Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
The Southern Conservative, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1954
File 001
File size: 5.40 MB
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
The Southern Conservative, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1954 - File 001. 1954-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 14, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/southern/item/1147/show/1138.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1954-02). The Southern Conservative, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1954 - File 001. The Southern Conservative. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/southern/item/1147/show/1138

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Southern Conservative, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1954 - File 001, 1954-02, The Southern Conservative, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 14, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/southern/item/1147/show/1138.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title The Southern Conservative, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1954
Contributor
  • Darden, Ida M.
Publisher Southern Conservative
Date February 1954
Language English
Subject
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
Place
  • Fort Worth, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 10604411
Collection
  • Houston Metropolitan Research Center
  • Ida M. Darden Collection
  • The Southern Conservative
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Houston Metropolitan Research Center.
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript THE SOUTHERN CONSERVATIVE -To Plead for a Return of Constitutional Government- Vol. 5 Fort Worth, Texas, February, 1954 No. 2 Experts in United Nations Invade the Maternity Ward President Has No Authority to Interfere In Passage of Constitutional Amendments If we needed additional proof of the dis tance we have travelled away from orderly processes of American government and vio­lated the intent of its founders , we had it as the original Bricker ame ndment was considered by the Senate. While this body was absorbed in its deliber ations of a subject coming strictly within its province and which lay outside of Execu­tive j urisdiction, couriers were scurrying in and out of the White House and the State Department and ricocheting back to Capitol Hill, armed with suggestions and demands from the president. All this extra-curricular activity was inspired by the mistaken be­lief of the president that he is authorized to interfere, consult and advise on the passage of an amendment to tht! Constitution of the United States which is defi­ni tely not the case. Those who wrote the Constitu­tion took care of this. or thought they did, when they withheld from the president any responsibility in the matter and allowed h im no vote, no voice and no veto in con­nection with the submission and r atification of an amendment to that document. All that is requ ired of the P resi­dent in such matters is a dign ified and aloof silence and hands-off policy. leaving the legislative body to perform its legitimate functions without interference by the Execu­tive, in accordance with provisions in the Constitution which specify three separate a n d distinct branches of government, with overlapping authority granted to none. Warning Voice From Beyond the Grave John Stuart· Mill, English philosopher and economist, could have no more effectively pled for the passage of the original Bricker amendment if he had been standing on the floor of the United States Senate recently, than he offered in his Essay on Representative Government published in 1860. In that Essay written almost a century ago, he used these words which are so tragically appropriate in this country now: "A few people may prefer a free government but if, from indulgence or carelessness, or cowardice, or want of public spirit, they are unequal to the exertions necessary for preserv­ing it; if they will not fight for it when it is directly attacked, if they can be deluded by the artifices used to cheat them out of it; if, for momentary discouragement, or temporary panic, or fit of enthusiasm for an individual, they can be induced to lay their liberties at the feet of even a great man, or trust him with the powers which enable him to subvert their institutions; in all these cases they are more or less unfit for liberty; and even though it may be for their good to have had it even for a short time, they are unlikely long to enjoy it". W hen the Master Minds of the Universe solemnly as­semble under the benign auspices of a world organization and concentrate the mighty force of their combined intellects on the solution of international problems, anything can hap· pen. There is no maHer too persona/ and intimate for them to tackle, no proposal to~ ridiculous for them to offer and no heights of absurdity which they do not sea/e. But we contend that the International labor Organization of United Nations gets the velvet-lined brass knucks for including childbirth as one of the forms of "labor" coming within their jurisdiction. The International Labor Organization, known alphabetically as ILO, and which is one of the most aggressive sub-divisions of United Nations, held a meeting sometime ago to take up consideration of a matter which forcefully il1ustrates what they consider "pressing world problems" requiring international debate. At this meeting, the intellectuals in attendance pulled up their chairs. hitched up their pants, sat down at the Council table and un­leashed their powerful minds for the attack on the subject before them. This particular " pressing world problem", which had caused in­ternational authorities from many lands to assemble in solemn conclave. was the matter of women having babies and what World Government should do about it. Of course we can't escape the indisputable fact that "labor" is .heavily involved in this process of nature but most of us didn't know before that this particular type was subject to Union rules, hours and rates of pay. Anyway, the bright boys in ILO proposed a "convention" to be adopted by the United Nations under which women would be financial­ly remunerated for bringing forth their young- •omething they have been doing free throughout the ages without realizing that they could get paid for it. At this point, we feel that it is only fair to warn that vast hordes of women who were born too soon to get in on the act will probably descend on the United Nations in droves with the demand that this provision be made retroactive. Just think, for instance. how much dough Mrs. Dionne might have hauled down if motherhood had been operating on a cash basis in 1934 when her five little bundles from heaven came rolling off the assembly line. This "convention" as finally approved takes in only employed women but, since the ultimate intent of United Nations is to take the whole world into protective custody, the program will probably be expanded to include all feminine humanity when World Government squares off and gets going in a big way. Under the provisions of this "convention" a woman would be given (Continued on Page Two) Millions of Americans Think It--The Southern Conservative Says It Pogo 2 As Usual He Didn't Mince Any Words Senator Joseph R. McCarthy added to his stature which already towers far above all of his detrac­tors and many of his colleagues when he was in San Francisco recently. His statement was in connection with complaints from Fair Deal Democrats that the Republicans were "pouring it on" in their charges o! Communist coddling on the part of the Truman adminis­tration. The president sided with the Fair Deal cry-babies and indicated that he would try to put a stop to criticism of Communist partisans who sold us out during both the Roosevelt and Truman administra­tions. Asked for comment by San · Francisco reporters, the Wisconsin senator replied with characteristic directness: HI shall continue to give the people the facts". Earlier he had correctly tagged the two previous national adminis­trations as Htwenty years of trea­son" and his reaction as tersely ex­pressed at San Francisco indicat­ed that he was not about to back up. No Place For Snappy Dressers In This Proposed Peace Plan An Associated Press dispatch from Allahabad, India, tells o! a novel proposal for peace originat ing in that dty. The proposal comes from the so,called Holy Men of India known as Naga Sadhus. It seems that a deep~seated belief prevailing among the Holy Men is that wars and all other ailments of the world are caused by the refusal of ordinary people to discard all earthly desires and possessions, in­cluding their clothes. So these Holy Men suggest that the remedy tor war lies in five of the world's top leaden getting together on top ol the Himalaya Mountains and working out a peace plan: They list these "top leaders" as Premier Nehru ol India, Prime Minister Winston Churchill of England, Georgi Malen­kov of Russia, Mao Tze~tung ol China and President Dwight D. Eisenhower ol the United States. The catch to the :!!luggestion of the Holy Men is that all the participants in the conference must appear at the tip ot the Himalayas in their birth­day clothe:!!. Without meaning any disrespect to the Holy Men, we make bold to sug­gest that if the world's leaders can't achieve peace while fully clothed and living in steam~heated buildings, we can see nothing to be gained by having them do a strip tease on top ol the Himalayas. Having proved by this bizarre sug­gestion that they stand high on the list of international screwballs, the Holy Men should get themselves ap­pointed as delegates to one of the United Nation's auxiliary units where such wacky proposals are all in the day's work. TH E SOUTH ERN CONS ERVATIVE February, 1954 Arkansas Senator Opposes Expose of Communists The Senate of the United States made an enviable record in its vole on the matter of giving to Senator Joseph R. McCarthy the funds to con· tinue his eUcctive fight against Com­munists in government. The amount requested by the Mc­Carthy Committee was $214,000 and that was exactly what it got. The vote 85 to 1, with Senator J. W. Fulbright of Arkansas voting against it. Just why the Arkansas senator is opposed to the exposure of Commu­nists who are strivina: for the over­throw of the government is anybody's guess, but we imagine many of his constituents will demand an answer. Fulbright, a Rhodes scholar, doesn't come up for re~election until 1956 and maybe he thinks the matter will be forgotten by then-and it probably will. A Prophet Is Not Without Honor Except at Home Wayne Morse who is reputed to be able to empty the Senate Chamber quicker than a fire drill by simply rising to his feet, was in Texas recently. At his talk to the Dallas Chapter of Americans for Democratic Action, he is reported to have commanded more respect than is accorded him by his colleagues on the floor of the Senate, as none ol the colored breth~ ren, who largely composed his audience, walked out on him. Fair Dealers Swallowing a Strain Whole at Cinat Herd of After Camels In our opinion the juicy morsels of scandal turned up in the latest Roosevelt divorce case, are over­shadowed by the amazing attitude of the National Democratic Com­mittee concerning this particular angle of a perpetual matrimonial tussle. The Committee sent Mrs. India Edwards and former California governor, Cuthbert Olsen, to whis­per in Jimmy's pink ear and warn him that the party would be "in­jured" if he made the race for Congress from California's 26th district, in view of the racy details outlined in his wife's suit against him. For a party whose top-ranking members have been involved in practically every crime in the calendar including bribery and plain theft, on up to conspiracy and treason, to fear "injury" by a normal little thing like a Roose­ ·Velt divorce scandal, would seem to be straining at a gnat after swallowing a whole herd of camels. Also, we think that James Roosevelt's contention that he signed a letter admitting miscon­duct in order to save his father humiliation, was a little far-fetch· ed, too. His old man had already weath· ered a half dozen divorces without any apparent jolt to his compla· cency and, in our opinion, it is not likely that an additional domestic brawl would have even jarred his cigarette holder from its custo­mary jaunty tilt. As between disturbing hIs father's unruffled composure or smearing the names of twelve women, our uns.olicited opinion is that he made a very ungallant choice. As to his wife's remarkable charges concerning his wholesale infidelity, we believe the figures are grossly exaggerated and that her evaluation of his prowess as a Casanova is based on highly in· flationary estimates. EXPERTS (Continued from Page One) time off from her job with full pay, together with a big cash bonus, in order to have her baby, the presumption being that she would be required to observe strict Union rules and an eight-hour per day schedule, with overtime if she didn't knock off promptly at five. After she had fulfilled what used to be considered her natural function bu t which now turns out to be a commercial t ransaction, and h ad enjoyed a three month's paid vacation , the mother would bring her baby back to the job where a nice, cozy government nursery would be waiting for it. (Just where her husband, if any, comes in and what he would be doing all this time was not indicated.) Oldtimcrs in Texas Jnsist that at an early session of the State Legis~ lature a bill was introduced, and seriously considered, which was de­signed to prevent jackasses from be­ing allowed to run at large over the State. After lengthly debate, the measure is reported to have been de­feated. Having satisfactorily settled this phase of a "pressing world problem" the intellectuals went on from there and took up the allied subject of feeding the baby and, since world experts are nothing if not Modern day Texans frequently efficient, they even specified the periods in which the mother would be have occasion for regret that the bill allowed to leave the job to nurse her baby. did not pass. The unanimous conclusion was that the baby's milk should be He Admires Originality In Villages but Not Men provided by the government and everybody was happy and felt that they had completed a good job well done until one of the experts sud· denly remembered that not all babies are fed on cow's milk. This called for another huddle after which, following deep, serious and profound deliberation, it was concluded that if the government The Right Honorable Al!red bought milk for bottle-fed babies, it would constitute rank discrimina­Robens, labor member of the British tion against the mother who produces her infant's nourishment by the Parliament, while on a trip to this "simple expedient of flipping a wrist and yanking a zipper. country 1·ecently, had the nerve to Since "discrimination" is a cardinal sin in the eyes of all experts, comment to reporters that his only this important angle of a 11pressing world problem" was resolved by the objection to the United States wa:!!l simple decision that the latter type of mother should be paid so much that all cities and towns here looked per gallon for the real McCoy, although it was not inade clear whether alike. or not the United Nations would provide meters or pressure gauges "Every villAge I have seen looks for measuring liquid in exact amounts when dispensed through just like the last one" he complained. nature's original pipe lines. This too from a Socialist Party Presumably left for future discussion was the world~shaking ;~m~';~o~:c~bj=~~v~oi~~:e:~~:~ question of what the United Nations would do in the event a mother, body by law to act and think alike! during one of these government-financed trips to attend her baby, Obviously he is in favor of unifying should find that an "emergency" existed which required her to render the human race but objects to any it an additional service not provided for in ILO general regulations. similarity between cities and towns. For a hundred and three-score years, the United States produced the statesmanship which enabled us to settle our own problems. formu .. A middle~o!-the-road philosophy late our own policies and provide for our own security without as. . ol government means less than noth­ing at all. It is merely a cloak for weakness, indecision and lack ol cour· age in squarely facing up to the issues confronting the Republic and solvin& them in the American way. It is an expedient eUort to appease both sides. Even an out-spoken "Lib­eral" is more deserving of respect than one who bas no convictions on anythlng. sistance or advice from alien egg heads. . It is the sincere conviction of unnumbered millions of good patriots in this country that we could still do it and that the job could be more successfully performed if we heeded mounting American senti .. ment and took the United States out of the United Nations and the United Nations out of the United States. A surprising number of us are also firmly convinced that Ameri· can women could even continue to have babies under the old-fashioned formula and that they could always manage, in a pinch, to struggle through the rigors of a blessed event without benefit of government supervision or the presence of world bureaucrats in the delivery room. February, 1954 THE SOUTHERN CONSERVATIVE Pago l The Still Small Voice of Conscience Those Will Whisper to Them of Their Guilt Democrats Were the - Days When Were Democrats "The dilapidated train pulled slowly away and twenty-one young Americans who had turned their backs on their own land to cast their lot with the Communists went North to hide forever beyond the Bamboo Curtain." This is from a press account of an American Tragedy which oc­curred when twenty-one young soldiers departed the land of their birth recently and accepted Com­munism as their chosen way of life, but it had its beginning more than twenty years ago when most of these boys were still in the cradle. Such an instance of mass trea~ son could have happened in no other era than one which saw na­tional political leadership and pri­vate morals sink to the lowest ebb in history. These boys had the misfortune to grow up in an age which wit­nessed widespread disloyalty in top government circles and one in which American traitors enjoyed White House protection; where teachers in educational institu .. tions held up Communism as a form of government superior to our own; where many ministers cleverly substituted the theories of Karl Marx for1 the gospel of Jesus Christ in their sermons from the pulpit; and where subversive speakers fanned out all over the nation, at the expense of large Foundations, to infiltrate impres­sionable young minds with sub­versive doctrines. Yes, these boys have "gone North" perhaps never to return and have left broken hearts in twenty-one American homes. But for every agonized heart­ache of a deserted American mother, there should be a thou­sand pangs of guilty conscience on the part of those still enjoying the glorious blessings of freedom who helped to sell these lads into eternal slavery, poverty and de­spair. Even though misguided, these boys had the courage of their con­victions and were willing to seek refuge in the land of their dreams while the cowardly traitors who pointed out the way to them pre­fer to remain here in prosperity and affluence and continue to instill their subversive theories into other young and immature minds. Oklahoma and Texas Editors Yet They Say There's Reprint Letter to Malenkov We are very gratei.ul to Mr. Richard Lloyd Jones editor of the Tulsa, Okla­homa, Tribune, who recently paid us a very gracious tribute. On February sixth, in an action which he assured . us was without precedent on the part of his paper, he surrendered his usual two column signed editorial space to our lead editorial which appeared in the January Edition ol. the Southern Con­servative titled "Open Letter to Malenkov'', Under the heading "Let Mrs. Dar­den Speak", the Tribune editor makes this flattering reference to our work: "From the Flatiron Building ln Fort Worth, Texas, comes a vital opinion paper edited by Mrs. Ida M. Darden. Its subscription price is l.ive dollars per year. It is worth every penny ol it. We give it this plug because noth4 ing like it comes to .. our editorial table. "It makes the pretentious eastern seaboard newspaper and magazine editors look like the inconsequential little chaps that they are. "Today we vacate our editorial chair to invite Mrs. Darden to sit df)WO. She addresses an open letter to Georgi Malenkov ol. the Kremlin". There followed the major part of the above mentioned editorial ol ours and we .feel that this generous act of the Tribune editor will win many friends lor our paper among those who feel as we do about the State of the Union, among the people of Oklahoma. Likewise, we are indebted to Mr. M. I. Hall, editor ol the Lubbock, Texas, Sunday Sun who ran the edi­torial in its entirety in their edition of January 17th with this explanation for devoting an entire page to our three-thousand word letter to Malen­kov: "The facts published in this letter Nothing in a Name When an effort was made to fire United States Employes in the United Nations sometime ago be­cause they refused to tell an in­vestigating committee of Congress whether or not they were Com4 munists, it was discovered that this country had no authority in the matter. Something called the United Nations Administrative Tribunal reversed the order to fire them and. instead, reinstated some of them and awarded large sums of money to eleven others. From a report of the Internal Subcommittee of the Committee on Judiciary of the United States Senate, we have just learned the names of the governing officials in this United Nations AdminisC trative Tribunal, which took so much authority on itself. The president of it is named Madame Bastid. The vice president of it is a Mr. Crook. Birds of a Feather: Eric John· ston, president of the Motion Pic­ture Association of America, gave a party recently at which Dave Beck of the Teamsters Union was the honoree. Earl Warren, the president's amazing selection as Supreme Court Chief Justice, headed the guest list. are painfully embarrassing to us as a nation. It is human nature to hate to admit that o·ur trust has been mis­placed to so great an extent. But we need to face the facts and appreciate the opportunity to present to our readers so forceful a protest ol our betrayal". Florida Senator Protests Disgusting Order by Navy Senator Spessard Holland o! Flor­ida has demanded an explanation of In 1887 when Congress passed a bill for relief ol certain drouth~ stricken counties in Texas, and made an appropriation for this purpose, President Grover Cleveland, the last real Democrat to serve as Chief Ex­ecutive of the United States, vetoed the Navy Department for the l.iring it. of thirty white civilian barbers at the .;racksonville Naval Air Station because they refused to shave Negro sailors. "It is difficult to understand why the Navy is forcing such an explosive issue that flies in the lace of age-old customs and conventions in the Jacksonville area, particularly where equal facilities and service, il not better, have been provided at the same places" Senator Holland said. From Senator Holland's report of the affair, it pppears that the barber shops had Negro operators to serve Negro customers but this was un­acceptable to Navy of!icials who ordered white men to personally shave Negroes. If Federal officials insist on con­tinuing to force indignities on white Southern Americans, they- are liable to bring about, not the Moscow-in~ spired integration program politi­cians so glibly mutter about, but the return of an institution in the South which has become little more than a memory. And that would be very bad. People Who Live In Cilass Houses We believe that the ultimate in inconsistency was reached recent~ ly when members of an election board from Kansas City, of all places, came down to Dallas and -believe it or not-criticized the manner in which Dallas County officials handle their ballot boxes. It seems that in Dallas, the vot­ing boxes are stored in warehouses when not in use and the Jackson County, Missouri, gents claimed that this causes these sacred con4 tainers of the citizens ballot to become rusty which, they assert, is wanton destruction of property. Of course up in Kansas City they have superior methods for protecting the ballot boxes which keep them shiny and bright. The...first step in this process as practiced in the immaculate pre­cincts of Pendergast's former em­pire, is to remove the contents of the boxes and burn them, the bet­ter to keep the boxes brightly polished, as well as to prevent some snooping investigator from having a look. As in many similar cases of saboteurs, Harry Dexter White was born with one name and died with another. His real name was not White at all but Weit and his father and mother were Lithuan· ians named Jacob and Sara Weit. In returning the measure without his approval, President Cleveland made what was one ol the last sound statements ever to be uttered by a president claiming adherence to that political faith, from that time until this good hour: "I can find no warrant for such an appropriation in the Constitution, and I do not believe that the power and duty of the general government ought to be extended to the relief: of indi­vidual suffering which is in no man· ner properly related to the public service or bene:lit. A prevalent tend­ency to disregard the limited mis­sion of this power and duty should, I think, be steadl.astly resisted, to the end that the lesson should be constant­ly enl.orced that though the people support the government, the govern· ment should not support the people. "The friendliness and charity ol. our countrymen can always be relied upon to relieve their fellow-citizens in mis­fortune. This has been repeatedly and quite lately demonstrated. Federal aid in such cases encourages the expccta­iion ol. paternal care on the part of the government and weakens the sturdiness ot our national character, while it prevents the Jndulgence among our people of that kindly sen­timent and conduct which strengthens the bonds ol a common brotherhood.'' (We are indebted to the Founda­tion for Economic Education for re­leasing this statement by President Cleveland, made in the days before the Socialists took over the Demo­cratic Party and before the Demo­cratic Party absorbed the Communist Party.) "Your letter to Malenkov appear~ ing on the editorial page of the Tulsa Tribune expresses my senti­ments fully" writes an Oklahoma lady who adds: "Why do not more editors similarly express themselves for the information of the general public?" Well, there are different kinds of editors. There are many who do express their views courageously and who have been defending Ameri­canism since Roosevelt first started us on the road to National Socialism. There are other editors who are part of the conspiracy against the Ameri­can form ol government and there are editors who think right and would like to express their opinion but are afraid of ol.fending certain advertis- When reporters sought an inter­view from Eleanor concerning the spicy divorce case of her oldest son, she replied haughtily that she never discussed family matters publicly. That is the correct attitude to take ol course but we hasten to add that the world would be l.ar better oct if she had never discussed anything else publicly. Page 4 TH E SOUTH ERN CONS ERVATIVE February, 1954 The Southern Conservative Women Speakers in Real Democrats and Republicans Should The Public: Forum Re-Capture Their Respective Parties A MONTHLY PUBLICATION OF EDITORIAL OPINION WITH NATIONAL CIRCULATION ll used lo be that we could either take women speakers or leave them alone but mostly we IDA M. DARDEN, Editor ran for cover like a startled jack- Editorial Offices Flat iron Bu ilding rabbit at the first sound of a fe- Fort Worth, Texas Phone FA-2089 male voice raised in public as- ---------- ' sembly. Price $5.00 Per Year (Everypeidsubscriberisentitledtoone :rhi:u~hC:!~i~;~J to be unt to eny person Sent without cost to members of Congreu, member• of State legislatures, Governors, endotherpublicofficiels. A helpless sparrow can drift with the wind but it ·takes an eagle to fly against the storm. THE TENTH AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES: EXCITING INFORMATION RELEASED FROM GENEVA United Nations World Health authorities in conference in Gene-va, Switzerland, have increased the sum total of the world's knowledge and added to the gay­ety of nations by revealing infor­mation heretofore undisclosed. Experts from nine countries met there recently to discuss the sub­ject of drunkenness and out of this collective wisdom came the star­tling information that a tall or fat person is less apt to get pickled than a short or thin one, on the same number of drinks. We don't know exactly what this is supposed to prove in the brave search for universal peace which UN is making but we feel sure that it is valuable data which should be kept in mind by all those seeking international understand­ing and harmony. The Associated Press dispatch telling of this conference revealed that cats were used in the experi· ment which enabled the experts to arrive at this important con­clusion. We always knew there were fat cats and thin cats but we didn't realize that tall cats and short cats were available for laboratory experiments. In their studies. the experts are reported to have placed alcohol in the milk served the felines and the cats are claimed to have demonstrated their likeness to the human race by lapping it up, and meowing for more. Although there is little we would put past him, it is difficult to believe that Harry Truman, with a straight face, would have the gall to say even at a meeting of ADA. that his administration had exposed and removed Com­munists from government. It is enough to make the gills of red herrings quiver with mirth. Of course Eleanor Roosevelt gave the sex a black eye in this field when she barged into the public arena some 1twenty years ago with her rasping voice, her cock-eyed theories and her bold and unwarranted assumption that she had something to say. But in recent years a heartening number of sound-thinking women who know what they are talking about have appeared on the public scene with platform poise and forensic appeal in such proportion as to cause male orators to brush up on their technique, their facts and their knowledge of funda­mental principles of government in order to combat this challeng­ing competition. We are utterly spellbound, for instance, when Vivien Kellems holds forth on the rostrum, rips the current revenue law into shreds and hplds it up to her au­dience as the great national polit­ical racket which it is. And Belgium-born S usanne Stevenson can charm the birds right out of the trees when she points up the precious heritage of the people here and pleads with them for the restoration of vanish­ing Americanism. There are scores of other women similarly informed and equally eloquent in their public discus­sions of political and economic issues but it has been our misfor­tune that we have personally heard very few of them speak. Our latest love among women speakers is Mary Cain of Summit, l\1ississippi, and we could write on the subject for hours without do­ing justice to this attractive little human dynamo from down in the Deep South . In addition to bei ng lovely to look at, this feminine Patrick Henry has a deep and profound understanding of the Constitution and the American system of gov­ernment as form ulated by its fo unders, possessed by few persons of either sex. Those who have not had the privilege of listening to her own original version of the current State of the Union, have missed one of Jife's rarest treats. A Victim of Too Much Progressive Education A Lubbock, Texas, school teacher recently asked pupils in her class to give her the correct definition of "allegory." The hand of one of her bright students went up and, when given the nod, he proceeded to give his defini­tion: ''An allegory is similar to a crock· adory and both are found in the Florida Everglades." George Parr May Not Throw Any More State Elections It looks like the beginning of the end of the reign of George Parr down in notorious Duval County of South Texas where he has long ruled over a corrupt po­litical machine rivaling that of the Pendergast gang in Missouri. Governor Allan Shivers and the State's attorney general John Ben Shepperd, have indicated that they are not fooling in their announced determination to remove this can­cerous growth from that area of the State. Extensive investigations in that section by both State and Federal authorities are reported to be caus­ing the South Texas political lead­er the first apprehension he has ever felt concerning the downfall of his empire. Throughout the years, half­hearted attempts have been made in Austin to break Parr's strangle­hold on the voters in this district, but the pressure was overwhelming and nothing ever happened. But the present state officials of Texas are not easily intimidated and there is a general feeling throughout the State that the Du­val dictator has stuffed his last ballot box and voted his last dead The Silver Lining To the Dark Cloud The failure of the original Bricker amendment to receive the approval of the Senate and the note of appeasement inserted in substitute measures by high au­thorities is, of course. a source of profound regret to all Americans who put the security of their own country first. In the moment of defeat, how­ever, most will be heartened by the vast and unprecedented num­ber of Americans who personally concerned themselves in the mat­ter and undertook to persuade meJ_TI_bers of the Senate, through petition and otherwise, to abandon political expediency in favor of national security. This spontaneous outburst of public concern in a legislative act is encouraging evidence that there are still millions of men and women in this country who refuse to concede that Americanism is a Lost Cause or that the enemy is winning in the battle for human minds. To those Americans whose shad­ow is beginning to fall toward the East and whose span of life is inevitably nearing the end, the surrender of principle by national leaders holds little in the way of thr7at of personal danger, because their responsibilities will be laid down at . the impending curtain call of time, and sentinel duty will fall to younger hands. . But the universal demonstration m support of the original Bricker The Southern Conservative said editorially in January, 1950, that both major political parties in this coun­try were ''liberal" which, when trans­lated into pla in English, means they are both Socialistic. This fact must be obvious to the most obtuse American now (lnd it must be conceded that -Constitutional government is no nearer to accom­plishment than it was under the previous national administration. The vote which put the Eisenhower administration in power was con­servative but the results are turning out to be "liberal" to put it mildly. So it would seem to be time now for efforts to be launched which will insure that in 1956, American voters will have two good sound-thinking Americans to choose from for presi­dent instead of being forced to ac­cept the lesser of two evils. Such a suggestion assumes that majority sentiment in this country is conservative and that neither politi­cal party has a monopoly on patriotic men and women more concerned in the pr·eservation of their own country than in impoverishing it to the ad­vantage of foreign nations. It this is true, the long-range view would be for conservative leaders in both parties to begin now to lay plans for 1956 and put forth a strong effort to regain control ol their respective parties and restore them to their original faith and principles. In Texas, for instance, conservative Democr ats are trying valiantly to recapture the Democratic Party stolen from them early in 1930 by Socialists and Communists who have dominated it since and there is evidence that they will succeed. Othi:!r States in the South are making similar efforts. If Conservative Republicans in each State would employ the same strategy and begin, at the local level, to wrest their party from lelt-wingers who dictate its policies, the results could be happy for long-suffering Ameri­can voters who want a change in fact as well as in theory. Socialism is just as unpalatable when served by Republicans as it is when dished up by Democrats. Organization of a Third Party is not practicable and the solution would seem to be to th row the "liberals" out of both major parties and let them affil iate with the Socialist Party where they belong. From a subscriber in Birming­ham, Alabama : HMy wife and I almost come to blows over the Sou t h ern Conservative each month. Both of us think we should read it first but we usually com­promise by dividing it into two sections. What slays me is the way you discuss deep and pro­found subjects in eloquent and high-powered language and then, to put over a point, you suddenly revert to slang expressions. Keep e up the good work." amendment participated in by cit­izens of all age groups, offers the bright augury that the fight for fundamental principles will go on and that a vast army of devoted American patriots will take over to replace those who fall out of line when life's candle is snuffed out. Fe! '1 ~ of th« th pol ali TUJ th of wh the rei ctsl 1 on Ed Th ::~ ~:~ fen cat fiv« and don SIOr thei to, and 1 inv. oud of ject thei WIH s lOU< WOt a ll T Ein! join in p trea him wha • s pl u­poliJ The it. I due~ havE matl wac] February, 1954 THE SOUTHERN CONSERVATIVE Page 5 1 'They Folded Their Tents Like the Arabs and Silently Stole Away' The "Commission for the Defense "The first witness heard when of Democracy Through Education" is the committee convened, was Ralph the somewhat imposing name of a O'Leary, a Post reporter who wrote sort of academic Gestapo set up by a long series of articles accusing the National Education Association to the Minute Women ol being one of police the actions of local school per- the key groups in causing unrest sonnel. here, in and out of schools. The Their interference in local school American Legion also was men-affairs has proceeded without inter­ruption until recently when it appears they sent their academic goon squad into the wrong city at the wrong time. The Houston School Board some­time ago failed to renew the contract of a school official for reasons with which we are not familiar but which the school board members apparently regarded as sufficient for ~heir de­cision. This should have settled the matter once and for all but the National Education Association had other ideas. Three of its crack investigators, as well as a six-member NEA selected ''committee" replete with legal coun­sel, were sent into Houston. This in­vasion by the NEA followed a formal invitation extended them by a small clique of Houston teachers who de­manded that the matter be re-opened and thoroughly aired. It appears that these NEA repre­sentatives' idea of "airing" the subject consisted of tightly closed secret meet­ings with only themselves and a lew disgruntled Houston school teachers in attendance. But it also appears that these "De­fenders o( Democracy Through Edu­cation'' had reckoned without some five hundred Houston school teachers and sixty school administrators who don't exactly care to have outsiders come in and hold Star Chamber ses­sions to decide matters involving their schools and who didn't hesitate to descend on these secret conclaves and say so. To make a long story short, the invaders are reported to have rather suddenly departed from Houston and ()t having appeared somewhat de­jected and frustrated in contrast to their cocky and self-assured manner When they first appeared on the scene. Spokesmen for NEA had protested loud and long that the "investigation" would be fair and unbiased and that all sides would be heard. The Houston Chronicle defines neatly the NEA type of "fairness", in an editorial in which it says in part: In an article discussing Albert Einstein, mathematical wizard and joiner of Communist Fronts without number, Cuthelbert Rittenhouse says in part: ''He gets by with murder and treason because propaganda has made him a 'super-Solomon.' I do not know what he is in math but I know he is a super-fool in government and a plu-perfect ass in all that pertains to Political science and social relations. The many antics he indulges in shows it. He spouts treason as glibly as a duck quacks but all wizards in math have been buggy. They know only math and in everything else th.ey are wacky.'' tioned in the O'Leary articles .. • Although the probers heard O'Leary at length, in secret session, it did not invite the Minute Women or the American Legion to give their sides of the story. When it became apparent the invitation would not be forthcoming, the Minute Women asked to be heard and were told by the committee chairman, Dr. J. W. Letson of Bessemer, Alabama, that there was not time. "The probers heard only one side. ''The probers did not invite teach­ers opposed to the NEA Investiga­tion to testify. However, about five hundred anti-probe teachers show­ed up and insisted on expressing their opinion. "The probers did not in vi t e school principals to testify. But about sixty of them appeared be­fore the committee and voiced strong opposition to an outside group coming here to meddle in purely local affairs. "The probers heard those favor­ing the investigation only in secret session. It heard those opposing the investigation only in open sessions where the public could hear every word that was said. The opponehts demanded open sessions. "How can the public properly evaluate charges made by people who insist on operating in secret? That procedure is reminiscent of the Ku Klux Klan, where people were charged without an oppor­tunity to an~wer or to know who their accusers were. Certainly that is not the American way." The Chronicle also pointed out that when the School Board presi­dent, James M. Delmar, proposed that a free and unpressured secret ballot be taken by Houston school teachers to decide whether the ,in­vitation to NEA !or an investigation represented the views of a majority of Houston teachers, the NEA probers recessed and left town. "Houston will never be willing to accept dictation from the outside in purely local affairs," the Chron­icle concluded. One of the hits of the Chicago Bar Association's annual Christ­mas Party was a scene in which an attorney, impersonating Ma­dame Pandit of India, president of the United Nations general assembly, offered a "pledge of al­legiance to the flag of the United Nations, and to the chaos for which it stands, sixty nations, in­compatible, with jealously and sus­picion for all." From a Fort Worth business executive: "This must be one hell of a fine country tC? withstand the assaults of those maimed physi­cally and mentally, the homo­sexuals, the wasters, incompetents and radicals." We Had Better Look Ahead to Our Future Status in the United Nati~~s Those Americans who are earnestly trying to evaluate the United Nations and to weigh its benefits against its potential danger to American insti­tutions should keep two important facts in mind. First the Charter of the United Na­tions provides that amendments to that document shall be made in 1955 and this is to be done in July of next year. Sometime ago the World Govern­ment Conference met in London and drew up a list of proposed amend­ments which have been endorsed by World Conference groups in this country. These proposed amendments, aside !rom destroying freedom of speech, freedom of the press, freedom of re­ligion and right o! trial by jury, pro­vide that no member nation who once becomes a member of the United Na­tions shall ever be permitted to with­draw. These amendments can be adopted by a majority vote which means that thirty one countries can adopt them even if the United States should cast its vote against them. Once that happens, we're sunk as nothing is said in these proposed amendments aboUt any nation having the veto and that right will probably be abrogated. Up until July, 1955, we have the privilege of withdrawing from the United Nations and if the American people intend to do anything to keep this country but of a permanent World Government with rules of pro­cedure similar to those of the Krem­lin. they had better act before then. The second thing to consider is that of our status in the Security Council when Communist China is admitted t() the United Nations, even if the proposed amendments are not adopt­ed. Any one who feels that the admis­sion of Communist China to the UN is improbable is whistling in the dark. We refer to Mr. John Foster Dulles' position in the matter as outlined In his latest book titled "War or Peace", on page 190 where he says: ''If the Communist government of China in fact proves its ability to govern China without serious domestic resistance, then it, too, should be admitted to the United Nations .. • Communist govern­ments today dominate more than thirty per cent of the population ot the world. We may not like that /act; indeed, we do not like it at aJI. But it: we want to have a world organization, then it should be representative of the world as it is". As our Secretary of State, Mr. Dulles will have much to say as to whether or not Communist China be­comes a member Nation. Since he has openly expressed the above opinion, and since the le()pard cannot change its spots nor the Ethiope his skin his convictions on the subject will proba­bly break through when the time comes. The membership of the Security Council, which is the· heart ot United Nations, is composed ot Russia, the They Must Have Used Our Filing System Staff members of the Department of Justice told the House Appropria­tions Committee that they had been working on the files in that office for a year and asserted that they had a . long way to go before bringing order out ()! chaos. According to this testimony, they found twenty thousand important documents and reports covering a period of twenty years operation, hid­den away in the most unlikely places, including one leiter that was written fifteen years ago which was still wait­ing to be posted. This letter, accord­ing to one Washington newsman was found behind a steam radiator. Included among the documents which had gotten swept into the cor­ners or shoved under the rug were those relating to the Harry Dexter White spy case and FBI reports on other subversive figures and turned over to the Department but apparent.J ly never read. Well, any one who has kept up with the activities of those who headed that Department since 1933 will easi­ly understand that, with their extra­curricular doings, they just simply didn't have time to mess around keep­ing track of twenty thousand little old routine reports and information about spies in government. Somehow we got the jmpression that one of the changes the Ameri­can people were promised was the removal of Federal housing from competition with private builders. We must have been dreaming, however, for we now read of a unew and revitalized" Federal housing program which is to con­struct 140,000 housing units. Next time. we must listen carefully to candidates in campaigns because we are always imag'ining they said one thing and then they turn ri~ht around and do the opposite. United States, Nationalist China, France and England. The United States is the only major power that opposes the admission of Communist China, Russia, France and England all being strong foL· it, so naturally they will finally be ad­mitted. That means Communist China wi11 replace Nationalist China on the Se­curity Council and then where are we? No time need be wasted in explain­ing Russia . England is wavering back and forth between political ideologies and her leaders would sell their own mother in exchange for trade, m()ney and power, while France, like a weak and willing blonde, will fall ·the first time she's pushed. So there will be the United States in the Security Council with two strong Communist countries and two weak and wobbly nalions who have yet to prove thck loyalty to us in a showdown. No good American can lose any­thing by considering these phases ot the subject before deciding that the United Nations is our only salvation. Page 6 THE SOUTHE RN CONSERVATIVE February, 1954 Gangsters Not the Only Ones Who Refuse to Squeal on Each Other 'Watch Out Trusting People' An article which recently appeared in Collier's entitled "Speak Out Silent People" is apparently having its in­tended effect and is confusing and dividing right-thinking Americans who are genuinely concerned in pub­lic education, in the opinion of one of the leading citizens of Texas whose friendship for our public school sys­tem is beyond question. What This Country Needs Is More 1\merican Legions The trouble with the national American Legion is that there is only one of it, although of course its branches and chapters throughout the country are all doing equally excel· lent work in behalf of Americanism. We Wouldn't Give Them All The Hay They Could Eat The Communist Daily Worker and Time Magazine made bitter attacks sometime ago on Facts Forum of Dallas, a national radio and television discussion panel which seeks to present both sides of important public issues. In these attacks , which were al· most identical in substance, Facts Forum was accused of bias in the presentation of its programs and its sponsor was charged with un­dertaking to influence conserva­tive thinking in this country to the detriment of liberal opinion. These allegations are, of course, in direct conflict with the truth. Any one who is familiar with Facts Forum programs cannot escape being impressed with the courtesy, consideration and im­partiality invariably displayed to­ward all participants in the dis· cussions without regard to their political views. Mr. Dan Smoot, able, intelligent and highly informed moderator of the program ignored the Daily Worker's tirade but delivered over thC' ai1· a c1ear-cut, dignified and musterly reply to Time which, according to majority reaction among listeners, trimmed that publication down to size. If we were going to make a complaint against Facts Forum, which we are not, we would pro· test vigorously against the appear­ance of any left-wingers on the program at all. Maybe they have a viewpoint but, if so, it has been hammered intt> American minds for more than two decades and they are away out ahead in the race to get their propaganda over to the public. The Federal government has provided, at taxpayers' expense, a ''Forum" through which t heir propaganda has been disseminated for twenty years, while sound, conservative American opinion has been without a vehicle for expression and hasn't had a look-in. If we were the sponsor of Facts Forum, we would not use one ~e~~~1~~1~ubr0~~nf;; ~~::r~~~i:, the pink school of political thought that has given Socialism a stran· gle-hold on the Federal govern­ment which apparently can't be broken. We would present an "Amer· ican Forum" in which only funda­mental principles of the Republic would be given expression, as a public service to long-suffering Americans who have been fed to the gills with propaganda from the left, and the nearest any "Lib­eral" would get to the program would be when he heard it on radio or viewed it on television. In the u nderworld, gangsters have their own code of ethics which prevents them from inform· ing on other criminals and, al­most without exception, they strictly adhere to this rule. Educators who are suspected of being part of the Communist con­spiracy to overthrow the Ameri­can government have a similar code against squealing on their buddies. In the parade of pink professors, both male and female, before in­vestigating committees in Wash· ington , there have been very few who have confessed their own part in the conspiracy against this country and practically none who were willing to name their co· conspirators. Professor Wendell H. Furry of Harvard University, is typical of those who refuse to cooperate. Although confessing that he had been a member of the Communist Party until March, 1951, when he resigned, he refused to name others among his associates. "I do not think my duty to my country requires me to become a political informer" the Furry creature replied in answer to ques­tions concerning five other Com· munists who worked with him in r adar laboratories at the Massa· chusetts Institute of Technology. Texas School Board Submits to Labcsr Union Blackman Tactics "Howard Whitman, author of the article, points out what is wrong with Progressive Education and hammers away at the same faults which con­servative individuals and groups have been shouting for years, but he gives credit to the wrong people," this Texan writes us and adds: "Whitman undertakes to make a dirty word of 'extremist,' after his crowd has already done a job on 1n.alionalism.' According to Whitman it is just as harmful to be an extreme right-winger as it is to be an extreme left-winger. According to his philos­ophy, it is just as dangerous to be very, very good as it is to be very, very bad. So he would have us all It we had had one hundred na4 tiona! groups during the past twenty years combatting Communism with the fervor the Legion has shown, the battle against domestic Communists would have been won long ago. As early as 1920 the Legion was insisting that school children be in­structed in fundamenta l American principles and were warning against the infiltration of our educational in4 stitutions by Communist propaganda. "We are still fighting the battle to get Communism out of our schools and Americanism into them" Arthur J , Connell, national commander said in a speech in Dallas recently. Patriotic Americans Are Put On "Blacklist" in California take a middle-of-the road path, and According to the February 5th edi­we right-wingers must keep our tion of the Los Angeles Herald and mouths shut and let the left-wingers Express strange maneuvers are going have the floor. This is the new line on there in regard to politics and civic and the new look and you will see it affairs. brought more and more into play. A secret blacklist naming many well Watch for it. known Los Angeles patriots who have "Whitman knows fu ll well that championed Amer icanism in the pub· the extreme le!t-wingers, including lie schools as opposed to UNESCO Communists, can' t be silenced and doctrines, is being circulated accord· that they work around the clock but ing to that paper. he hopes to shame us extreme right- This blacklist was sent out by the wingers into a dignified silence. If Los Angeles division of the "Citizens he succeeds, heaven help the public Commission for Public Schools" of schools. which one Zane Meckler is chairman. "Whitman attempts to steer well - A letter accompanying the black-meaning people into the clutches of list referred to those on such list as the National Citizens Commission for "threats to the freedom of education A typical instance of how labor the Public Schools, an organization and to the democratic process" ac· unions are able to blackmail Ameri- which interlocks with the National cording to the Herald and Express. can citizens and fr ighten them into Education Association. The NCCPS is It appears from the article that the compliance with their rules was af- trying to ring in lay citizens as NEA basis used by the "Citizens Commis-forded in Dallas recently. has successfully done the teachers. sion for Public Schools" in placing A new physical education plant was "The National Citizens Commis- these courageous citizens on the to be constructed there and the proj- sion for the Public Schools, which is blacklist was their opposition to the ect was open to bids, the only reason financed by the Carnegie Foundation teaching of UNESCO in the Los An­for this procedure being to get the and the General Education Fund, geles public schools. In a fight to oust job done with the least cost to the was organized upon the recommen- . Communist- inspired UNESCO rna­taxpayers who furnish the money. dation o.f NEA's Paul Mort and J ames terial from the school system there A non-union firm submitted a bid B. Conant. Its directors include some sometime ago, opponen ts of UNESCO which was nine hundred dollars lower of the most outspoken international- were victorious. than the next one, but school board ists in America, such as Mrs. Eugene In addition to attacking Los An­officials refused to give the job to Meyer o.f the Washington Post family, geles Citizens who seek to protect the low bidder on the ground that it Roy Larson of Time, Louis B. Seltzer their school system from a Communist might of(end the union general con- of ttiej Cleveland Press, Mrs. Barry curricula, the Commission also in­tractor and cause "work stoppage" on Bingham of the Louisville Courier- eluded on its blacklist those who favor the project. Journal, John Cowles of the Min- the re-election of State Senator J ack Added up, it means that Dallas neapolis Tribune, Victor Reuther and B. Tenney to the California lawmak· school board members officially ap- the Urban League's Lester B. Gran- ing body. proved gangster methods and com- ger. Senator Tenney has been untiring pletely disregarded the interests of ';Whitman wants us all to join in his fight against Communism and the taxpayers of that county. hands now with these international- has made it tough on subversives A good Texan, referring to this country's generosity to all the world, urges that we should not forget the story of the man who created a Frankenstein monster that finally destroyed him, the eagle who was killed by an arrow guided by a feather from his own wing, and the man who warmed up a cold rattlesnake only to have it sink its fangs in his body in a fatal bite. The Bible, he says, warns us against casting pearl be­fore swine lest they turn on and rend us. ists and get our brains thoroughly who have thickly dot the West Coast washed of 'nationalism' and other for many years. 'extreme' ideas. Senator Tenney's opponent is a "Now who recommends Howard woman reported to be sponsored by Whitman's articles? None other than Earl Warren and who hopes to ac­UNESCO. In the UNESCO Story put complish what Warren fa iled to do out by the U. S. Commission for in California and that is to get FEPC UNESCO, Washington, D. C., page legislation passed by the legislature of 49, another article by Whitman titled that State. 'Is ·Prejudice Poisoning Our Kids' is recommended. This, incidentally, ap­pears in the section on Human Rights and the Genocide Convention. "So let us watch out for a new look and a new line spouted by the same old crowd. The real purpose of the articles will develop as the series by Whitman unfolds. "Meantime, all good Americans should speak out more than ever for God, Country and our Public Schools." ic February, 1954 THE SOUTHERN CONSERVATIVE Pago 1 America- Europe's Happy Hunting Ground (This article by WilLIS BAlLINGER, noted economist Is reproduced by spacial per .. mission of Human Events, Washington, D. C., in whose p ublications it first appeared.} The signs are that in 1955 the inter· about the origin and 1Jurposes of Twa-two powerful private groups, has been approved by a two to one nationalists will attempt to trap the World War I were dug up by emi- financed chiefly by American dupes, vote by the Senate Committee which United States into a world govern· nent historians, it was learned how spring into existence to promote the held hearings on it last session of ment by amending the United Na- we had let ourselves in for what was destruction of American sovereignty. Congress, the Administration blocked tions Char ter. obviously a milking operation. No The World Federalists-teeming with it from coming to a vote in the Sen• For half a century clever Euro· soonet had the League been organized pro-Soviet sympathizers or worse - ate. It offered a substitute known as peans have schemed to lay hands on than it launched a campaign to con- urge that UN be converted Into a the "Knowland amendment"-a sub· the vast wealth of America by placing dition our citizens to the idea of join· world government including Russia stitute which our Bar Association our sovereignty under an interna· tional political body. For the great majority of Americans a surrender of that sovereignty is unthinkable; but, unfortunately, few of us are cognizant of the effectiveness of this plot. The fact is that the intriguers have built up an army of American dupes, a propaganda machine lubricated by untold millions of dollars. In Wash­ington they have an Administration highly suspected of having been sold on the window dressing for the be­trayal of American independence, a window dressing resplendent with the spiritual garb of peace, humanitarian­ism and the brotherhood of man; but behind this promise lies danger. Will of Cecil Rhodes: The British diamond tycoon, Rhodes, dreamed of reducing the world--or as much of it as possible-to British control and the recovery of the United States for the British Crown. He left his vast fortune to provide scholarships at his Alma Mater, Oxford University, to train promising leaders to carry out his purpose. American Rhodes schol­ars arc expected to absorb the idea that civilization must revolve around t he Br itish Crown and Empire. The "order of Rhodes" in America is small in number, but influential on public opinion-legislators, t e a c h e r s, au­thors, editors, preacher s, radio com­mentators. It functions generally as an elite corps of propagandists. Andrew Carnegie: Like Rhodes, Carnegie wanted to use America for the benefit of England. He made a huge fortune in America, but at the end of his life he turned dutifully towards his beloved England, leaving behind him, however, a vast propa­ganda machine to deprive us of our independence. In 1893 Carnegie said publicly: "Either England must recapture her giant child of the West or sure­ly decline to a secondary power and then to insignificance. When we have reunion, England will be re­lieved of the greater portion of her national debt and of at least one half of its present heavy taxation. Every kind of property in the sceptered isle and every business interest will be doubled by re­union. Reunion will restore to England ownership in hundreds of millions of acres of fresh, fertile soil and boundless resources." The Carnegie propaganda machine works through the Carnegie Founda­tion; the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace; public "Carne· gie" libraries where there are "Inter­national Mind Alcoves" for adults, and for the tots "Children's Interna· tiona! Mind Alcoves"; international study clubs and subsidized lecturers; the promotion of books, articles and pamphlets that carry the right mes­sage. The League of Nations: The Amer­ican people repudiated the League. Nevertheless, when tht true facts ing an international body controlled by European powers. The League was the hope of dis­tracted trade interests in Europe, but its designs were cleverly concealed behind a pother about loving the peoples of the globe-loving them so well that nationalistic boundaries, tariffs and immigration barriers in America would seem un-Christian and absurd. The catch words were world peace, friendship, tolerance and prosperity-just as they are toM day. The League made a special fuss over our children-ballot casters In the making. This was the tragic - period when the British really rolled up t h e i r sleeves for the job of recapturing their giant child of the West. They lav 1ched the Junior Red Cross, and our kids were put through courses in scientific sobbing-writing notes of consolation to foreign children. George Milsom, Director of this or­ganization, said: "It does seem fairly reasonable that children who during their years of mental development have learn­ed to sympathize with their fel· lows will when they have reached manhood be determined to fight for the removal o.f every obstacle sep­arating ihem from their fellows in far-ofi lands." In line with this program, the British internationalized our Girl Scouts; the girls were given a world flag and were taught at meetings to take a hall-burned brand from the campfire as a symbol of world sister­hood. 1945 to November 1952: In this period, international plotters with the solid backing of the New Deal ran wild in America-and all but did us in. Some highlights: One-The United Nations takes the place of the old League, but operates under far mor~ favorable circum­stances. Its propaganda bills are now paid for largely by Americans and it is located inside the United States for the greater convenience of the propa­gandists. UN becomes an octopus for undermining American sovereignty. One powerful tentacle takes over the task of indoctrinating our s c h o o 1 children with the idea of world citi· zenship. Another concentrates on wresting away from Congress its con­trol of our tariff policies. Another works to fasten on our industries a world labor code that will scuttle the Taft-Hartley law and give our social­ist labor bosses power to force a liquidation of capitalism in the Unit­ed States. Other equally powerful tentacles of the UN seek to serve up piecemeal a world . political code which, our American Bar Association declares, will destroy our sacred Bill of Rights, give the President power to suspend our Constitutional guarantees, sub­ject Americans to trial before an in· ternational .criminal court, and con­vert the Federal Government into a thorough-going socialist State. and her satellites. The Atlantic Union group, founded by a Rhodes scholar, proposes that the US, E n g 1 a n d, France, Holland, Belgium and Can­ada establish a common government for a starter. The World Federalists work on our State legislatures. Carelessly, over 20 states pass a resolution endorsing world government--a r e so 1 u t ion sponsored by a Rhodes s c h o 1 a r. Then the Veterans of Foreign Wars, the DAR and other patriotic societies wake up, and most of the State Legis· latures which had endorsed world government reverse themselves. The Atlantic Union people .focus their at­tention on Congress-and the r e, startling results are achieved. Four different schemes for world govern­ment, supported by a total of 38 Sen­ators and some 150 Representatives, appear. A Congressional resolution backed by 22 Senators and over a hundred Representatives proposes to put Congress on record as favoring world federation as the "fundamental objective" of American foreign policy. Three-World government protag­onists infiltrate important American foundations. Conspicuous example­Robert Maynard Hutc:.hins, President of the University of Chicago, and an all-out advocate of world govern­ment, becomes Associate Director of the Ford Foundation controlling hun· dreds of millions. Four-In the fall of 1952, U. S. Senator Guy Gillette, U. S. Repre­sentative Leroy Johnson, and a for­mer Justice of our highest tribunal go to Canada to confer with leaders of the' Canada in Parliament on Atlantic Union. The €anadian Parliament had already indorsed Atlantic Union. So matters stood when Ike took over. It is now clear that the inter­nationalism which for more than fifty years has schemed to destroy our sovereignty and sap our wealth was not halted when the New Deal was turned out of office. It is closing in fast for complete victory and under the auspices of a Republican admin­istration. These are the sad facts: One: President Eisenhower believes in a world government. Two: His brother Dr. Milton Eisen­hower, whose influence with the President Is wellMknown, is also a firm believer in a world government. Three: Secretary of State Dulles Js a staunch world government advo­cate. Two days after he was selected last fail to be Secretary of State, Dulles sent a congratulatory telegram to the Atlantic Union Congress meet­ing in Buffalo, praising the idea of Atlantic Union but suggesting that NATO be used as the basis for fash­ioning the contemplated international State. Four: The Bricker amendment to the Constitution which would close the door on any treaty over-riding the Constitution, is strongly opposed by President Eisenhower. Though this amendment is actually a product of the American Bar Association, and voted down as inadequate. Five: Before the Louisville Bar Asw sociation, Mr. Dulles admitted that through a mere treaty the Constitu­tion could be scrapped-that power could be taken away from the States and given to Congress, power' taken away from Congress and given to the Executive, or power taken away from the Federal and State Governments and given to an international body, Conceding that our national sover­eignty could be destroyed through a treaty, Dulles at that time thought an amendment to the Constitution desirable. But before the Senate Comw mittee holding hearings on the Brick­er amendment Mr. Dulles opposed it -told the Senators it was not neces4 sary as the administration had no in­tention of doing anything about the Genocide Pact and the Declaration of Human Rights--both denounced by our Bar Association as subverting our Bill of Rights and supplying a blue­print for world socialism. The next morning President Eisenhower cabled a congratulatory message to the Hu­man Rights Convention in Geneva. Only a few weeks ago our representa­tive in the UN-Mr. Lodge-voted for the Genocide Pact. Six: 1955 is the year when the in­terna tionalists expect to reap their reward of fifty years of propagandiz­ing Americans. This is the year when the UN Charter will be revised. Mr. Dulles has already stated that revision · of the charter offers a "great oppor­tunity." Since Mr. Dulles is an advo· cate of world government, his char .. acterization of the present UN Char­ter as "pre·atomic" and his viewing of UN Charter revisions in 1955 as affording a "great opportunity" ia a clear warning that he looks lor· ward to a revision which will commit us to some form of world govern­ment. Seven: Vice-President Nixon, who has actually indorsed the Atlantic Union scheme, has picked a Senate Committee of eight Senators to re· port on revision of the UN Charter. Of the eight, seven are thorough· going internationalists; four have come out publicly .for world govern­ment. The other Js Senator Know land, who was willing to do a job for the Administration on the B r J c k e r Amendment. It would be hard to find a more perfectly packed committee to carry out the wishes of President Eisenhower, Dr. Milton Eisenhower and Secretary Dulles. Not even one place was allotted to a representatkre of the Taf.t-Hoover school of Amer­Jcanism which speaks for the great majority of Americans and w h i c b would never consent to a betrayal of our national sovereignty. We have, then, in our midst, a giant Trojan Horse carefully fabri­cated by Cecil Rhodes, Andrew Car· negie, the League of Nations, the United Nations, the World Federal­Ists, the Atlantic Union group, and their dupes. Wili ours be the fate of Troy-taken from the inside? . Page 8 THE SOUTHERN CONSERVATIVE February, 1954 Army Discovers New W ay t o The Universal Theme Song . of Fl~~.no~~ ~~o:e::~:~s::on~;:~- Nature Is 'To Each His Own' Colored School Teacher Tells Of Communist Party Tactics formers to take over and start work· ing over the Army in an effort to make it "democratic" we didn't rea­lize there would be no stopping them. In addition to passing rules to make officers and enlisted men buddy up to each other on terms of equality, thus destroying discipline and morale, they are taking additional steps to louse things up. Now it is announced in the press that the Army is conducting a poll at its installations throughout the world !~r~~da~~t ::;; ~~~g~~eth~hyei:~~~~ like made in the style, cut and fash­ion of their togs. What are they going to do if one of their questionnaires goes to some sissy who comes back and insists that they sew lace on the bottom of his 'tants? What difference does it make, for heaven's sake, what style uniforms our soldiers are given to wear? They are only supposed to be used in times of war, and wars are not supposed to be called unless Congress decides to declare war ag~inst an attacking enemy. Evidently, Army officials are pro­ceeding on the theory that we are going into the fighting business on a permanent basis and are giving Amer­ican boys a chance to decide what type of clothes they will wear from here to eternity. An Hour Late and A Dollar Short The President has appointed a Commission, with the Honorable Clarence Manion of Indiana, a dis­tinguished Constitutional lawyer, as its head. The purpose of this Commission is to decide what powers and duties shall be reserved to the States, and what powers exercised by the Fed­eral government. We have always been under the impression that this job had already been done very effectively back in the days when the Constitution was written. We thought that the Tenth Amend­ment to the Bill of Rights was plain enough !or any American to under~ stand: "The powers n ot delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited to it by the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people." Surely there is no occasion to spend time, money and effort in finding out what rights the States enjoy and what powers are delegated to the Federal government, when the infor­mation could be obtained in a few minutes by reading the Constitution ot the United States. Referring to the president's declara­tion that he is both a "liberal" and a "conservative", Mr. Dick West writes in the Dallas Morning News: "He wants to give more people more pen­sions, but cut down on spending; ex­tend health care, but bring the budg­et nearer to balance; make security more social but free business of all shackles; extend electricity but do it with private enterprise". Those who make the stupid as­sertion that the United Nations is a perfect instrument for recon­ciling conflicting opinions of man­kind have probably never heard the story of the first futile effort ever made to organize various un­related and uncongenial types, classes and kinds into one har­monious group. This undertaking was not en­gaged in by men but was insti­tuted by beasts of the jungle while cooped up in Noah's Ark. Since the chimpanzee was re­garded as an intellectual among his associates, it is reported that he thought up the idea, formulated the Charter and rendered similar services which entitled him to be classed as the Alger Hiss of the animal kingdom. The purpose of the undertaking was to prevent discrimination in the use of the Ark's facilities, in­sure an equal distribution of food and to keep the animals from fighting among themselves during the forty days and nights of the Flood. The giraffe was made Secre~ tary General since he could easily look over the heads of the dele­gates to see what was cooking and put down devilment before it got out of hand. Since there were no voting ma­chines and member s of the Assem­bly could not write, it was decided that each animal would cast his ballot by raising his tail. Everything was fine and mat­ters proceeded on a harmonious basis until a controversial matter Communist Forces Plan to Investigate Our Schools The United Nations has set up a ucommission on Discrimination and Protection o( Minorities" composed o( representatives of eleven countries, including, of course, Soviet Russia. Ordinarily it would not matter bow many Commissions they set up, but this one proposes to undertake a worldwide in vestigation of discrimi­nation in education, including a probe of th e subject in this country. This Commission, like all others in the United Nations, is Communist­inspired and Communist·controlled and its potentialities for danger to our institutions by allowing foreign in­tervention in our domestic affairs makes the blood of every good Ameri­can boil with rage. All decent Americans ask of athe­istic aliens is that they keep their dirty hands off American schools, run their own to suit themselves and let us do the same. H we had the courageous and patri­otic national leadership we once had, these Americans would not have to plead in vain for this protection from invasion by Godless forces. The CIO which used to have the run of the White House and without whose sanction very few official executive decisions were made, is not around any more. It has been suc­ceeded by the NAACP. came uo for decision, with opinion almost "equally divided. As the balloting ended, all the animals lowered their tails except the billygoat who couldn't, since nature had adjusted his at a per­manent upright angle. At this stage of the proceedings the lady kangaroo, one of the los­ers, arose to a point of order and charged that the whole thing was crooked as the billygoat had voted on both sides of the question. This infuriated the billygoat and his comrades from behind the Angora Curtain who immediately attacked his accuser and made a direct hit on her pouch with their pointed horns. This resulted in a free-for-all fight. after which the bleeding participants crawled out on deck to lick their wounds and count their casualties. Meantime, wiser and older ani· mals who had stayed out of the fight and escaped injury called the Security Council together and dissolved the organization after deciding that there was no com­mon ground on which animals with widely different natures, im­pulses and instincts could come to­gether in a harmonious meeting of minds. Dorothy Funn, a colored New York school teacher who recently appeared before the Committee on Un-Amer­ican Activities in Washington, proved a refreshing contrast to other mem­bers of the teaching fraternity sum­moned by that body. Although confessing that she had formerly been a member of the Com­munist Party, she gave evidence ot sincere repentance for having been led astray and cooperated fully with the Committee in answering ques­tions and providing information. She provided the Committee with written instructions given American teachers by the Communist Party which pointed out such teachers' re­sponsibility as a "good Communist teacher in the United States today." This document said in part: "While teachers are part of the working class, their function differs vastly from that of the industrial worker. Communist teachers cannot afford to ignore this fact-that they come in contact with children of the masses, that they are responsible for training these children. They must realize the primary function of the schools is to educate these children and this will be true to a much greater extent in a Socialist society than now. Communist teachers are, therefore, faced with a tremendous social responsibility. They must con­sider not merely their own teacher problems, but the problems of the children. They must fight for the latter. They must mobilize the other teachers in this fight. They must take advantage of their positions, without exposing th emselves, to give to their students to the best of thefr ability working-class education. Thereafter. each animal went about his own business and a rest­ful and comforting spirit of peace descended on the group which con­tinued until the lady dove, who had been out casing the situation, flew in the window with an olive branch in her bill and announced that land was near, the trip was ended and the Ark was ready to "To enable the teacher in the Party to do the latter, the Party must take careful steps to see that an teacher dock. _ comrades are given thorough educa-tion in the teachings of Marxism- Running With the Hare and Le.~b~:;\vhen teachers have really mastered Marxism·Leninism, will Trailing With the Hounds ~~:ir ":'e:~~~n~~n~~1!;;eto ~~~~~ctri!~n~~ One of the most confusing state- exposure and at the same time to ments of policy which has come from ~~~:o~~t in t~e tr~i~ui~~:~1e:;:u;~nn~hr~ the White House was the president's "A people's movement around th& recent assertion that he is both a school can thus transform the latter "liberal" and a "conservative". into popular forums for vrogressive social action-ultimately into forums He is, he says, a "humanitarian lib- for the revolution." eral and an economic conservative". He added this illuminating observa­tion: "When the government deals with human beings, it ought to be liberal; when it dea1s wilh economic affairs, it ought to be conservative". Most ol us learned for the first And we hope that any American who may have thought that warnings about Communists infiltrating our schools was the dream of "alarm­ists" will read the above over until he has thoroughly digested it. Dorothy Funn said this statement was taken from a magazine called ~;~t r;~;:{ ~~: ~:~~~~:~t=c~~~~oYunaC:~ ~~;eh~o~=~~r~~~~::~~~d ~~:t ~r~~! ~~i;sal~n~ei~g:t ~::o t~~fe:?n~ras~ts e:f ;~ii~tl:n e~~it~~~ !,t~~a':ch~~n~n~n t~~ philosophies of government are neces- Pe~h~e'ste~~;:ot~~ o( this outspoken sary in dealing with them. teacher indicated that she was drawn Since our "conservative" economy into the Communist Party because of must provide the means and money a mistaken belie( that one of its whereby political leaders can afford objectives was the betterment of the ~o~~d''l:::::l'~h:;t~:ru:~~n~~gs~n~ ~~!~e~t ra~~e~nds~~atdi~~~v:'ri~~drt~; human beings are inextricably 'tied falli:y t~! t:ai~~latii~·e that she testi­together and that a national leader fied, ten other teachers also appeared who hopes to bring us out of chaos before the Committee but each ot would be compelled to stick to one them refused to tc11 whether or not set of ideologies in order to resolve they were Communists, or had ever, all problems in the general interest been and took re(uge, o( course, be­and welfare. hind the Filth amendment to the Ot course we have always had poli- c~;~i;~~~nfor the Revolution." So ticians who tried to carry water on that is the fancy titles for our public. both shoulders but in the old days we schools, applied by the Soviets. Isn't used to call it straddling the fence. that something?
File Name pdf_uhlib_10604411_v005_n002_ac.pdf