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The Southern Conservative, Vol. 8, No. 6, June 1957
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The Southern Conservative, Vol. 8, No. 6, June 1957 - File 001. 1957-06. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 20, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/southern/item/1117/show/1108.

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(1957-06). The Southern Conservative, Vol. 8, No. 6, June 1957 - File 001. The Southern Conservative. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/southern/item/1117/show/1108

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The Southern Conservative, Vol. 8, No. 6, June 1957 - File 001, 1957-06, The Southern Conservative, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 20, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/southern/item/1117/show/1108.

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Title The Southern Conservative, Vol. 8, No. 6, June 1957
Contributor
  • Darden, Ida M.
Publisher Southern Conservative
Date June 1957
Language English
Subject
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
Place
  • Fort Worth, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 10604411
Collection
  • Houston Metropolitan Research Center
  • Ida M. Darden Collection
  • The Southern Conservative
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Houston Metropolitan Research Center.
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript THE SOUTHERN CONSERVATIVE -To Plead for a Return of Constitutional Government- Vol. 8 FORT WORTH, TEXAS, JUNE, 1957 No.6 Is the State Department Working for the United States or for Foreign Countries? Let's Extend Rather Than Limit Debate in United States Senate befor': 8 a a~~:;~fe1d ~~~~~~~at!Ie a0 fs;:c:~~i!~~~~~~ftt~!d o~5 t~e 8 k~~:~ Committee of the United States Senate to be held for the purpose of discussing a tenatlve plan o! limiting debate In that body. While we are by no means an authority on the subject, we feel that we have an equity in the matter which all Americans enjoy under a system of government which is presumably of the people, by the people and for the people. It is in that capacity, and as a sovereign citi­zen, that we herein offer our views, since we will be unable to attend the hearing. The very fact that there should be any tentative proposal by members of the United States Senate for limiting debate on legislation affecting the economic and social destiny o! 170,000,000 Americans, is, itself, a threat tb Constitutional Government even if, ultimately, no change Is made in the present system. It indicates a disposition to further whittle a~ay the fast vanishw tng rights and institutions which are basic in the American govern ng system. The glorious history of the past has been largely written around the eloquent addresses which masterful speakers like Daniel Webster, Henry Clay and John C. Calhoun made on the floor o! the United States Senate in defense of, or opposition to, legislative measures vital to the interests of all the people of the American Republic. If there is one place under God's great canopy where .discus.sion of important public issues should be full, free and unrestramed, 1t is in the Upper House of the American Congress which operates as our legislative Court of Last Resort handing down decisions on domes.tic and foreign policies of deepest import to the people of the last remam~ ing Constitutional nation on earth. We can only conclude that a proposal b~ cert~in member~ ~f that great lawmaking body to cut debate and dehberabon to the m1mmum, means that they personally have nothing to say and would not know how to say It if they did, and, having no worthwhile contribution to make to subjects under discussion, they prefer v?te-s~apping and horse-trading tactics in the enactment of legislation smce 1t imposes no strain on their intellect and saves wear and tear on their brain. We respectfully point out to the sub-committee of the Committee on Rules that If there had been 11Unlimited" debate between all members of the Senate on that dark day in August of 1945 and the American people had thereby been informed of the provisions in the fine print o! the United Nations Charter, this Republic would not today be verg­ing on one-world government and its taxpayers committed to the finan­cial and mllitary support of alien peoples in the four corners of the earth. What responsible American citizens demand of their public serv­ants in the Senate of the United States is not that they say less but that they talk more about legislation before them, to the end that not only the American people may be informed of the subject but that they, themselves, may thereby acquire more knowledge concerning Consti­tutionallegtslative procedure, a subject about which they too often dis­play a woeful lack of understanding. That a proposal to limit debate in the Senate is even to be con­sidered poses a dangerous possibility for the American people which is only mitigated by the fact that one member of the sub-committee, the Honorable Herman Talmadge of .Georgia, is possessed of a measure of statesmanship and understanding of the Constitution not surpassed by that of any of his illustrious predecessors in that body and he will r~present, in the discussions, not only the people of Georgia but all good citizens of the United States. · Although the American taxpayers put up the money to pay the salaries of Its vast and far-flung personnel, the State Department's primary concern seems to be for the Industry of foreign nations and top officials of that agency appear singularly disinterested in the welfare of American producers. Under the usurped legislative au· thorlty to fix tariff rates and regulate foreign commerce which the Department now exercises, American business concerns which are unable to meet the increasingly un· fair competition that the arrangement imposes, are gradually folding up and going out of business. Section 8 of Article I of the Constitution of the United States says that: "The Congress shall have power to lay and collect taxes, duties, imposts .•. to regulate commerce with foreign countries." This provision in the Constitution has never been repealed or amended through regular processes yet Congress has lost the authority thus delegated to it by those who wrote our basic law and the State Department, whose proper functions lie solely in the diplomatic field, now exercises this authority through a diabolic trick played on the American people more than twenty years ago. When this country was still operated under Constitutional Gov­ernment, tari legislation was written in the Congress and was framed either by the Democrats or Republicans, aCcording to which political party was in ~ower. (There were no International Socialists in the legis­lative, executive or judicial branches of the American government dur .. lng that period). At that time the two major political parties were separate en­tities and had differing views on major issues including the tariff. Re­publicans generally were for a tariff which would protect American in­dustry while Democrats believed in free trade and, except in special items, allowed products from other countries to come in duty-free to compete with those of domestic producers. When the New Deal came to power, Franklin D. Roosevelt, who was a puppet of the Internationalists, too, persuaded a weak-kneed Congress to transfer authority to pass tariff legislation over to the White House. This was done not only in violation of the Constitution but of the rights of American producers and manufacturers who would thereby be forced to compete with the products of poorly-paid labor in foreign countries turned out by plants and factories which, believe it or not, are built with money given them as Hforeign aid". This adds insult to injury in the case of American business firms. This unconstitutional transfer of authority occurred during the depression when Americans by the thousands were practically falling over each other in the mad stampede to Washington to get a hand-out from Roosevelt whom they saw as a little tin God and in the confusion attendant thereto, very few Americans realized that this great swindle was being put over. Roosevelt transferred this authority to the State Department and top bureaucrats in that agency vested it, in turn, in a Commission composed of international jug-heads and which is now call­ed GAIT (interpreted by many thoughtful Americans as meaning "Give America the Treatment) and which sits in Geneva and makes decisions concerning imports to the United States which the Constitu .. tion delegated Congress, and Congress alone, to make. When Eisenhower came to office with his big promises to clean up the messes, he not only did not clean up this one but became bogged down in it up to his ears. Instead of attempting to reclaim this authority and help restore it to the American Congress where it belongs, he wholeheartedly approved the GATT arrangement and has asked for an extension of it. Being a thorough-going internationalist, he could hardly be expected to understand the immorality involved in the transfer of Constitutional authority from the American Congress to a Commission in Switzerland composed of one-world eggheads. In the meantime, the two major political parties have ceased to be two separate units with differing views on major issues and have become, instead, one International Socialist Party operating under two names and, having sacrificed the principles which once distinguished them, neither has made the matter a party issue or attempted to erase this disgraceful blot on the integrity and honor of the American gov­erning system. (Continued on Page 2) Millions of Americans Think It-The Southern Conservative Says It Page 2 THE SOUTHERN CONSERVATIVE June, 1957 Negro Says Mor.e Racial Dynamite in Integration Than Appears on Surface Petitions asking that segregation of the races be maintained in the South are being circulated in Memphis and other Southern cities by M. D. Hemphill, Negro, and president of the Mid-South ~u.bhc Relations Bureau. The petltwns are signed by 1,100 colored people who have volunteered to spread the petitions over the Mid-Sol_lth in an attempt to keep segregation in eCfect in all Southern schools and churches. "I was born in Arkansas and reared in the South, and of the thousands of Negroes in all walks of life whom I have interviewed, I have found very few who favor mixed schools" Hemphill said in an interview in the Memphis Com­rriercial Appeal on June 2. "The Southern Negro is in a better position educationally, po· litically and economically than the Negroes anywhere in the world. Race relations are improving steadily. "Despite all the talk about the liberal North and East, no Negro has been made head of a State Col­lege or University. In the South Negro college and university presi~ dents are plentiful. "Negroes need to refresh their memories on the fact that just a few years ago, we were complain­ing because Negroes in the South were being taught by white teach­ers. "This move to integrate the schools in the South is loaded with more racial dynamite than appears on the surface and the Negro is the one who will be blown away. "Nowhere in the integrated states do Negroes get proportion­ate representation. Every device is used to keep qualified Negroes from being assigned. This is not true in the South. The state of Arkansas employs more than 6,- 000 Negro school teachers and pays them more than 13 million dollars in salaries. The state of Georgia employs more than 7,000 Negro teachers and paid them more than 15 million dollars in salaries last year. North Carolina paid Negro teachers 22 million dol­lars last year. "This movement to end segre~ gation in the schools is merely the beginning of a well-laid plan to end segregation completely. If this happens the Negro will be thrown into direct competition with the white race and our business insti­tutions will crumble." Joyce Mew, chairman of the British Housewives' League, Lon­don, compares Prime Minister MacMillan·s Socialist book "The Middle Way·' with Hitler's uMein Kampf." She says it should have been called ';MacMillan's Mein Kampf." She can't understand why a Socialist like MacMillan should be head of England's Conservative Party. We can't either. The Honorable Edgar C. Bundy who, as head of the National Lay­man ·s Council is doing a wonder­ful job of informing the American people concerning the infiltra~ion of Communism into Amencan pulpits says that in the matter of joining Communist fronts, clergy­men outnumbered educators by more than two to one. Supreme Court A'ts to Break Up A 'Conspira,y' The Supreme Court has discov­ered and admitted that a terrible "conspiracy" exists and has taken prompt steps to deal with it. For fear some one may get the wrong idea, this is not a consp.ir­acy against the safety and secunty of the American Republic by alien enemies who are contemptuous of the Constitution and the American form of government, including Swedish Marxists in Stockholm. The Court does not know anything about that conspiracy. This new "conspiracy" has to do with the du-Ponts of Delaware, an American free enterprise concern, which the Court has found guilty of conspiring to upurposely employ their 23 per cent stock interest in General Motors to pry open the G. M. market to entrench itself as the primary supplier of G. M. re­quirements for automotive finishes and fabrics". As a penalty the Court has ordered a "splitup" between the du Pants and General Motors. Of course the du Pants may have committed a heinous crime again"st society by owning 23 per cent of General Motors stock. We just wouldn't know since we don't own a share of anything ourself. In the absence of any knowledge of the subject, we are going to keep on worrying about another "conspiracy" that we do know a lot about. That is the conspiracy of Inter­national Communism which is gradually acquiring a majority of the stock in the American Re­public and we hope that someday, the Supreme Court learns about that one. Hollywood Sends Out Another 'Message' The resentment and indignation against the film "Island in the Sun" reached such proportions in South Carolina that a member of the Legislature there has intro­duced a bill in the legislature to impose a fine of five thousand dollars on any theater in the State showing the picture. The film written by an English "liberal" who knows nothing of the subject of Negroes, is shot through with propaganda for in­tegration of the black and white race and portrays the degenerate practices which such offerings de­light in presenting to the public. Appearing in the film are two Negroes, Harry Belafonte and Dorothy Dandridge and a white female, Joan Fontaine, and the film pairs off white and black for uromance" ~cenes which are enough to turn the stomach of a buzzard. Darryl F. Zanuck of Hollywood who is producing the filthy thing has found it necessary to offer to pay the fine of all motion picture theater operators who show the film in violation of any law which may be passed in the various States. Zanuck is a typical representa­tive of Hollywood "culture" of the brand which undertakes to pre­sent its message through the medi­um of films sponsoring mongreli­zation of the races. "It takes great nations a tvhile to remember that they cannot de­cide things for themselves but must accept the decision of the .majority of all the nations involv­ed."- Eleanor Roosevelt. Spoken like a tried and true Socialist. The Chicago Tribune quotes the late Senator Joe McCarthy as say. ing that uoffering to share our atomic wealth is in a class with the Chicago Police Department offering to share it.! pistols and machine guns with the Dillinger mob." Is the State Department (Contiuued from Page 1) Individual members of the Congress have violently protested the matter and Senator George Malone of Nevada has carried on a one-man campaign for years to get thi_s a~hority re~tored to Con~ess and has held hearings in connection w1th It and testimony concermng the harm~ ful effects of the plan on American industry covers hundreds of thousands of pages in official government files, but nothing happens, Meantime, many American business concerns have who are un­able to .compete with foreigners in whose favor the whole thing is rigged have gone out of business. This is especially true in the case of the mining and metals industry and one entire village in t~e State of Wash- ~~f~~~dwt~0~fo~c~~~:rh:~n1:~:~~~~!s °Fro~P~~~·ic':,h~?111~o~~~;~~~ become another "ghost town". Recently the Associated Press carried a Holden, Washington, dateline stating that nearly one hundred private homes there which cost an average of $3,000 were being sold for chick~ en houses at one dollar each and being carted away by the purchasers, as practically all residents of the town prepar-e to move elsewhere. Recently a bill has been introduced in Congress by Representative Cleveland M. Bailey of West Virginia and others which would fix the import quotas to be allowed in this country as a means of estabJishing some sort of regulation of foreign commerce. Immediately the State Department set up a howl of protest on the theory, ~resumably, that ~ongr~ss '":'as infrin~ing on the _§.~ate Depart~ ment's nght to enact tanff leg1slahon and, mstead of 1.5emg laughed out of the picture, that agency's arguments are apparently being given great weight by members of Congress whose capacity to think for themselves has long been surrendered along with other fundamental rights. The Secretary of State himself, of course, said nothing as he was buzzing around in the air over some foreign country. He seldom lights on the ground long enough in Washington to discuss anythinJ, but one of his assistants came through with this clincher: "This Department believes that the President alone is in position to weigh the various considerations of domestic and foreign policy which should be taken into account before any measure potentiaJJy as far-reaching in its impact on our foreign relations as an import quota, is established ... The enactment of this legislation would not be in ac· cord with the program of the President". These are not merely the impudent words of some little squirt in the State Department who wrote them but the established policy of the administration and of the Federal government in relation to the pro· tection and the welfare of American Free Enterprise, as opposed to its deep concern in that of foreign business ventures. And imagine the audacity of the State Department's claim that only the President is in position to decide the matter when nowhere in the Constitution is the President mentioned in the delegation of this author .. Hy to Congress. Congressman Bailey, <>n receipt of the message, paid his respects t~ the State Department in well-chosen words, none of which were comph~ mentary. That agency, he said, would "drive Congress out of its own domain and reduce it to a state of mumbling futility" ..• What notion the Department could have about the functions of Congress as defined in the Constitution "must remain a mystery unless the Department holds the Constitution and the people whose rights it defines, in very low esteem", he said and added: "Congress cannot renounce doing what the Constitution says it is to do. Nor can it authorize the executive to make international agree­ments that will impair, ensnarl or compromise this express power fixed by the Constitution". Congressman Bailey is exactly right in his premise that this can­not legally be done but the cold fact remains that it is being done and the execu~ive. is, through the State Department, exercising functions that Conshtut10nally belong to the Congress. It is like the Negro who phoned his lawyer that he had committed a certain offense and had i~~~~~oir~la~~;·~ou~~~~h ~~~'ia~~~ ~~~l!~dj:a•i·~~{, b~~!:' It'~=~~~~~~·~~~ from the jail". Th~ average American shies away from disc~ssions concern!ng the tar1~f and ~buns it as a subject that is complicated, uninterestmg an~ bonng. This may be true but the principle involved in the present t~r.Iff set-up in which our country is involved is something that every c1bzen needs to study, to understand and to protest. . It bo~ls d?wn to th.e simple fact that the right of Congress to pass !anff legtsla~wn and ftx duties on imports, which responsibility was Imposed on It by the Constitution, has been surrendered and is now in the hands of a bunch of internationalists in Geneva. Every citizen can understand that. Th~s surrender of its Constitutional functions by the Congress ~f the Umted States a~d the side-stepping of its delegated function_s IS not onl:y tr!?ason. but 1s a long step toward preparation of the American Repubhc for qu1et burial in an international graveyard. a: sl Sl tt p. ol ti is •I c A cl to Sl it R Cl P< fr jo !r cc c at h< In sn re th h) m ce pt st R< Ft i7 June, 1957 THE SOUTHERN CONSERVATIVE Page l We Think Chinese Attack on The Embassy Was ·'Planned' Bring on the Pacts and We Will Sign on the Dotted Line When we remind ourselves that --------­nothing ever happens any more and that everything is "planned that way" so far as matters af­fecting government in the United States are concerned, we may be better able to evaluate the inci­dent of the attack on the Ameri­can Embassy by Nationalist Chi­nese. There have been about as many reasons advanced for this out­break as there are persons who have sought to analyze the inci­cident, and since we always have a definite opinion about such mat­ters, and no hesitation about ex­pressing it, we offer our sugges­tion concerning the affair, f~r what it is worth. We think it was planned to soften up opposition to the admis­sion of Red China to the United Nations. It must be remembered that the sympathy of the people of the United States is with Chiang Kai­Shek, friend of this country and uncompromising enemy of Com­munism, and attempts to adm~t Red China to the U. N. would shr up a veritable hornet's nest of op­position here. Secretary of State Dulles is on record as saying, in 1950, that the United Nations, to be a represen­tative world organization, must ac­cept all nations as members and that this included Red China. Mr. Eisenhower has said many times that he would oppose the admis­sion of Red China to the United Nations, because he dared not say otherwise, but he has always qual~ ified it by saying 11at this time". Well, time is running short and the pressure from England, Fr.ance and other Marxist nations as well as from American Reds is getting stronger and the administration can resist anything except pres­sure from left-wingers, fellow travel1ers and Communist sym­pathizers. So long as the public sentiment of the United States is with Na­tiona1ist China, tbe administration is behind the eight-ball so far as agreement to the admission of Red China into the U. N. i.s concerned. But a few more attacks on Americans in Formosa co u 1 d change the picture with respect to our attitude toward Chiang Kai­Shek's little flowery kingdom and its people and there are plenty of Reds in Formosa, just as in this ~~~d~J·o~h~it~a~ fi1ill:y~r~~d~e~ from the proper source to get the job done. When we become thoroughly irked with the Nationalists, we be­come, ergo, more tolerant with the Chinese Reds on the mainland, and less shocked at the idea of that heathen country being accepted into the "Brotherhood of Nations". And if any one is inclined to smile at this analysis, let them remember that China was sold to the Communists in the first place by Pro·Reds in the State Depart­ment in Washington and that e':· cept for these under-cover mam~ pulations, Chiang Kai-Shek would still be President of the Chinese Republic instead of an exile on Formosa. Ciirard Case Represents Surrender of Principle If there is any maximum depth to which this country can fall in its surrender to, and appeasement of, foreign nations, that point would seem to have been reached with the surrender of William S. Girard, an American soldier to the tender mercies of a Japanese Court in his trial for accidental murder of a Niponese woman. The hearts of American mothers will be filled with greater anguish than ever at the prospect of their sons being drafted into the armed forces and then having the protec­tion of the Flag of the country for which they serve taken away from them in their hour of peril. If so many similar instances of appeasement had not shocked the citizenship, it would be difficult to realize that such utter surrender of principle by Washington lead­ers has been made. E. G. Schulze of Dallas makes the point that Betsey, the Balti­more chimpanzee who is doing a land office business with her paint­ings, should be aUowed to go to school with white children. Other­wise he fears that she may get an inferiority complex. He sug­gests that there be formed a Na­tional Association for the Ad­vancement of Chimpanzees and that this organization file suit in the Supreme Court to put an end to segregation in the Baltimore Zoo where Betsey lives. Enjoining A Corpse (The Dallas Morning News) According to Ida M. Darden, editor of the Southern Conserva­tive (Fort Worth), the Supreme Court "opened a casket and post­humously enjoined a corpse from disposing of his own private pro­perty." Miss Darden works it out this way: Stephen Girard died in 1831. His will said that Girard College should have his estate and should be open to male white orphans as students. The Supreme Court opens it to colored orphans as well. ~<Desecrating the dead," Miss Darden calls it. Sometimes you al­most get the notion that that young woman doesn't fully ap­prove of the Supreme Court, any­how. (Editor's note: With the exception of using the terms "Miss" and "young", the Dallas Morning News is exadly right. We certainly do not ap­prove of the Supreme Court as pres­ently constituted.) The joke of the year: uThere may be some cynics who think that a platform is just a list of platitudes to lure the naive voter -a sort of facade behind which candidates sneak into power and then do as they please. I am not one of those."-Dwight D. Eisen­hower "in press in~.erview June 6. Borrowing Money to Give Away Is Downright Dishonest by Any Test . Those who have felt sure that our "economy-minded Congress" was going · to slash the disgrace~ fully high appropriations bil1 sub­mitted to them by the President had better not let their hopes soar too high because it may all turn out to be nothing more than a big blast of hot air. Already several members of the Senate who have screamed the· loudest about the matter are be­ginning to weaken and to suggest in the press that maybe some of the items they cut out should be restored and this means that they are probably already whipped into line because of some threat or promise adroitly whispered to them by the proper persons. After they returned from their Easter vacation at home, where they got an earful from taxpayers about the subject, they kept the headlines hot with threats to whittle the appropriations bill down to size but, having gone on record for the benefit of the folks back home, they will probably get back to their horse-trading and vote for the bill at practically tl}e original figures. On top of the unprecedented appropriations bill already before the Congress, the President is about to ask for $32,350,000 for constructing a new Presidential office building to house the Army of advisers which the chief execu­tive requires in running the job, to say nothing of the $149,500,000 additional funds which he request­ed Congress on June 3 to approp­riate for the Postoffice Depart­ment, to "avoid a severe cutback in mail service." Wanton spending has become a mania in Washington and it is doubtful that it can be checked until Congress re-assumes its re­sponsibility to disburse public money in the same careful manner in which they handle their own personal funds. It doesn't take much imagina­tion to picture their consternation if they were compelled to person­ally borrow money to lend to their poor relatives and friends but that is exactly what they are doing with taxpayers' money. They have no moral right to vote one thin dime of "foreign aid" so long as this country is nearly $:lOO,OOO,OOO,OOO.OO in debt be­cause one of the soundest and old­est axioms in human history is the one which tells us that "char­ity begins at home." Giving money to foreign coun­tries- for that is what it amounts to inevitably-while the head of this government admits that our own governmental agencies are financially unable to perform their constitutional functions, is not only unsound and indefensible business procedure but is down­right dishonest, by any standard of ethics prevailing in civilized so­ciety. On June 3, the United Press car­ried a story with a Karachi, Pakis­tan, dateline announcing the joy­ful news that the United States had formally joined the Baghdad Pact military committee and had thereby "promised to carry its full share of responsibilities" in defense of the Pact's Middle East Nations. This is no doubt a relief to American taxpayers who had probably feared that they would be denied the privilege of finan .. cing any squabble that may take place in that area. The article stated further that the invitation for the United States to ioin this military com­mittee was extended on the morn~ ing of June 3 and was accepted that same afternoon with the State Department's Loy Hender­son taking care of the details. There was no explanation as to the long delay and why we hesi­tated three or four hours before accepting the invitation to join up, but Henderson made up for our tardiness in accepting the bid by assuring the Pact's Council of Ministers in session in Karachi that it was a "great honor" for us to become a member and that "the United States expects to car­ry its full share of responsibilities in this important mattter".• Since we have only around ten thousand treaties, executive agree­ments and pacts with foreign na­tions in many of which we promise to finance and fight. their warsr i.t would have been quite a reflection on our international spirit of brotherhood if we had failed to get in on this one. One of the thousands of Boards, Commissions or Bureaus in Wash~ ington should be compelled to read all the pacts, treaties and execu­tive agreements to which the Uni­ted States has been committed by irresponsible politicians in order that the people may know how deeply involved they and their children and their children's chil­dren are in the. generations to When Franklin D. Roosevelt put the nation on the dole in 1933 he gave his aword of honor" to the Governors of the various States that this was only temporary and that as soon as the uemergency" was over, this Socialist procedm·e would be abandoned. He said this in order to get the Governors to cooperate in the program by pass­ing bond issues in each State to match Federal funds. On this June 6, a 36-year-old New York woman received the lO,OOO,OOOth check under our dole system and quite a ceremony was held to celebrate the event. Marion B. Folsom, Welfare Chief presented the check and President Eisenhower wrote the woman a letter telling her she could accept the check ''proudly." That is certainly investing the word upride" with a different meaning from its original defini­tion which was "self-esteem" and uzofty self-respect.·~ Poge 4 The Southern Conservative A MONTHLY PUBLICATION OF EDITORIAL OPINION WITH NATIONAL CIRCULATION IDA M. DARDEN, Editor Editorial Offices Flatiron Building Fort Worth, Texas Phone ED 2.2089 Price $5.00 Per Year (Every paid subscriberl•entitledtoone fr .. subscription to be sent to any person of his choosing.) Sent without cost to members of Congren, member• of Sto11te Legislatures, Governor1, and other public officials, A helpless sparrow can drift with the wind but it takes an eagle to fly against the storm. THE TENTH AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES: The powers not delegated to the United States by the Conditution, nor prohibited byitlotheStatesarereservedtothe Stetesrespeditely,ortotheveople. White House Opposed to Right of Trial by Jury The President has officially gone on record as opposed to the Ameri­can people's traditional right of trial by jury. When Senator Erwin of North Caroline tacked on such an amendment to the Civil Rights atrocity which the administra­tion is determined to put through Congress, the White House lobbyists announced that this was displeasing to Mr. Eisen~ hower and added that it was not felt that a Southern jury would be fair in its decision concerning civil rights of Negroes. And because a man in the White House does not have faith in Southerners to administer justice, he proposes to abolish the Consti­tutional right of Trial by Jury which is basic law of this country and has been since the Republic was founded. The Southern people were never the recipients of any more humili­ating insults by carpetbag•s dur­Jng and following the Civil War than are being heaved at them right now by the forces of Modern Republicanism in Washington. Better Men Have Been Hung for Less Than This This little incident, reported in a Chicago newspaper, clipping of which was sent us, did not happen in Russia, Poland, Hungary or even Yugoslavia. It happened in Chicago. H. Alan Long, district internal revenue director accused Clarence L. Hayes, Jr., a florist of owing $80.06 on his 1951 income tax. Internal revenue agents armed with an administrative warrant is­sued by Long, descended on Hayes' florist shop one night recently. They opened the florist's cash reg­ister, took out $80.96 and handed Hayes a "paid in full" receipt, punched the "no sale" key and de­parted. Apparently all the gangsters in Chicago are not operating in the windy city'• underground. THE SOUTHERN CONSERVATIVE June, 1957 Supreme Court Authority Pakistan Visitor Knocks Foreign Moves 1n to Conquor Asia Aid Program Into A Cocked Hat Officials of the American State Department, which has a world­wide reputation for generosity with taxpayers money, brought a prominent Pakistanian official to this country as their guest early in June. They probably wish now that they had left him at his home base, or that they had, at least, sent one of their numerous public re­lations boys along with him on his trip over the country to monitor his press interviews. At Dallas on June 6 this Pakistanian, Mr. Shamsul Huda Chaud~ bury, proceeded to toss a nice little bomb right into the State Depart­ment's foreign propaganda program by letting it be known through the columns of the Dallas Morning News that such propaganda, so far as his country is concerned, adds up to less than nothing. The Swedish Marxist, Gunnar Myrdal, whose domination of Su~ preme Court verdicts has reversed social customs of a century in the United States, is out to conquer new worlds. Resigning as Secretary of the United Nations Economic Commis .. sion for Europe after ten years, he is now the representative of the pink Twentieth Century Fund and will barge into Asia to "direct an economic study of Southeast Asia" in an "impartial professional ap-­proach to controversial subjects of public concern." The Twentieth Century Fund is He said that the people of the Far East have the distinct impression ~~e!p~ev;~n~;than~e F~~~e;at:~~; that the millions of dollars which this country sends them as foreign which are working around the aid is just spare change lying around loose in the pockets of American clock to redistribute the wealth of millionaires for which they have no need and which they just give i~~l~~~~ :~: t~~:dal~t~~~~t~~~ away to get rid of it. Internaticnal Socialism, Commun~ r'Many Asian countries have the idea that the $50,000,000 given to . ism or whatever it is called. them would have been wasted any way" Mr. Chaudhury frankly told w~~~cet~;~e'~A~:[i~~nb~il=~~:~ a News reporter, and he added that while America was always send- book adopted by the American Su~ ing them mi11ions of dollars, the people of Asia know nothing of Amer- preme Court as its authority for ica or Americans "because there is not enough publicity about Amer- decisions on integration, the Swed­ica in the Far East". ish Marxist has written another After giving this black eye to Mr. Dulles' little pet USIA program, which administration officials have insisted was publicising the United States all over the world, Mr. Chaudhury remembered something else, too. He said that, incidentally, it might be a good thing to let the Asian people know that Americans do sometimes listen to good music as the only thing his people had ever heard from the United States was rock 'n roll jazz. The unfortunate part of the whole thing is that Mr. Chaudhury could not have been invited to appear before Congress which is consid­ering State Department demands for $144,000,000 for its USIA program in order that it may send bigger and better rock 'n roll jazz bands all over the world to familiarize the people of foreign countries with "American culture". 'Charity' Funds Discontinued To Racial Propagandists The Fort Worth United Fund, or Community Chest, has an­nounced that from now on, the Urban League will not receive any of the money donated by the peo­ple of Fort Worth for "charity". There has been a lot of opposi~ tion during the past year to the idea of money intended for the benefit of the needy going to a branch of a national propaganda organization which seeks to mix the races in housing, schools and golf courses. A lot of literature protesting the donation of funds by this charitable group to the League was distributed to business firms throughout the cjty. · We are very proud of the fact, however, that we were the first to protest the matter over three years ago when we refused to give our small contribution to solici­tors for the United Fund and told them the reasons for our refusal. They looked at us as if they thought we were slightly out of our mind and later sent others to whip us into line but we never budged. We published the record of the Urban League in several editions of the paper but it was only after opposition from one small, in­significant person had burgeoned into resentment from hundreds that officials of the Fund gave in and removed the League from their list of beneficiaries. We only wish that many other evil things which we protest would end as successfully. America $peaks (By H. I. Phillips) To meet both ends I .seldom can (But I'm a help to Pakistan); It's hard to keep my shirt and pants (But after all, I'm fond of France); I guess I'll have to break my lease (I must cooperate with Greece); Hedged in by debts quite vast I am (But I must not neglect Siam). The wolf from door I can't repel (Still I must help keep Burma well); By Tuesday I am out of dough (Malaya's feeling better, though); My dollar very little buys (But Egypt's safer, I surmise); My own financial outlook's murky (But still my heart belongs to Turkey). I'm busted flat, and feeling blue (But I'm a pal of Timbuktu); We're adding breadcrumbs to our hash (Who cares? Ain't Tito short of cash?); The sheriff's knocking on my door {However, England's asking more); I'm in a hole, but feeling noble I wish things were not quite so global! The Congress wa.! advised re­cently by the State and Defense Department that 450 missing American service men of the Ko­rean war must "be presumed to be dead." If they are, they probably died of old age while waiting for their country to rescue them from the enemy. book called "An International Economy" in which Marx' and Lenin's theories are presented as sound principles on which all gov~ ernments must eventually be based. In this book he advocates For~ eign Aid as a way "to level the peaks and fill the valleys" or in other words to redistribute the wealth of America between for~ eign nations thereby putting all countries on the same basis. He says also that a strong point which the Communists can use in the development of under-developed countries is the fact that they "have succeeded in exterminating racial prejudices in their minds". Commenting on this statement the Richmond, Virginia, News~ Leader says: ''The man who wrote that is either a fool or a cynic. For he overlooks the simple truth that the unprejudiced Communists will confer the misery of their system on any unlucky people, whether they are white, black, yellow or red." One reason Myrdal may have wanted to go to Asia is because his old lady, Alva Myrdal, was ap­pointed by the Socialist govern~ ment of ~weden in 1955 as Am~ bassador to India, Burma and Cey­lon and she could still be there. She is the one who, in UNESCO literature, makes the cozy little suggestion that, when . there are not enough men to go around, a "community household" be set up with a whole flock of women shar~ ing the same husband. "Sharing the Wealth" is j~st part of the Gunnar Myrdal famlly philosophy. They believe in shar· ing everything, it seems. How the people of the United States can accent calmly the fact that a low-lived foreigner like this Myrdal is allowed to dictate the policies of the American govern .. ment is beyond us. The Canada Council, with $100,~ 000,000 to its credit ia setting out to bring uculture" to that great Dominion. Canadians had better watch this outfit. "Culture" groups seem to provide an effective med .. ium for Communist activity; at least that's the way it is in the United States. At their first meet­ing the Council had representa­tives there from the Rocke~eller, Ford, and Carnegie Foundat~ons. '57 >ar )u~ :ed he :he jg. he :he nd an ia" 'I'" of . is ms :he of es, 1to OV• be .use ap­~ rn· \m· :ey· ;co .ttle are a, a ~~;. just nily har- 1 ted rract this the wo,­out eat ~ttflr :;~ups ned· ; at the June, 1957 THE SOUTHERN CONSERVATIVE Poge 5 Questions to Which the American People Should Demand An Answer Last February 15, 16 and 17 there was a highly secret meeting of per· sons in high authority in the United State&, Canada and Europe which attains more sinister proportions as information concerning It is gradually acquired. It was held at the King and Prince Hotel in St. Simons Island not far ott the Georgia Coast, and all travelers who tried to get accommo­dations at the hotel during this time were denied admittance and told that the entire hotel had been reserved by this secret group. There have been various estimates of the number attending this meeting from 60 to 91, but that it not too important. It Js who attended It and why they were ihere, and why they were hiding out and avoiding pub~ liclty which is of interest. Twenty~one of the "delegates" refused to register their names and the whole thing was shrouded in an aura of mystery which is uncalled for In any gathering un~ less there is something about the con­clave of which those attending are ashamed. One thing that Is known Is that all of them were internationalists and that none of them have ever been Identified with any movement devol~ ed to promoting Americanism. As to the foreigners who were present, all of them were Socialists interested in one-world government. Why were these foreign Socialists at this meet~ ing and in conference with highly­plac~ d American dignitaries? Since there is not much chance of any publicity concerning the gather­ing being released at this late date, all those who feel apprehension about the matter should write the White House, the members of the House and Senate and any other contacts they may have in Washington to see if they can dig up a few facts con­cerning this clandestine meeting on St. Simons Island last February. Somebody, or some group, planned the meeting and called it. What person or group was it? How many were invited and who were they? How many attended and who were they? Some pinkos of the publishing in· dustry were there but wrote nothing about it in their publications. Why? Who presided at the meeting, what 11ubject or subjects did tltcy discuss Pnd what decisions did they reach? The White House, the Central In· telligence Agency and the Senate were among the official agencies reported to have had representation there. Aren't the taxpayers entitled to know if this is true and who the repre­sentatives were? Does another secret meeting which has been called to meet in Vienna from August 15 to September 15 have any relation to the on$ held at St. Simons Island in Georgia and will the same persons who attended the Georgia meeting be present at the Austrian gathering. Does the fact that the Atomic Energy Board is meeting Jn Vienna at the same time have any connection with the secret meeting which has been called for that city on that date? Something is being hatched up at these secret meetings which inevit~ ably must aUect the people of the United States. What is it? Slim GOP Pickin's (Dallas Morning News) The Republican National Committee held six regional party meetings, then went to the President and told him the results: Big donors to the party are balking. The pickin's are slim for campaigning. There is no money, because regular contributors are mad about the big budget from the White House. The big budget is only one maniles· tation of Republican troubles. Most Republicans are conservative. They are disappointed in Mr. Eisenhower's shilt tQ.. the left. They worked their hearts out for an ideal in 1952 and the ideal is somewhat shattered. Hence-no enthusiasm for giving. But GOP National Chairman Meade Alcorn assured the President "they'll come at·ound." Of course, they have no place else to go. Their choice is to stick with the half-liberal Eisenhower or the whole-liberal ADA-CIO com­bine which seeks to dominate Demo~ cratlc Party policy. Conservative Democrats, incidentally, face the same dilemma. Ford Foundation Fittingly Drifts Behind Iron Curtain The Ford Foundation has finally followed its heart and has gone behind the Iron Curtain to make one of its notorious grants. This one is for the sum of $500,- 000 and is made to Cg_rn u ist Poland. It is to be used in w at Foundation officials explain as a "two-way" exchange of students between Poland and the United States. What this actually means, of course, is that young Polish Com~ munists will come to the United States to indoctrinate American youth and that young American students will go to Poland and get their brains washed there, provid­ed, of course, that the job has not already been accomplished by the College or University to which they are attached. It's a "two-way" deal all right; both of them rotten. It should be constantly kept in mind that the Ford Foundation is granted tax-exemption by the Fed­eral Treasury and escapes the hor­rible tax burden imposed on those who are not fortunate enough to have their money protected by a tie-in with a "benevolent" and "non-political" Foundation. There have been brave attempts made by Committees of Congress to expose the real objectives of the large tax-exempt Foundations like Ford, Rockefeller and Carnegie but the latter are more powerful than government itself and have been able to load such committees so heavily with subversives that the investigations turn out to be no more effective than a burp in a whirlwind. If by some miracle the original Henry Ford could only return to this mundane sphere for thirty days, he would make an omelet out of those cracked egg-heads who are •pending the money which hi• brains and genius accumulated to project the ideals of International Communism into all sectors of the earth. Reds Putting Heaviest Artillery Into Fight on Immigration Law Texas Law Professor AttacksCiovernment' s Security Program A professor of law at the Univer­sity of Texas, Dr. Jerre Williams, thinks so little of the Government's security regulations that he is making speeche-s against the program. On May 21 he addressed the Austin League of Women Voters, local di­vision of the National League which is partial to speakers who make such discussions. "The whole program is built on guilt by association" the professor parroted, mechanically quotb1g what many certain Fifth Amendment Am­ericans have said before him. ''The great danger here is assum­ing that a person ls in agreement with his associates." If the good professor were not a victim of P~:ogressive Education , he would have been taught some good American maxims including the one which says "birds of a feather flock together." Also, if he had followed the record of all those who have been investigated by the House Un-Amer­ican Activities Committee and who took the Fifth Amendment, he would find that they don't invoke this amendment out of principle but out of guilt and fear. Williams strongly defended the right of "confrontation" by the indi­vidual under investigation and in­sisted that the government should produce ill! OU.l'C of information and open up government files to the ac­cused. Williams talk is unimportant or would be except for his connection with the University of Texas. With so many burning questions to dis~ cuss and clarify, it is unfortaunate when a representative of a large Institution of learning directs hia ef~ forts toward weakening the Ameri­can government's security program. The Communists Have all The Detads Figured Out Kenneth Goff, former Commun~ ist, has made a signed affidavit concerning his activities from May 2 1936 when he became a party ~ember until he resigned October 9, 1939. The things he was compelled to take part in would Hcurl your hair" but perhaps the most revolt­ing was his instruction in the art of poisoning the water supply of whole cities. "We discussed quite thoroughly the flouridation of water supplies and how we were using it in Rus­sia as a tranquilizer in the prison camps," Goff attests in his affi. davit. "The leaders of our school felt that if it could be Introduced into the American water supply, it would bring about a spirit of leth­argy in the nation; it would keep the general public docile during a steady encroachment of Commun· ism. We also discussed the fact that keeping a supply of deadly flouride near the water reservoir would be advantageous during the time of the revolution ... We dis­cussed fn these schools . • . the seizure of the main utilities, such as light, power, gas and water but it was felt by the leadership that if a program of flouridation of the water could be carried out in the The American Legion that great guardian of American liberties has warned of the Red drive against the McCarren-Walter law which is going into high gear with the in­troduction of legislation in Con· gress designed to break down all safeguards placed in that law for the protection of our internal se­curity. The situation is dangerous in the extreme, according to the Legion, because the Reds have moved in their heaviest artillery for the fight against this law. The Legion pointed out the in­cident last year when skillful par­liamentary manipulators tacked on an amendment to a minor biH which would have greatly emas­culated the McCarran-Walter act. Fortunately this deception was discovered by Congressman Fran­cis Walter of Pennsylvania, one of the authors of the present :aw and who is constantly on the alert against attempts of subversives to destroy it. The Legion wants no repetition of the incident in the last Congress when the Reds almost won a vic­tory. Florida Wants Review Of Court Decisions Congress has been memorialized by the Legislature of the State of Florida concerning ma tters which are of such pressing import that they should have priority over all other measures be­fore that body. In this memor inl it is earnestly urged that tlie Senate o!The United States comprise a Court with final appellate jurisdiction to review de­cisions and judgments of the Supreme Court of the United States, where questions involving the powers re­served to the States are concerned. Under this memorial the clecisioil of the Senate aUirming, modifying or reversing a Supreme Court de·: ision would be finaL The Congress is requested t.:~ .'Wb~ mit an amendment to this effect for ratification by three~!ourths of the several States. In a second memorial to Congre.u by -!.!_le Florida Legislature our na~ tiona! lawmaking body is r rq w.>.;ted to propose such amendments io the Constitution of the United States , to provide that among the rights and powers reserved to each State are the police powers to enact l'egt:lations to promote the public peace, !""lfety and welfare of the State and to pro~ vide for good order, education And harmonious race relations therein. Whether these memorials will re­ceive the consideration which they deserve in view of the rapld em:nach­ment of the Federal government on. the Rights of States, Is not clear since, at the time theae memorials were received, both Houses of the Congress were deeply involved in debate on the President's civil rights bill which proposes to wipe out States Rights altogether by abolishing such basic American safeguards as 4\B right of trial by jury. In other words, all States Rights may be completely wiped out before members of Congress get time to look at this urgent plea !or their preservation. ~~~~tth1: ~0v~1~c~~:n\0~f t';;:Yr!~= elution. The affidavit was signed and no­tarized in Arapa_hoe County, Colo­rado, on the 29th of last March. P•go 6 Who Thrust World Leadership on Us? Editor'a note: The following edi­torial Is from the Reese River Reville, Austin, Nevada, the oldest newspaper in that State and which has been pub­lished every week since 1863. Jock Taylor Is the editor and publisher and we commend his views on this important subject to the thoughtful consideration of heads of metropoli­tan newspapers who could emulate the frank editorial discussion in this small weekly paper to the distjnct benefit of their readers. World leadership is a term that has a grandiloquent solind as mouthed continuously by the group in Washington and else­where that profits most in person­al glory and otherwise by seeking to maintain it as a national fetich. Not so many years ago, and for a long time previous, that world leadership was claimed by Great Britain, which however had the good sense or good taste to make no claim that such leadership had been thrust upon it. On the con­trary, Great Britain claimed it by right of achievement. Today, what has become of the British Empire that was bunt up on the foundation of that world leadership? Bit by bit it has been sheared away until virual­ly nothing remains of it, and England has dropped back to the position it occupied before Drake smashed the Spanish Armada and England's advance toward world leadership commenced. In our case it is different. For some reason whatever leadership we have at the moment seems un­able to adopt any position without attaching to 1t some form of moral­ity basis. Hence, it is made to ap­pear that our world leadership is founded on a divine mandate to uplift the morals and way of life of the rest of the world. Certainly this nation, the first part of the British Empire to spllt away from the mother country, was not founded on any such con­ception. The purpose of those who established it and drafted its Con­stitution was to give its people individual liberty and freedom to develop their own interests with­out intereference from outside. The Constitution made no reference to, and had no interest in, world lead­ership. It laid down the working r::no~~ ~~:t!~~s t~~~ w;~;~i~i~~ others to do the same. We have departed far from that basic conception. During the past quarter of a century the Constitu­tion has been largely replaced by the visions of various types of pseudo-sciences - so-called social sciences in particular. Such mind­ers of other people's business en­tered the modern field as social workers and similar meddlers dur­Ing the days of the great depres· slon. Under the spend and elect, WPA and other innovations of that period which sent us far in the direction of a socialist central gov­ernment, they gained an ever , stronger hold over our socalled statesmen, working their way into key positions of government and extending their "welfare" activi­ties from the local to the interna­tional field. To them primarily we owe the conception of world leadership that we are developing Into a Frankenstein monster, one we have built up and are maintain· fng without justification. Our claim that world leadership is THE SOUTHERN CONSERVATIVE June, 1957 Reds Reported Buying Into Woman Senator Must Learn A American Defense Concerns h · A recent article in the press Lot Before She Knows Anyt mg with a Geneva dateline should cause serious concern in this coun­try but probably won't. The Geneva correspondent of NANA press service reports that Iron Curtain money has been flow­ing into Swiss banks in a steadily mounting volume during the past year, and that it is being put to "dangerous uses". Because of Swiss banking law which permits depositors to use only a code number for identifica­tion and enables them to keep their identity secret, that little country has become an "in­triguer's paradise" the corres­pondent writes, and adds that bil­lions of dollars are carried in these accounts. He reports that shortly after the Geneva " s u m m i t" conference, Kruschchev and other Russian leaders started depositing huge sums with Swiss banks and that the Chinese Communists also have made large deposits in these secret accounts. Since the Swiss government jealously protects the secrecy sur­rounding banking methods in that country, information concerning these transactions is difficult to obtain but the article reveals that informed persons in Geneva who were willing to discuss the matter believe that the Communists are using these secret accounts to buy into American industrial concerns and especially those of military importance. In view of the fact that the United Nations is stacked with their spies, to say nothing of their agents in defense plants which the late Senator McCarthy exposed, it would seem rather unnecessary for the Communists to go to this · extra expense but they lay their plans carefully and leave nothing to chance. A Yugoslav miner has named his twin sons Nasser and Nehru. With such a handicap, they will both probably turn out to be train rob· bers. thrust upon us is not one that can be substantiated. On the contrary, such leadership is something our theorists are trying unsuccessfully to seize for us. We are forcing our money on foreign governments, re­gardless of whether they want it or not- and many of them don't. Using our money as a key, we are at the same time trying to force on other governments our ideas of how they should live and conduct themselves - which is something none of them want. We have become an internation· al Meddling Mattie. We are inter­fering with the internal affairs of other governments in a manner that would be deeply resented by us should they reverse the pro­cedure and try to tell us how to live. The great problem that con­fronts us, if we are ever to live in peace again, is not how to uplift the rest of the world, but how to mind our own business, both at home and abroad. How lito Is Showing His Gratitude for Our Gifts On May 31, Honorable Law­rence H. Smith of Wisconsin intro­duced into the Congressional Record certain information which would have once made our hair stand on end, but which in the gen­eral immorality which engulfs the nation, probably passed unnoticed. As everybody knows, or should know, we are helping to support among other nations, Communist Yugoslavia and are supplying them with money, jet planes and other war material which could conceivably be used in fighting us, when and if, they get around to it. At any rate, Congressman Smith had reproduced in the Record a news release from the INS cor­respondent in Belgrade who told how, during a guided tour of the Yugoslavian port of Rijeka re­cently, he slipped away to make a little side trip of his own. He re­ported that he saw dock workers inking out the letters U. S. A. on packages which had just arrived from New York and re-addressing them to Hong Kong. Between cracks and openings in the boxes, this correspondent could see precision hand and simi­lar small tools and a dock worker who could speak some English told him they were bound for Red China. This dock worker said the tools had been shipped from New York to Belgrade in a ship flying the Nigerian Flag. He said that such shipments were common as Rijeka is a free port and customs inspectors were easy. The correspondent was also told that the port was receiving much air-sea radar equipment and ship radio instruments and similar gear from the Radio Corporation of America. All pride, if any, which women may have felt at having a member of their sex sit in the United States Senate has been cancelled out by the crude, ill-bred and in­excusable performance of the only female occupant of a seat in that body. Margaret Chase Smith of Maine who was elected to the job fol­lowing a long stretch as a tele­phone operator in the little town of Skowhegan, made a pitiful spectacle of herself when she flat­ly refused to join with all others of a committee of which she is a member to sign a formal letter of condolence to the widow of Senator Joseph R. McCarthy of Wisconsin who died recently. Signing this communication would not have ·committed Mrs. Smith to endorsement of Senator McCarthy's fight on Communism -no one would expect her to com­prehend, much less approve, this type of service to the Republic. However, they would expect her-through association at least -to have become familiar by now with ordinary courtesies and nor-· mal conventions which must be observed under such circum-stances. Expressing sympathy for the family of the dead is merely a polite gesture indulged in by civil­ized people and reflects one of the customs which distinguish human beings from the lower animals. In this connection, there are widespread expressions of regret that Mrs. McCarthy refused to let her name be considered in con­nection with the office which her illustrious husband held and it is felt that she would have reflected honesty, integrity and ability in the post. Also, in that event, we would have had a great lady in the Sen­ate. Conservatives Win Smashing Victory Over Pearson No Propaganda The victory of the Conservatives in the recent election in Canada over Lester Pearson's Liberal, or Intern·ational Socialist party, is very encouraging. It is understood that the Nor­man case played a very important part in the campaign there. Be­cause Pearson strongly ·defend­ed Norman even in view of his record as having been associated with Communists and with pro­moting Communist aims during his entire public career, he made e n em i e s of anti-Communists throughout the Dominion. An amusing aspect of the elec­tion was a statement by Trade Minister C. D. Howe who was swept out of office along with the rest of the "Liberals" and who described the swing to Conserva­tives as "a kind of disease going across the country." If that is correct, let us pray that the disease becomes epidemic and that it spreads throughout the United States, as well as Canada. T1l our friends and subscribers in Canada who were kind enough to send us copies of literature dis­tributed during the campaign, and especially to two good friends in the House of Commons in Otta­wa, we say congratulations for a job well done. Behind Iron Curtain Joseph Z. Cornfedder, writing in the Methodist Challenge, gives some interesting information which should not have been sur­prising to us or any other inform­ed person, but was. He says that while United Na­tions agencies such as UNESCO operate freely among parent, teacher, and other citizens groups in the United States and other Western Countries spreading U.N. propaganda, not one iota of activ­ity along this line is carried on in Russia and other Iron Curtain Countries. He points out that while hun­dreds of tons of printed propagan­da is distributed by various U. N. agencies, to schools in Western Countries, principally the United States, no such activity is permit­ted under any circumstances in Moscow or any Russian satellite city. He didn't say so, but we assume, also, that Communist countries behind the Iron Curtain do not have a female counterpart of Eleanor Roosevelt flitting around like a Junebug trying to work up sentiment in favor of the United Nations and its one-world govern­ment scheme. June, 1957 THE SOUTHERN CONSERVATIVE Page 7 ~ Texans Hope Anderson Won't Muff His Chance at Greatness Robert B. Anderson named by the President as the new Secre­tary of the Treasury was one of Texas' most outstanding citizens when he lived in this State. He was a Conservative Democrat and was held in high esteem by all who knew him or had occasion to come in contact with this brilliant son of the Lone Star State. However, whether his connec­tion with the administration in this exalted post wHllift the Eisen­hower regime to a higher strata of political morality or whether Modern Republicanism will pull him down to its own level, is a matter that is yet to be deter­mined. Texans generally hope that the case of Richard Nixon, in which the Californian also hagan his career as a sound Conservative American but quickly degenerated into an International Socialist on alignment with .Modern Republi­canism, will not be repeated in the case of Mr. Anderson. Texans knew and respected the new Secretary of the Treasury as a sound and conservative cham­pion of Constitutional Govern .. ment. They have yet to learh how he will perform under the sponsor­shop of Modern Republicanism. The new appointee to this high office has the fundamental ability to take his place along with such great Secretaries of the Treasury as Alexander Hamilton, Carter Glass and Andrew Mellon. He will also have an opportunity to perpetuate the pattern of bungl- 1ng ineptitude set by William G. McAdoo, Henry Morgenthau, Jr. and John W. Snyder. His fellow Texans will keep their fingers crossed. Eleanor Is all Bogged Down In 'Sorrow for the South' Last month in her insipid news column Eleanor Roosevelt said she was reading a book by one Carl T. Rowan called "Go South for Sor­row," and added lhat it "has forced me to review what has happened in the South since the Supreme Court decision against segregation in the schools." Her "review" of the South forced her to the conclusion that in that area there was "an appalling record of lawlessness, ol contempt for our Su­preme Court and those who sit on it. Winding up her inane remarks she said, "I do not have to go South for Sorrow. I sorrow here." She does not only not have to "Go South for Sorrow." She does ll()t have to go South. Period. And the less she goes there, the better pleased South­erners will be. With her obnoxious views on racial mixing, she is about as welcome in that area as a skunk at a lawn party and regardless of what she thinks of the South, the South thinks worse of her. When she bobbed up in Houston last month, the management of the hotel where she stayed was greatly embarrassed by the presence of pick­ets thrown all around the building carrying banners with uncomplimen­tary references to this particular guest. Once Again the Southern Conservative Ciave Facts We certainly don't claim to always be right but we certainly did call the shots in the case of the bill passed at the last session of Congress which would undo the Supreme Court's imposition of Federal control Qver the price of natural gas at the wells. The measure passed both the House and Senate but was vetoed by the President who claimed that he favor­ed the bill but was compelled to veto it for a "moral reason." This "moral reason" was because one of the mem­bers of the Senate claimed he had been offered a bribe by an oil com­pany to vote for it. We said editorially at the time of the veto that the President did not, in our opinion, veto the measure be­cause of the alleged bribe incident but because he believed in Federal control. Vfe pointed out that the same man who was reported to have at­tempted to "bribe" one of the sen­ators with $2,500 had contributed double that amount to the National Republican Committee during Eisen­hower's candidacy for the office of President. This session a similar measure was introduced but it has had hard sled­ding, principally because of admin­istration opposition and crippling amendments offered by Modern Re­publicans. An excerpt from an editorial in the Dallas News in this connection is interesting: " ... Strangely, Presi­dent Eisenhower recently made the baffling statement that the only kind of gas bill he would sjau would be one that kept Federal control. Earlier he had gone on record in favor of a decontrol bill. No explanation has been given for his about-face. Last Congress passed a decontrol bill, only to have it vetoed because of lobbyist pressure in its behalf .. ," So, the President didn't veto the earlier bill for "moral reasons" after all but simply because he is for Federal control, just aS the Southern Conservative claimed. We are not happy at being right about this because of the principle involved but the fact remains that we were right and that we saw through the reason given for vetoing the bill. And all those big oil men who are liberal and generous with their money except when it comes to aid­ing in the promotion of American­bm, and who rushed up to Washing­ton and to Augusta to play golf with the President may have had all the trouble and expense for nothing be­caUse the bill in which they are inter­ested probably is not going to be passed or will be vetoed again, if it should be passed. The United States is the only country on earth which would al­low its government to send for­eign aid to countries abroad in order that such countries may low­er their own taxes while those of the contributing nation continue to skyrocket. There's a name for that type of "statesmanship" but it can't be used in publications which go through the mails. Just think! We fought the Revo­lutionary War over the imposi­tion of a tax on tea by the English. And, Holy Mackeral, think what is happening to us now and most of us not only are not fighting for our rights and freedom but we don't even know what is going on. May God forgive us! We Are Already Living Under Socialism, Mr. Kruschchev Another Communist Is Snatched From Stir by The Supreme Court The Supreme Court finally made a ruling so baldly favoring Com­munists and other criminals that the Congress of the United States may be stirred to action and pass remedial legislation to correct the situation. The ruling was written by one of the President's new appointees to the Court, William J. Brennan, and dealt with the case of a New Mexico Communist union leader, who had been sentenced to five years in prison on charges of filing a false non-Communist affidavit in 1950 with the National Labor Re­lations Board. Previously this character who was president of a Communist-dominated union, had been thrown out of the CIO. In ordering a new trial for this Communist union leader, the Su­preme Court held that the govern­ment must either turn over secret FBI reports to criminals who are on trial or abandon prosecution in such cases. This had not been done in the case on which the Court was passing. The ruling even turned the stomach of Tom Clark, one of the Justices of the Court who has heretofore not only seemed shock­proof against action by the tri­bunal but who has taken part in many decisions which have nause­ated the better element of the na­bonfs citizeiiSJlip. Clark said that if the r uling was allowed to stand "those intelli­gence agencies of our government engaged in law enforcement may as well close up shop." While this may be a case of the pot calling the kettle black, there was indica­tion in Washington that Congress has taken notice at last of the in­creasing decisions of the court which outrage public opinion and cause responsible Americans to tremble at the prospect of each new C:ecision to be handed down by that body. Senator Karl Mundt of North Dakota and Congressman Kenneth B. Keating of New York agreed with Clark that the matter posed a serious problem and indicated that legislation would be offered to off-set the action by the Court. The ruling is, indirectly, another tribute to the far-sighted wisdom of the late Senator Joseph R. Mc­Carthy of Wisconsin who tried to tell his colleagues about Brennan's ideological views, when the latter was up before the Senate for con­firmation. He got exactly nowhere and his lone vote was the only one registered against the "liberal" from Red Bank, New Jersey, when final action was taken. Walter Leckrone, writing in the Indianapolis Times, says all the furor over Civil Rights of Negroes which is sweeping the country is a umental epidemic" for which the antidote is comntan sense. "The fact that a proposal such as this (Civil Rights) even would be de­bated in Congress or have the sup­port of people who really believe in Civil Rights, 'shows how far the contagion has spread," Mr. Leckrone says and adds that one civil right cannot be made strong­er by wiping out another. Nikita Kruschchev, Russian dic­tator, whose remarks were broad­cast to American listeners on June 2 for some reason known only to the heads of the communications system which broadcast them, said that the people of this country would live under Socialism "in the future". What does he mean "in the fu.. ture" and what does he think they are living under now? What does he think our Social Security system is, if not Social. ism? What does he think American farm subsidies are and the gener­al farm program in which the gov­ernment tells a man what he can and cannot plant and which fines him or puts him in jail if he dis­obeys, is if it is not Socialism? What does he think our govern ... ment's participation in business in competition with private industry such as the Tennessee Valley Au­thority and hundreds of simi1ar projects, is if it is not Socialism? What does he think that unem­ployment compensation, in which people are paid for not working, is if it is not Socialism? What does he think it is· when the nation's judiciary system steps over into the legislative field and passes legislation involving the public school systems of the vari­ous States in accordance with the Win of a Marxist over in Sweden, if not Socialism? Kruschchev knows all this and much more and when he predicted that Socialism for Americans was in the far-off future, instead of pinning it down to the present, he was merely laughing in his beard at the stupidity of a people for ac­cepting without much protest his own vile system which has practi­cally become ours. What we, and many others, would like to know, is who thought up the idea of bringing the old horse thief into the homes of de­cent Americans to air his filthy vi~ws and why they did it. Tennessee's bull-in-a-china-shop, Estes Kefauver, breaks into head­lines with a demand that private power companies be required to pay taxes ('n advertising in which they ••attack public power." Being a full-fledged Socialist, he is of­fended at the factual statements being put out . by private power companies concerning the gigantic cost to American taxpayers be­cause of the operation of the So-'"' cialist project called the Tennes­see Valley Authority. People in all other sections of the United States suffer a heavy tax-gouge in order that those in the Tennessee Valley Authority area may enjoy low - rates on their utilities. And regard­less of anything the horse-faced Senator from Tennessee may say, the TV A is a disgrace to the na­tion. Page 8 Once This Could Have Happened Only In USSR Reflecting the sentiment now rampant in Washington for the nullification or abolishment of the Am- can Constitution, mental healt11 propagandists, as a group, are perhaps making greater pro­gress along this line than any other organized body of international­Ists. In this connection, the Honor­able Usher Burdick of North Da­kota had placed in the Congres­sional Record on June 4 a com- C~~J~:~;~~ J~r~~al t~~sc!!~i~e;to~ "mental health" bill introduced in the California legislature which would, if passed, annul completely the Fourth Amendment to the Constitution. It is Senate Bill No. 1299 and provides: "Any peace officer may, at any tim~ of the day or night, in the execution of any of the pro­visions of this article, enter any dwelling or other building if the h:;i~~!s~n!t~~e~~u~~ t~ ~~fie~;i~~~ patient to be therein or if the officer is not admitted after his authority and purpose have been made known, he may, at any time of the day or night, break open any outer or inner door or window of such dwelling o• other building or any part thereof in order to make entry for the execution of the provisions of this article." Here is what the Fourth amend~ ment to the Constitution of the United States says on that sub~ ject: "The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers and effects, against unreas~ onable searches and seizures, shall not be violated and no warrants shall issue but upon prob~ble cause, supported by oath or affir­mation, and particularly describ­ing the place to be searched and the persons or things to be seized." All thoroughly informed people know that the organized interna~ tiona! mental health propagandists are as great a threat to this coun~ try as Communism for they are part and parcel of the Internation­al Communist conspiracy. How­ever, many will find it hard to believe that in one State of the Union they actually propose legis­lation which will allow them to break down the doors of a citizen's home In the dead of night and carry off, without indictment or trial by jury, any citizen who holds opposing political views. They've had a long sweet sleep, but tho American people had bet­ter wake up and find out what has ~~=~ ~~t;:n~~~ }~.:~~: ~':,~i~~ their Rip Van Winkle nap. Maybe You'd CaH This A 'Liberal' Education An Austin housewife has an elderly colored woman, Samantha, who has been coming to her home and doing her laundry for years. Recently this colored woman • brought her little grand-daughter along to look after as she did the weekly wash. During the day her employer heard her say to the child: "Now you quit that Diploma, or I'se goin' to spank you good.'' Out of curiosity she asked Sam~ antha why she called the little girl "Diploma" and Samantha re~ plied: 411 sent my daughter to college and that's what she got." THE SOUTHERN CONSERVATIV& June, 1957 McCarthy's Fight Against Comnamists Was Bitterly Opposed From the First We Are A Reactionary and Are Extremely Proud· of It I! any one really wants to pay tribute to us, let them call U! a Reactionary. That the late Senator Joseph R. McCarthy of Wisconsin confidently expected full cooperation o! his col­leagues in the fight on Communism when he first came to Washington is attested by his published state­ments on the subject. That his confidence was shattered on his first bout with a senatorial committee is equally clear. His elec­tion to the United States Senate came at the close ot his service in Navy Intelligence in the South Pacific where he collected information and data he felt would be invaluable to those concerned in the internal secur­ity of his country. "Upon my return to the United States I discovered that our long~ time foreign policy was being scut­tled-- scuttled without the approval of either of America's two great polit­ical parties," he wrote. "At that time I trankly had no idea that traitor~ were responsible. · "In my campaign tor the United States Senate, I referred to the State Department planners as 'starry-eyed dreamers' drifting from crisis to crisis like a group of blind men through a labyrinth o! their own creation. I then thought that we were losing to International Communism because of abysmal incompetence. At that time I had not even heard the names of those whom I was later to expose and force out of policy·making joba. "Many of them I heard discussed for the first Ume by a man who was later to be hounded to his death by the Communists. I arrived in Wash· lngton in December, 1946, about two weeks before being sworn in as Sen~ a tor. "Three days later my administrative assistant and I received an invitation to have lunch with Jim Forrestal. "I have often wondered how the extremely busy Secretary of the Navy discovered that a freshman Senator had arrived in town and why he took so much time out to discuss the problems which were so deeply dis­turbine him. More than an equal number of times I have thanked God that he did. "Betore meeting Jim Forrestal I had thought we were losing to Inter~ national Communism because of stu~ pidity on the part ot our planners. I mentioned that to Forrestal. I shall forever remember his answer. He said: 'McCarthy, consistency has never been a m:.1rk of stupidity. If they were merely stupid, they would oc~ caslonally make a mistake in our favor'." McCarthy's encounter with the fir&t o! the many obstacles which were lat~ er to be incessantly thrown in his way as his evidence drew blood from Communist conspirator!, was before a special committee o! the Senate in 19~0 to hear carefully documented evidence presented in detail but a truthful report of which was never to see the light of day. Millard Tydings ot Maryland, a notably undistinguished member ot the Senate, was chairman of the com­mittee and his preliminary appraisal of the hearing& was expressed in these words: "~t me have · McCarthy :lor three days ln public hearings and he w111 never show his :lace In the Sen­ate again." "As I walked down the long marble corridors to the Senate CaucUs room, I wondered it I would be able to accomplish what I had set out to do," Senator McCarthy wrote later. "I glanced down the press table to my right. Elmer Davis, easy to identify by his heavy black-rimmed glasses, was seated at the end of the table. I remembered that Davis had headed the Of.fice of War Informa· tion. Many ot the cases I was about to present had once been employees in the OWl under Davis and then had moved into the State Department. According to Webster's defini­tion of the word, it means "one who favors a return to an older order" in politics and that's us right down the line. • We would for instance like for this country to return to the honorable status it occupied be­fore Constitutional Government was supplanted by New Dealism, Fair Dealism and Modern Repub· would cover the story. licanism, or a combination of all "At one of the other press tables, !7~~e under which we now oper• I noticed one o! Drew Pearson's men. "As I glanced at Davis, I recalled that Stanislaw Mikolajcyk, one of the anti·Communist leaders of Poland, had warned the State Department while Davis was head of OWI, that OWI broadcasts were 'following the Communist line consistently' and had said that the broadcasts 'might well have emanated from Moscow itself'. There could be no doubt how Davis I could not help but remember that We would like to return to tha Pearson had employed a member of time when pride in our free en~ the Communist Party, Andrew Older, terprise system, or the capitalistic to write Pearson's stories on the system if you will, so filled the House Committee on Un-American hearts and minds of the American Activities and that another ona of citizen that he had neither the Pearson's limited stalf was David time nor desire to experiment with Karr, who had previously worked :lor · decadent European ideologies nor the Communist Party's official publi~ to engage in subversive activities calion, the Daily Worker. No doubt for the overthrow of his own about how Pearson would cover the matchless governing machinery. story. at~·: ::~a~~~q~~ ;~n!:/t~~o s:~~ da;:~:~1:r!~:a~~s r~}u~~r t~n!~~ committee room to chat with him. tutions of learning were educated As I saw Childs with his hand on in the basic principles of Amerl~ McMahon's shoulder, I reme~bered canism, fired with patriotism for :~:!o~h~~d; ~~! ~:~n::: ~~!~rl~e:X i~:~~r~:"wff~g a~~tl~~u~~y m:~: tacked 'General MacArthur's head- ~~!r s~~~l ~~~~rir;d raet~e~ \t~i~ ~::~:::~~:~~Y ~fo'£~ tr"~~u~l ~~~~~~n~u~~r;h~h;!d~~a~~~o:~~- chtnese Communist leaders. We would like to go back to the "The wire services were there- day when the Executive, the Ju- Associated Press, United Press and dicial and the branches International News Service. In their of government presence, I felt some sense ot security. unUs serving as ch .. oks- 'Bnu-bal'--" Traditionally, their lob was to pre· ances against tha usurpation of sent the .facts without any editorial~ power by any of the three; when ~::!,0~o~set~;!~0~h~t ;h 1 e v:::~:t~e!~ r~~~~a~;s theer;r:~:~e~~ i~i~a:~; stacked even there. The wire service advice and consent of the United men assigned to the Hill are almost States Senate: when our foreign to a man honest, lair and capable re~ poltcy was developed In accord­porters. But after several experiences, ance with the safety and security there was impressed upon m& the of the American Republic instead ~;in~! t~~~P~~:!t:h~0s~~:!esA';~it~ d~nbe~~~ ~~~~~ l~n~e~=~iet~~ or INS men assigned to cover the Washington for adoption. Senate or the Howe might not even be recognized by them when these We would like to go back to stories went on the ticker to the the days when duly constituted thousands of newspapers throughout authorities of the American gov· the countJ.·y. Before being sent out to ernment who left American pri­Amerlca's newspapers the stories pass sonen of war to rot in enemy jails across what is known 8_. a re-write and who withheld the protection of desk ... " the American Constitution from The testimony and documented ev14 members of our armed forces and dence presented to the committee by surrendered them foi- trial by alien !~e r:s~~~~~~o~e~~l~1ne1~f t~~e ri~~~;t~~ ~~u~~fo';~us~n~~~~.been impeach 4 gated persons from the State Depart- We would like to go back to the ment but the report of the proceedings days when the Governors and the was, when finally issued, so distorted, members of the Legislatures of the whitewashed and rendered so innocu~ Sovereign States had an under­ous as to be practically unrecognix- standing- of their Constitutional able. Rights and the political courage An astounding incident connected and the personal manhood to de· with that first hearing set it out as fend them, and when any attempt perhaps unprecedented in American by the Supreme Court or any other history ot auch events. Tydings allow~ Washington agency to cross State ed counsel for the Democratic memb- lines and take over local institu4 ers of the Committee to be present tions would have stirred an en­but excluded those of Republican raged people to Immediate and members but that was mild compared drastic action. to his behavior in connection with one of the characters involved. Yes, we are a Reactionary and While the committee was taking f~b!d~~ll~d a o~=~inite compliment "secret" testimony concerning Owen Lattimore in a session from which even McCarthy was barred, a man sitting at the hearing table taking notes of all that the witness, Louis Bdenz, was saying about him was­Owen Lattimore, himself. From that time on, McCarthy's at­tempts to clean Communists out of strategic government positions were confronted with every restriction that could be thrown up against him and when, finally, his disclosures were on the point of flushing out the blg boys at the top-way up at the top-the Committee for an Effective Congress' Paul Hoffman went Into action to get him "censured'' and the result is history. (For Tydings Committee rna~ terial, See McCarthyism, the Fight for America).
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