memoirs The little man from Independence has broken out with another rash of memoirs in Life Magazine. Read­ing them, one is undecided whether to rage in anger or weep in pity for the cocky Pendergast protege who struggled futilely for seven long years with problems so palpably beyond his understanding. Displaying the full measure of ego­tism and bravado which God some­' imes accords small men to compen­sate them for lack of stature, Truman continues to point out how right he _ always was and how wrong everybody else. Looking over his cabinet in retro­spect he sees George Marshall as "one of the greatest living Americans," Tom Clark as "a great Attorney Gen­e1 ·al" and Dean Acheson as one of our "truly great Secretaries of State" and, by Truman standards, . perhaps they were all that. From the viewpoint of a gnat, a horse-fly assumes the proportions of an Olympian god and in the purview of a tadpole, a bull frog looms as a monster of gargantuan size. His naive statement about the China sell-out would be laughable except that it differs little from the attitude of many of the leaders which this nation has suffered in the past two decades: "There is no doubt in my mind that if Chiang Kai-Shek had been a little more conciliatory, an under­standing cou1d have been reached." He is so right. "Conciliation" is all it takes to get along with the Com­munists, but Chiang Kai-Shek doesn't conciliate easy. He seems to have that quality so lacking in modern leaders - he is loyal to his own country alone and does not feel the slightest concern for Communists or their well-being, and he does not bend backward seeking Russia's "friend­ship and good will" that non-existent will-a-the-wisp which motivates prac­tically every move made in Washing­ton. THE SOUTHERN CONSERVATIVE "Rock 'N Roll" New State Department Policy as Our Hep Cats of Culture Swing and Sway With the Reds Life Magazine whose writers get so emotionally upset when dis­cussing the HNegro problem" of the South that they have to sit right down on the curb and cry, let out all the stops in their January 9 edition with a tear-jerking account of our recent "cultural" invasion of Russia at 'state Department expense. It develops that there has been set up within this Federal agency something that might be loosely termed a sort of cui tural lend-lease program in which we propose to share our surplus artistic commodities with the Russians and others to impress them with the high cultural standards prevailing in the United States. In keeping with this program, the State Department selected an all-Negro road show as typical of American culture and true exponents of American art and sent them on a luxurious tour which included Russia, with the Department's blessing and all expenses paid. Members of this company who have been publicly lauded by Presi­dent Eisenhower as uambassadors of the arts" were given seven pages of Life's valuable space, with photographs and write-ups depicting their playful antics during their leisure hours if!. the U.S.S.R. Some of Stalingrad's gentry is shown stolidly watching a demon­stration of "American culture" in which a big black boy heaves a cow­size Russian woman through the air while giving her lessons in the lofty and exalted art of jitterbugging, American style. From the sidelines, bearded Bolsheviks peered curiously at the strange goings-on, but who is there to say that this democratic expres­sion of American art didn't penetrate the rough exterior of these im­passive old boys and inspire within them a secret longing to go cultural themselves and start shaking a wicked leg? Alter all, art is a powerful propaganda weapon according to the Russians' own code, so who knows but what such artistic American conceptions as the Shimmy, Shag, Samba, Jive and Jitterbug may not yet bridge the wide gap of misunderstanding between us and forge a strong link of amity, friendship and good will? Getting further into the spirit of the thing, we may even find it advisable to reach back into the past and send them the Charleston, the Bunny Hug and the Black: Bottom. Any way, we goofed at Geneva, so maybe this is it. Other "cultural" performances of the cast in their off-show hour~ consisted of a jam session in a Stalingrad hotel dining room in which the visiting "ambassadors of the arts" took over the orchestra, jumped on the tubs and made with live jive. Surrendering the saxophone back to its owner, the star of the show then wowed the Commies and put 'em in the aisle when he leaped through the air in an unforgettable rendi­tion of a classic American hep step. But the Cossacks' final concession to American cultural supremacy was undoubtedly cinched somewhat later when the entire cast dropped down on their knees on a marble floor and gave the culture-starved Russians a touching and jnimitable version of an American crap game, to the plaintive accompaniment of such esthetic expressions as "eighter from Decatur", "seven, come eleven", and "little Joe from Kokomo". Obviously the Leningrad citizenry was literally dripping with cul­ture as the troupe said a tearful farewell and, according to Life's ac­count of the affair, the parting was such sweet sorrow that practically everybody was crying in their vodka as the "ambassadors of the arts" packed their culture kits and moved on to indoctrinate Moscow with the State Department's conception of Arrierican art. Truly the article is valuable and revealing in that it gives the American taxpayers factual information and a better understanding of the wise and prudent manner jn which the federal government spends their money. Authenticity of the article is vouched for by the fact that Life Magazine, too, is subsidized by the State Department and sent all over the world as one of the cultural "Voices of America.'' It is only when a great family magazine of true Americanism such as Life reminds us that we are privileged to subsidize some real cool cats who can ''send" the Soviets, flip their wigs and make the joint jump, that we can really appreciate how fortun_ate we ar_e in being allowed to work hard, deny ourselves and pay high taxes m order to ship such missions as this abroad to inspire other countries to a higher cultural level. 'l'he United Nations is the big­gest Fifth Column in the world, Lord Beaverbrook, English pub­lisher on a visit here last month said. "You Americans spend huge sums of money fighting the Fifth Column in your country but at the same time down on the East side of New York, you've erected the biggest Fifth Co!umn headquar­ters in the world. It is filled with men who wish to subvert the American government". William Zeckendorf who recent­ly purchas"d a large· tract of land between Fort Worth and Dallas for the development of an ~<industrial empire" was given much publicity by the press of the two cities- None of them however reported that he was an agent for the Rockefellers and that he was the one who bought the land on which the United Nations is located, acting merely in the capacity of a go­between for the Rockefellers, who contributed it to the one-world United Nations. February, 1956 Noted Texan Discusses 'Farm Problem' With No Holds Barred Mr. J. Evetts Haley of Canyon is a Texan of many attainments and highly respected throughout the State. An educator, lecturer, ranchman and stockgrower, his public utterances are generally regarded as representative of the sentiments of the responsible element o! the State. In a recent communication to Hon­orable Leonard Hall, Chairman of the Republican National Committee, Mr. Haley said· As a Democrat who actively cam­paigned for Ike under the desperate hope rather than the firm conviction that he was honest. this Texas cow­puncher, barely making an unsubsid­lzed living from the dusty soil, feels moral compulsion to open confession and to protest. In his farm message the President tried to soothe the seething rural re­sentment by saying he offers noth­ing "specious'' as a pal1iative. Then why not be honest with those hard­pressed people who live upon the soil by frankly telling them that the fundamental cause of their troubles is this very government meddling and muddling, this planning and these controls, that he proposes to extend, amplify, and perpetuate. Hazy Henry Wallace's unqualified stamp of approval on the President and his plan now plainly brands both man and plan for what they are. Wal­lace, his communist friends and his fellow travelers have not changed; their plans and programs have not changed; and Ike and his governing ilk have not changed! Some anguished conservatives sure­ly will shout: "Do you want to go back to 'Red Herring Harry' and to 'Addled" Adlai, as though this versa­tile and gifted land had no other re­course! But even that desperate re­sort would have the virtue o! clarify­ing and joining the issue - that is, constitutional liberty versus commu­nistic controls. Better an open, hon­est fight than continuance of this sham, hypocritical battle. Meanwhile, try as it may, a gener­ally favorable and pliable press can­not obscure the gathering storm. It is time to pitch out the polls and poke into the grass-roots. The sig­nificant truth is seeping up from the honest earth. The South and the Farmbelt are disillusioned. Let these hyphenated Republicans who first picked Ike trot him out again, and their education will be completed without resort to Federal subsidy. And to prove, as his propagandists claim, that he really is "the soul of candor," put his enthusiastic endorser, Henry Wallace, in second place on the ticket with him. That would really be coming clean with the American public, and would retire him for the needed rest to the coun­try at Gettysburg, and at least expose him to the memories ol a spot hal­lowed by the blood of men who died for American nationalism. A Tragedy That Might Have Been Averted The tragedy in which four Amer­ican missionaries were murdered by savage Indians in the Equadorean jungle last month was so unnecessary, in our opinion. These good men were warned of the danger repeatedly and knew that they might meet the very fate that befell them. There are no tribes of head shrink­ers in this country as the savage tribe who did them in was called, but there is an awful lot of work that mission­aries could do in reconverting some Americans to Christianity who have forsaken the Christian faith in favor of the Communist Social Gospel. If these poor men had only confined their efforts to their own country where their services were badly need­ed, they would still be alive.
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