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The Southern Conservative, Vol. 2, No. 7-8, July-August 1951 - File 001. 1951-07/1951-08. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 21, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/southern/item/1107/show/1098.

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(1951-07/1951-08). The Southern Conservative, Vol. 2, No. 7-8, July-August 1951 - File 001. The Southern Conservative. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/southern/item/1107/show/1098

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Southern Conservative, Vol. 2, No. 7-8, July-August 1951 - File 001, 1951-07/1951-08, The Southern Conservative, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 21, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/southern/item/1107/show/1098.

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Title The Southern Conservative, Vol. 2, No. 7-8, July-August 1951
Contributor
  • Darden, Ida M.
Publisher Southern Conservative
Date July 1951-August 1951
Language English
Subject
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
Place
  • Fort Worth, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 10604411
Collection
  • Houston Metropolitan Research Center
  • Ida M. Darden Collection
  • The Southern Conservative
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Houston Metropolitan Research Center.
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript HE OUTHERN 0 Sec. 34.66 P.L.&R. U. S. POST AG& P A I 0 Permit No. 1665 Fort Worth, l'exas VATIV- -To plead for a return of Constitutional Governtnent- Vol. 2 Fort Worth, Texas, July-August, 1951 No. 7-8 ELECTION OF 1952 IS THE DEADLI E FOR DECISION ON FUTURE OF THE REPUBLIC Barkers For Work Both Fair Deal Sideshow Sides of the Street The voioes of Fair Deal squanderers don't fade away-they just get loud­er and funnier. Even with the "cease fire" plans getting under way and prospects for the easing up of Mr. Truman's private war in Korea getting b"righter, a couple of Fair Deal shills who are not exact­ly Truman stalwarts, but smalltime barkers at administration sideshows, hit the headlines ballyhooing for high­er taxes and more spending. Frightened out of their wits at the r.rospect of the possible ending of an 'emergency" t h e s e t w o pitchmen warned in ominous tones that an­other was just around the corner­they hope. Eric Johnston, Economic Stabilizer, dashed over to the Senate to advise the Finance Committee of that body that a $10,000,000,000 increase in taxes should ~ voted. He s a i d ihat even if the· war ends in Korea, there is still the battle of inflation and warned that the government intends to go right ahead, war or no war, with its program of spending $1,000,000,- 000 per week for mobilization. This, the great stabilizing statesman point­ed out is the way to fight Commun- We Need A Marshall Plan For The United States The United States government has officially announced that it M.s dis­continued its "culturist activities" in Hungary and that it has so informed that Communist nation. While we, along with most other Americans, have no idea what its "culturist activities" consisted of, or why they were trying to instill culture into· Communists in the first place, we are glad the practice is discon­tinued. What we need is a Marshall plan for this country and we should take the money that the diplomatic dim­wits in the State Department have been frittering away on trying to impart culture to Communists and use it trying to promote American­is. rn in the United States. ----0---- For Every Convicted Communi!~ . There's A Friendly Federal Judge Government officials handling the cases against Communists who are trying t<> overthrow our form of government not only have the Commies and their attorneys to outwit, but have to fight many Federal judges as well. For every conS<!ientious government proseculor who puts a Communist in jail, there is always a Federal judge t() set him free. One of this species named Judge Learned ism. Working the other side of the street at the same time, Averell Harriman up in Philadelphia warned an audience of 1,000 that even though the Korean war should end, "the United States cannot afford to relax a single day in its e f f o r t s to strengthen the free world". Harriman who holds the fancy title of "Special Advisor to the President on Foreign Affairs" is the poverty­conscious millionaire who sheds copi­ous tears over the underprivileged and backward people of the world and whose idea for ending all their woes is to make each of them a ward of Uncle Sam. Through some miscalculation of the stork this international do-gooder was dropped in the home of a rich man and some of his critics are unkind enough to suggest that he landed on his head. , With the breaking point almost reached in the dissipation of our re­sources and the squandering of the American taxpayers' money, no one but a maniac would advocate that the orgy of reckless and irresponsible spending be continued and increased. HERE IS ONE FOR THE BOOKS One of the most powerful members of the "United" Nations is Russia whose dele­gates never cooperate w.ith other members, who are constantly vetoing something or other and who seem to be always waiting for a chance to throw an egg in the electric fan just to see what will happen. Also, it is Russia the "United" Nations member who is secretly conducting the war in Korea against the "United" Nations as a whole. So they call a conference in Korea to dis­cuss a cease-fire proposal. The conference is attended by representatives of the Chin­ese Communists and those of the "United" Nations. - So what, in plain English, does that mean? It means that Russia, as a member of the "United" Nations is negotiating with Rus­sia who is the power behind the Chinese Communists. In other w<>rds, in the current negotia· tions in K<>rea, Joe Stalin is talking to him­self. He can't lose. Hand of New York is the latest to side with the enemies of his country and to upset a former decision which raised the bail of seventeen Communists and forbade the no­torious Civil Rights Congress to supply it. Too bad that a few of these fellow-trav­eling Federal judges can't be thrown in the jug along with the Commies. Another Victory for the Pendergast Underworld Political Machine Means the End of Constitutional Government in This Country and the Official Acceptance of Socialism . Those ~ho hope to break up the Truman underworld political machine m the elE-ction of 1952, had better begin to take stock of its firmly en­trenched p_ower and try to intelligently evaluate the heavy odds they must ?verc?me If they are to uproot the most corrupt and degenerate admin­IstratiOn ever to have and to hold a government within its grasp. First, there is the national Tammany Hall set up by Roosevelt and his hatchet men to keep the New Deal brand of plundering politician in the Chief Executive's office forever. This machine has been broadened and strengthened by Truman who has adopted a bolder and more daring policy in padding the public payroll ~han Rofl<;evelt ever dreamed of until today these forces number, accord­mg to the best estimates, 2,324,000 civilian government employes. This means that approximately one person out of every eight in the United States is on the Federal payroll. Assuming that thesE' 2,324.000 employes average five persons in their f~mily Of immediate C Jtle of influence, we have 11,620,000 political para­Sites depende1,1t on the continuation of the Fair Deal for their support. In addition, there are millions drawing old age pensions, unemploy­ment insurance, assistance to the needy, welfare checks, or some other form of governmental hand-outs which have been put in operation through the adoption by a spineless Congress of the Socialistic programs of Roose-velt and Truman. · Also, there ar1~ other millions of labor union racketeers, Negroes and other rrinority groups in whose interest the agenctes of government, in­cluding the Supreme Court of the United States, J;tave largely functioned in recent years. AddPd together, this aggregation of economic beggars constitutes a hungry horde of servile sycophants who know nothing, and care less, about fundamental principles of government and whose last concern on earth is the welfare of the Republic or the continuance of the American way of life. Tht~y are interested in one thing and one thing only and that is in seeing that their special privilege of sucking the public teat is not with­drawn. · To in~;ure this, they will flock to the polls in 1952, as they did in 1948, and they will vote for any candidate the Fair Deal gang may nom­inate and it will not make the slightest difference to them whether that candidatP is Harry S. Truman, Dwight D. Eisenhower or Francis the Talk­ing MulE>. It i'> the system of government by hand-outs and special favors which they arf' determined to preserve and keep intact. On the credit side, as opposed to this depraved segment of the citizen­ship, are the millions of Americans who calmly sat with their teeth in their mouth and allpwed this noxious condition to build up but who are now thor-oughly awake to the fact that their house is burning down and that onl)' they can put out the fire. Thi.s newly-alerted group is indifferent, for the most part, to party politics, being drawn from the ranks of both parties and no party at all, since it includes thousands whose partisan convictions are not yet formed. Jn t.Pe main it is composed of those who have been guilty of indif­ference bnt who, in the final analysis, love their own country first and whose conception of loyalty and patriotism presupposes their duty to help preserve its institutions and way of life. They are appalled by the realization that Communism has been ap­peased and Communists coddled by the Roosevelt and Truman admin­istrations to the extent that it now requires 165 pages for a Committee of Congress to report on and list the subversive individuals and organiza­tions working within this country for the overthrow of our form of govern· ment. They are outraged by the belated recognition of the fact that no sizeable group of Americans can be gathered together in furtherance of any political, religious, educational or allied program in this country, that onr> or more stooges of Stalin do not sit in on the meeting and assist in directing its poliCies. But they are thoroughly awake at long last and all over the nation during the past year there has been a swelling chorus of indignant voices reverberating in the universal query: "What can we do to stop it?" If this powerful fvrce w~ich is now imbued with a resurgence of Americanism can be correlated and assembled in support of a candidate for president who is of sufficient stature and patriotism that he can forget (Continued on Page 2)' vs It ,.,. 2 THE SOUTHERN CONSERVATIVI July-August, 1951 Action By Only Seven Stales Record Of Lecturers Just a Suggestion wn~:;;~~;~~~~it ~eh~~:;~Jk~~~~~e~~ Needed To Repeal Income Should Be Checked pa~no~~;r e:~~so~i~~h~bo7~~~~:ss th:ho~~~ ~~;~~h;ahne~r a:~:m~~:!r~~P~fe;:~a~ Jax Amendment Americans who h<we the respon- construetion finance Corp.- . he is a Republican on dom~stic po~icy sibility of granting' permiSSion to lee- 1t would th:o.w Stuart Symtngto~, pres· and. a pemocrat. ~n f?reign pol~cy. With recent action by the Utah legisla- turers from Washington , New York ent RF? admt.nLstrator, out o£ a _Job and Whtch, m_ our _opmwn, IS the fa~c1est ture in memorializing Congreslll w submit and other points outside their own make htm R\'all:tble for a new ass1gnment. feat of shad?lm~ SO far accomphshed a re•olution to the Statu repealing the ~~~\~chtopu~~?ts b~1~l<~li~f~~r a~~~W~i~Ta~: re:U~ ;~~~~0:0 0 ; 0 d:Opn;;tr:!:;r s~:~~~g b~ m the world s hlst~ 8hdetnth or Jncom• Tax amendment to forms for delivering addresses had n_ee~ of wake-up and clean-up treatment The American Bar Association hat t he Constitution, It becomes necessary for better look more closely into the Similar to t~at used to such good effect go~e on record as _opposing t he ap· tmly seven more Statea to take similar backgrounds o£ such speakers than on. the RFC m the last f~w we~ks. po~ntment by President Trum~n _or slep1 to make it mandatory fur Congress they have in the past. rhere would _be w1de d1fference of Fneda Hennock as a Federal D1stnct to submit the matter. About five times out of ten, such ;~~.:i,~n~n:~t ':e:~~~h t~1~an~:m~~g:::n~!u~~ !:~~~ic~~ ~~~t~:s~c~~i~n ~~r~rt;rn~ ·r.,..qty.four States had previously acted speake~s and t_h~ g:oups t~ey repre· worst. ly capable of passing on the qualifica .. favo 1-.bly on the subject. ~enl aJ~ subveJ SIV~ and their. purpose But, just for a starter, our nomination lions of lawyers in this country. So Thf resolution& as passed have_ provid~d ;!i:~ _&1~0 ~~~~ed~t~~:sa a~fd ~~~~~p~~:£. goes to the Burea~~~~n~:~~a~:r~~e~~:ss. ~~?ed;·esident will probably appoint lor a tubt"htute amendment which lim1ts mg 1t mto a world government orj----------.:.:.:_:.:::._ ____ ___ _ :x~ ~:·~::~ m:: ~:~ ::e i:c::~~t gi~~ ~?;~~~ 0~~j;ct~~i~d, isSo~!~liJ~i~tr~~he~: ELECTION-Continued From Page 1 ,.nd lakeritance taxes, in peacetime. Amencan form or goveJ nment. party lin~-s and politics and base his campaign solely on principles, th~re The movement which now seems as SOJ~~e s~~eo(is st!~~~vi~~~ ~~~ul~h~~ is hope fl)r victory. . . tmf'd of succesa wa8 initiated by the e-xercised by the owners or officials Any one _who doubts t~1s must remember that 1t h as b~en almost WP&tern Tax Council of Chicago in 1939 of structures where such gatherings two decades smce the Amencan people have had an opportumty to vote rmd nas been assisted by other organiza- are held unless they wish to aid and for a candidate for President of the United States, put out by either party, t.,i()ns aroups and individuals abet the forces who are seeking to who stood lor anything at all. Th~ Committee for co_nsti~utional GO\'· ihu: ~~e~~~~n t~a~e~f f/;!~rprise and 'I'o correctly gauge. the re~ctio~ of the American people when they. =~~i::_n\nhasE!>;!:~nac~~vg~s::tuhre::in:n~o. ~~! un1{!~ ~~:[ls ~~~u?~ ~~~e s~zec~~~~~ ~~i~~ t~~JP s';l~·e~~;p;:~u~~~ra~~ ~~~e;~~glt~o o~e g~:~t ~~~:e:o ~:~e~~e~o~he~ C'hrl st1~n Amencan organ1zatton has a1ded tee or citizens whose responsibility is enthusJ~StJc millions who recently paid glowing tribute to General Douglas ~:J(i~~:~~!a.the measure through Southern to keep i_nformed of _all outside speak- MacArthur. Mr. F. E. Packard ex..eutive vice presi- ~?th~oym~i~l ~~t a~g1 =~~hloaca~ar~~ouu!r~ In thPir prese~t aroused state of mind, there are indications that lent el the Western Tax Council expresses and have the record of these speakers these ater . e~ ~me nca~'\ would wel~ome the_ chance to vote for a cour· ron_f,:-fence th~t th~ end of the long fight looked into, it will be surprising how ageous, p",tnot1c A_mertcan once agam as a tlred and thtrsty traveller on • ~ .,, sight w1 th v1etory assured. many of them are subversive or rep- the parr h t-d and bhstermg sands of the desert, would welcome a downpour Discussing the movement from its begin- resent orga nizations which have been of rain. 'i11( Mr. Pac kard sald: cited as Communist fronts. Up until l933, this was a two-party Republic. Jn:~nc:it~N=~.~::a:e::te~~ ~~~ca~:.un~~~~ an~t ~~ ~eat;~ ~~n b~e:~{~ £~~:;:; :~[~~ Thit plan of rotating politi~al power in the presidency w_as a whole. ~;n,.a~~:~n~o ~:.!: :;:~~~~~~~:scatt~r:;guh;:~ ~~~~~u,~~~ c~~~ ~~=ri~~c;i1~~~~d'~c~I~ ~~~e(\:~1,rl ~~;~f;,~~~~. ~~!t~:.o.;~Yh s~~r;~d ~~sf bsea~~~~;~d ~f~~:tR~~~~f~ ('onllre~ to hmlt £ederal income taxes to lure and education" in the form of lS to survn.e . ~~per cent of an individual's lncon~e, and prepared speeches and literature de- . H_o:veve_r , when_ the governi!lg forces ?f a nat~ on touch rock bottom at the Home t~me reduce all ~th_er mcome signed to further some "cause." m poh!H'"i\1 1_mmorah ty as t~ ose m control m Washmgton have now d one , tu .e. proportionately. The hmttatlon, of patriotic cihzens are not likely to be as much concerned in repairing coune, w()uld apply only in peacetime. -o---- party fE>nCPs and restormg party prestige as they are in pitching in and tl;o e~~;~\~i;,~op~:s thsi;:~:~qu~k:ax~~~~;~ Confusion About Tidelands savin~n~:.:y~pi~~~:icft;~i\t: at:; s~~~tidwtoa~~~~e ~~~~·the State of the Union lRbor, since state lel{i!';\ati.tres have no con· Ownership Causes Loss of can he returned to a staole basis by simply \'Oting for an opposition candi· :7tlu:O:r ~;::i~·~st~~::· ifH~~~o~~~~;d~h:fc:hn~ Mill ions of Dolla rs ~~~~t~e1 ely because he happens to be nominated on the Republican ttalea tO petition Congress, it must submit Aside from the political immorality in· To proceed on that premise ts to ignore the tragic fact that the taint • contt:itutional anwn.d~ent to the people. volved when a government sets itself up of Radicrtlism has permeated the Republican party in only a relatively Thus, If 32 states oHJclally en~orse a Con- as a common thief as in the case of the smaller rle~ree than it has dominated Democratic party ranks. ttltuHonal amendment limi~mg federal Tidelands, the eeonomic waste resultinl{ Abl)Jishing the United States in favor of a world government is no tax.e.11 to 25 per _cent of net mcome, Con- from the confusion while ownership is less an act of treason when sponsored by a Republican Party platform; tre_s~ m~l!';t submit such an amendment for pending, Is appalling. Federal aid to education and socialized medicine lose none of their repul· :~~!:;~~~~jy 1:a:i~~e~~ua::::~d~et:t ~~a~:~ Authorilies in Louisiana report that siveness bPcause ~epublicans urge their. adopti~n; FEPC legislation be· eomes ~art of the Constitution. ' :~r:~~:::: a:~ n~:atoi~t:~~lo~:~io~0~~n~0th: ~~~~~i:;~f-~es~y a~ ~~~hl~~a~n~a~gi:a~e~r~can policy of government when 1• t~ls 1 I_ong a~d cu"!ber~me pro- standstill since the Fair Deal messenger Pat not ic Ar:'ericans are as bitterly opposed to a Socialistic Federal F"~ .. ~~~.,~~~y·c~l.~~~l \ :~; ";~~v~~·,a.; ~~~~.;:· c~~~:1~1r"'t~. ~ ~~\~.~·~l:l:~· h:~: ~~~;!~.m~~;\l!~.mb~ina:;~b~r. R;fir~~~~~~. N~~~r~~a:~~~. li~~d~:.r~rke~~a~~~: c!lll~;t:n ef~~e:a~r;:a!e~im: i n~o~:~· t:::s ruled that Tidelands property belongs to garet C!lasE': Smith and other Radicals as they are when it is directed by ~:ul~h= ~::~~a~~: 91t~g: ':~~e bs;a~:~ ~~~; th~::d:r;~6~~==~~vestmE>nt involved, the ~~~=~~~~a~i ~;~~titutional government is to _be restore? it wi_ll be the C(lnstitutlonal amendment. The West· operators are afraid to drill until the t hrough I he combmed efforts of the best element m both maJOr parhes. •rn Ta.x Council believes that once the question of ownership is fina lly settled We have now comt- to the place where a citizen is no longer a Repub· amendment ic actually proposed, it will In the meantime even the boundary line lican or a Democrat but is either for this country and its institutions or be qui(kly ratified. ~etwee n State and Federal ownership he is against them and 1t is only on this basis that the Federal government 'Mu~ i6 tlatea which have endorsed the 1s in doubt cause~ by the vague manner can be retlieved from the political vandals who now dominate it. ,ropoNI are: Wyominc. WiscoruiR, In· in whi(h the "decision" was adopted. A hopeful rainbow in the political skies is that r esponsible leaders diana, Rhode Island, Mississippi, Iowa, Like all government agencies in reeent 'of both major parties now realize t his and there are strong indications Maine. Michla:an. MaMacfmsetts, Arkansas, years. the Court proceeds on the theory that a Ct.}::t!ition movement, based on the one in Congress whi ch has oper· :O.laware. PenRsylvania, Texas, 11Jinois. that brief, concise and forthright words ated duriflg recent years to stave off complete Communism, may be formed. AlabaMa. Kentucky. New Jersey, New are to be avoided like the plague, and The plan of Senator Karl Mundt of South Dakota who has been striv­Ham, shire, Nebraska. Louisiana. Mon- that ambiguous, meaningless and endless in·g for party realignm~nt in the interest of a working alliance between tana, Nevada, Kansas, Florida and Utah. term.11 are the proper verbia_ge in which Conservath·e Republicans and Southern Democrats in t he 1952 election, to clothe any governmental d1rective. has met With a heartening response in all sections where he has presented it. In defense .or his firing General Mac- In Its infamous ruling, the Court said AlsoJ there is encouragement in the substantial movement spearheaded Arthur, Pres1dent Truman pleads a the government owned the minerals under by Senat<'r Harry F. Byrd and Governor James F. Byrnes which giveS a constitutional provi~ion making him the coastal submerged lands "seaward of faint glimmer or hope that the Democratic party may be dethroned as a Commander In Ch1e~ of oor Armed the ordinary low-water mark and outside party of privilege and re~tored as a party of . principles, but the chance Forces. Our first President was a Com- inland water." IS slim. Despots don't easily surrender power. ""}an~f~ In C~!f1f In_ fac: a?d by tyirtu~ Asked by representatives or oil com- In :tddition, there i£ a fifty-fifty chance that Republican Party leaders ~h mJ \ ary ~ 1 p pr~~r i ;>~~a J0r\ 0d panics holding least's in the Tidelands to may comf' to their senses and nominate a real American at Chicago instead ~~:t~::~~:~a~f~~;~:Jth:n~:~~~~~!~z~~ ~;~~~!7 !~stth~h~~v~~~s~~le:tor~s ;~~:n,ar:: of an;~~e:v~~i~~~~~s:;~ ~~h:~·o~~~ ;t~t;:~~~:·l~~~~~i~~:n ~~~e~o~~a~~ among Chief until World War II when Presi- rephed In words seldom uttered by a the conc:.t>rvat1ves m etther party, or m a coahtJOn of both, they had better dent Roosevelt did not ov~rlook an op- bureaucrat: ''I don't know." get their ht>ads together now a~d plan to, in some way,_ offer a candidate Ef~::,nl~~ut~ r~~~n~a~':f.:if~tinJh~;.~ be:~gth;.,~·~~ll';':~ ~~~~:~~:~ d~.~~rs r::: ~~n~~~,;;.;;·~~ ;~~:~~~ ~~~e~i~a~~~ ~~~r;~5~h~1r1o~ee ~~:~~,t"~~~~~~Jke~ed rhh~sm~~~~~~~rre;rd;n~i~o~~~~~ll~\~! :x:~~:~!al1:~s:;~i~~:t~~: :.~i~~e h~:rc(~~rk:! and ~hn~~t~o:.~llsl?:re~~e~=~U~~~~~~~n~0~~~~~/~~ ~e~~~f~:=~ ~~~~~~ltUt!Oft apparently faUen upon and wrapped up the highest rpcord for squandering One more election lost to the Pendergast underworld political machine it"elf around our p~gmy President.- R. money and re&ourtH In th@ h1story of the will leave sorrowing. patriotic Americans to walk forever in the Garden C. Patterton, Houston. world or Gethe>Pmane in et ernal mourning over a lost Repu blic. Su On 1 lsti t hi: 1 f ill in j NiE Sm he a tha ~~g I the and the \ he a Me1 ' Aid our pro wer E aga theJ "f thr< 10( Nat I~ cor1 pat iste1 cil o endJ Pro\ T mo chul as ~ '!1 ~~~ u nit1 so:rl ~~d~ Tl gard as t1 the I n ectl T! char u als infil and chur tions Th York dang cour~· been most Fede cesso w. men fore Com1 - any 1 shoul T allot wo _.I_V#:_y-_.o._u.:._gu_sl_, 19_51_ ___- -,--_____T HE SOUTHERN CONSERVATIVI Pogo 1 Successful Propaganda Depends Social Planners Bring On Saying II Over and Over Again On Acts Of Lawlessness Patriotic Americans Government Should Be Refuse to Finance Prohibited by Law Socialistic Sermons From Competing With ':fhe secret of t~e _spread of Soci~l- The serie~ of bombings in Dallas In a certain city in Texas recently one Private Business ~~i~ ~~~~~~~~~:r'~nn~~'crf;~G~~~nda m ~?~~~~~~ ~rh:f,~t h:~~~ ~1;,~"\~~e d:;t~~~ ~!u;:~s~P ·~~":;i:;i;;;,'~i=~i~:,e;'~o s~~d:~ Tucked a~ay in , Senate comml!t .. fil~~~in~al~ee ~~i~;fElfh~: i~s:~1pil~y~"d {~!t~a!~l~s~~~~~ya~d md~~~~·~s~;ti~'~li~~ ::~~~~nge. sermon in be hall o! socialized :~;::!er~·c::o: :ces~~~~:ndby pr::::i':~ in popularizin~ a new tu~e. r~~ul~:s~~ni~~~~~iti~~~l~~:~i~\~c~~~~~~ He pulled out all the stops and went th_e t_wenty-t~ird amendtnenl lo the ~·~n· .As.?" example, ta~e Irene Good con~ern them and try to overturn the to tow~ on the proposition that one of stnutton, wh1ch, Jf adopted .b.y a two-thudll ~~~:~.)~s;h;·;a~e~~d ~~~~e:o\v~r r?i~ cu~~~n;~~gr~;~1lns~~~:;case result- ~:· d~~:":ut"r,::,:,F~~~·:'si~;v::•:·~~,:: ;:~;th:r o~0~~:"~,,::: ~:~·;d b:Y o~:•e; ~;;r~ft~~~· !~a~?~n~v~J~~ •;;~;'~[;~t ~~o;~;t~ ai~e~~o ~~~~~j f~i~~.-a b~~~~~! ;~~n~!~:~,~~~s~:,:~;, P;~~~:~~. P~;·~~~~:.' ~·:e;i:::·\.:n:.:;;;·~n·•:w:~~;sY:::;· br ~~g p~hJi~:g ~~t ";,~~ldh:i\~rt SCI earmng ~~~~~~of:r~~;,"~dp:v~)l~lat~;;~cisp;~ 810;~\~:P~:\~o~~:;,.d:~b!e~~~althy oil man The resoluHon is meant to slop tho But the.y didn't sto~. Thev play~d formance, eve! y Southern Negro among his membership got in tou<'h with ever increasing encroachment of< the fi'ed· them ag-am and agam and a~am, knows that he risks violent reaction several d()('tors, also members. and a con· eral government on private businep and and finally we wound up humming when he attempts to cross the color ference was held_ In a do~· ntown office. reads as follows: them ourselves. line in the South Some of the heav1est contnbutors to that . When most people first started Just as surely· as if thev had held particular church were contacted and an '"The Governme~t of the Umted States hearing propa~anda for Socialized the match which li~hted· the fuse, agreement r.eached. . shall not engag~ m any .busme~, profe• Medicine, World Government, Federal racial agitators in the North and East It was .dec1ded that. th.ey would not ":'1th- Sl~nal,, commer~1~1 or_ 1~dus~~~~l enter~ Aid to Schools, the breaking uo of are responsible for these bombings dra~ thear ~embersh1p m the churc~ s1~ce pnse m oo~~~etJt.lOn w1th 1UI. <:lllze~.s, eK~ our segregation practices and other and jf this sort of thing continues and t~e1r devotion and loyalty to the mslltu - cept as spec~lied m the Const•~ut10n proposals of World Planners, they human life is taken. it is they who t10n Itself could not ~e shaken, but ~hat . Sponsormg the mo~ement •s the Amer· were horrified. will be the real murderers. they would not contnbute another d1me •can Progress Foundat.ion of Los Angelt-s But they heard it over again and Fortunately most Southern Negroes o.r F'ree Ent.er~rise mone: for the propaga- of which Mr. Willis E. Stone ia chair-again and again. It was spewed at do not want to live in white- nei~hbor- ~Jon of S()('~ahsm by a •enegade preacher man. them from the pulpit blared at them hoods and prefer to remain in their 10 the pulp•t. . . ' Much as we would like to see the .•mend- ·• ~~-~~~~stl~~ ~~~~~~ic~it\~;~.and other ow;h~~~ti~rne \~~~~-:~~(' ~~~~l~~~~~ever. ou~ta~~s\:;~f~~ ~!'e~h;;r~c:!:~:1 i:~ld~~~ ~=n~o b::~m:el~ev~ar6o~~r!~:. ~;n;~~::~~~ th 1-Tavi~1g i~ repeatedly. offered .to ~~~~i)!~v~t~~~e;tsf~f \',~~i;i~~:~~11~u~i~~ ~~~;~pt:~er:v~~:i:~e n~~:~. the decreasmg ~:~~~~~\~\~! r:ril:at~~i~~:!n.it to the Stahl all~n~~~!~0t0 s~~lfedv~~~~r~~~~· ~~~~c~~~: orga~izati~ns to remove segregation qo~~rA~:~;~~~s:. congratulations to these The Fair Deal. contingent In that bodt ~hi~~?~~ ~~h~f~i~:~.-c~}{d f~~,;r~~~~ai pr~j~~~i~~n ath;o!~"\~ a horrible and .. .:.,~-;: ;:,k:?, ~~:d •:d w\~"e~p:.:;~ng m~~:' ~~;;,~iot~:t i~eu;~~P~~it;';:" w~~ve~~:::~' f~~!~f:~~~l~;::~~~w1~~1~1Yi!j~~~ ~;~J~~~1f:E~fe(Jr:~f;~~~fs~~~~;~: ~~J.:J.::~i~I;!~}:d:[~~:~~~:r~~~?l~~~]~~ f.~~:?J:f~~,:~:;~E~~~~:::w1~~~:~i~~~ ~~~~t~;.d outright enemies of their Member Of The ~iJf (lan ~-- op:~~.~:sn:~el~~e~~h:en~!~~titution provides It is thus that propaganda ooerates D Jh N Jh h S Truman the Highest Paid another n1ethod by whic~ that instrument :~~!.~e a~~r~~c~~as~r~rsp~~~;~:n%~~! ~~~~S co!mo~~~ Co~~!~ts v~~dee~- President in History ~~~:~ ;;e~~~;i~~!· ~~og;;~;d:o o;u~;i;t:~~~ ever to function in human history_ hilt must have turned many a flip in President Truman is the nation's hi ghest a resoluhon and wh e~ these th1rty-two --0---- his coffin in recent years at the po- paid Chief Executive in hi story and is well states have d.one so, 1t ~~o mes manda- 1000 Miniders Denounce ~~t~i~~ ~a~i~~ex~~n t~~ ~~~~vd~~.~~d~~~~ ~: s~~:r;:~dt0ex!~~:~;gpa~~s t~~t~\.~~ ~~:~e~nfo~o;:t\:;:at~:.u~~'!n'\h~;~ r~:r~~: Narional Council of Churches ~:~~oro~in;r~~~l~i~~ri~~;,~:~~;iit i~i~~~ ~:~:\h~yw~~~in~~~n ~im~i:-H:~::~~t le•·m. ~~~·~h:( ~~a:e~o::;i~u~i:~~led ll, It bi!~ome• _ who is under prison .sent~ nee for con~ It is pointed out that the presidenl who That. is the meth~ employed in pass!!'• In . New York early_ thts month ~c- tempt of court in connection with, his on~e went broke as a Kansas City haber- resolutions ~emanding repeal of the Su:. cordmg to an Associated Press d.ts- alleged assistance in helping- four con- dasher has been paid more than $650,000 teenth or mcome .tax amendment and patch one thousand Protestant mm- victed Communists to escape. in salary and tax-free expense allowances recently the twent!-f1Hh State acted tavor­isters charged that the National Coun- It is difficult for decent, normal since he entered the White House in 194~. a:bly on that, Jeavmg only seven more tCl cil of Churches of Christ in the U.S.A., persons to understand the perverted He is the president, also, who is always adopt it. endangers uthe basic principles of our mentality of a man who h~s prosper- speaking disdainfully of "special in terests·• No good citizen would oppose either or Protestant heritage". _ ed and been the recioirnt of the many and trying to figure up ways to take these two proposed amendments and tha They accused the Counctl or pro- blessings which onlv this coi.tntrv has money away from those who re«-h•e high only opposition to be offered would ba moting uthe idea of t~e . incl~1sive to offer the citizen: and who sDends salaries, and gh•e it to bums and loafers. from those who put political expediency church'' and of "estabhshmg ttself his time and monev in conniving We wonder how much or this million above the national welfare. as a monopoly". with its enemies to destrov it, dollars he has "divvied up" with those who The ministers issued a "Manifesto By his own admission.~ Field is don't Jike to work? ~:hic~~t~~t;;tcf.~~~d~n~.;;:s~~~~~· .\~ ~;~~~~~v i~ctr~;~n~gun~:~h "';~·~m~~~~! - - o-- Californian Wants Only stage on the road toward the ultimate part of his fortune, d•riverl from the Political Climber Reverses Americans On Deck un~he0~=~~o~~yr~~~~~ilis the succes- ff~:·~~~ ~~~~· i~,;~• :,~~':,'~~i;:~s sy~: His Views On Communism J Lestec Millec, a San Jose,Caiifocnh .. sor to the Federal Counc1I of Churches tended to substitute the Soviet plan In the current e<.hlion of the Ladtes Home ~ttorney wh.o spends every a~aL!able hour of Christ which disbanded, or went of government for the American way Journal, Harold Stassen. rebukes Stalin as IJR working m ~c.bal£ of Am~l'lcanism fePll underground, sometime ago. of life. One wonders how he can a vicious dictator and denounces Com- that a new pohtJcal set-up 1s necessary tCl The present Council is generally re· sleep at night. munism in no uncertam terms, but this bring about a return ot Constitutional gov· garded as much the same organization There is only one thing to be said political climber who is always sniffing· ernment. as the Federal Council and many of in his favor. He is truthful about his the wind in search of a popular Issue had "Both Democral8 and Republicans should the Federal Council officials are con- perfidy, and makes no effort to con- an article in the same magazine in August join in the formation o£ a party which i• nected with the new set-up. ceal it. He frankly prefers the Soviet ot 1947 when it was fashionable In soue definitely pro-American," Mr. Miller stales. These two C 0 Unci 1 s have been policies of government to the Ameri- quarters to be a Parlor Pink, in which "In such a party it would be necessary to charged by many groups and individ- can system and says so. he said: eliminate many of the present leaders ot uals with being responsible for the There are scores of others in his "From everything I have read and studied the Republican party and certainly many of infiltration of Socialism. Communism financial bracket who are just as and observed, the condition of the workers those of the Democratic Party. and other alien ideologies into the frankly workin~ to install Commun- in the Soviet Union today is definitely "Millions of Americans are dls£ranchl!4- churches and other religious institu- ism here, but they operate as "Lib- better than lt was under the Czarist brand ed today because neither party stands for tions. erals" in influential political circles of Capitalism. ln other words, Russia under the principles they would like to vote for. Yo~~e i:,ct!1~rt~~ih~h~i~~~~~! iro ~~'~ f~~m Coo~':n~~st;ny one who called :~,: ~~;,~:,~:: ~;:~~i:~c~:~i;al::~;:~~; "It has •!ways been my conception ':"t' ~~~;:~i~~ \~e t~~~~n:l ~~u~~~ i~:;~ de~~eeth~~o~~t~~~:ield is morally a a totalitarian central ~overnment." ;:.~!.: ::;a~o:~: s~t~~~:t ~i~~i:ci~l:; been sounding this warning for al- --o- President Truman's attitude in- and should seek a cand1date who would rar~ most two years, first in regard to the Once in a while people will do opposing the nationalization of Iranian ry them out." Federal Council and, later, its sue- something t h at makes a laughing oil while favoring the grab of the ---<>-- cessor, the National CounciL stock of the human race- like. for Texas Tidelands is somewhat incon- "There was in this country a <"ent .. -a---. instance, the 84 year old woman who sistent, in the opinion of Attorney ury ago, a widely-established system We agree heartily with the state- recently married the 37 year old General Daniel who expressed this of economic security under which ment of the physician testifying be- man. opinion to the recent meeting of the large numbers of our people wera fore the O'Conor Crime Investigation --o-- Texas Bar Association. guaranteed work, food, clothing, shel· Committee recently who said that With ~me hundred and twenty law- --o-- ter, and all the basic necessities of - any one selling narcotics to children yers on Its own staff, the RF.C. spent . ''No ~overnment p1:oper ever had a pro- life from the cradle to the grave should be given the death penalty. $560,300 for o~tside legal advice and vtsio? '? its orgamc law for its o~n But that system was abolished. You ·----o- assi~tance durmg the twelve m~nths termmation"- Ahraham Lmcoln. ~nd s.ttll see we called it slaven·" - Exce-rpt The motto of Russia in dealing with endmg April 30th. Jame~ Dame I. a there are those who advocate d•ssolvmg from Commencement DaY address of all other nations of the \ .. 'Orld; "Heads Scripps-Howard staff writ('r has re- lhe t:nited State'> and absorbing ll into a Benjamin F. Fairless. s"t. Lawrence wa win, tails you lose." vealed. world go\'ernment. lJniversity, Canton, !\ew York Pogo 4 THE SOUTHERN CONSERVATIVI July-August, 19!11'1 Tbe SouthPrn Conservath'e A mont11 ly publicatwn of editonal opinton with natzonat ctrculatwn. A helpleuspcrrowc:on drift with the wind bvtittakesan eagle to fly ogoindthelform. The Tenth Amendment To The Constitution of The Editor::l• 6':fi~~r~~=fi~od~t~uilding United States: 'art Worth, Texu Phone FA·2089 The powers not delegated to the United States by the Cm1stitutwn, nor ___._ ''_'"_$s_.o_oP _"_Y_••_'- --II f;~~~~itt~d t~~ ~~a~~s t::sp~~~~~!ly~r~ "t~ Sent without call to memben of Co11gr.,1 ondothalpublicofficialo tile peopie Open Letter to Certain Publishers of Books, Mago,.ines and Other Periodicals: Stilnding instructions were issued many years ago by leaders in the Russian Politboro to American writers who follow the Communist Party line. These inviolable rules direct that all articles, editorials, books and fiction stories must play up the virtues of the poorer classes, that racial agitation must be carried on in season and out, and especially with reference to the SOuthern Negro and that every conceivable at­tempt must be made, through the written word, to discredit the Amer-ican "Capitalistic" system. · You see, in this country and under our grand American conception of government, it is possible for even the humblest and lowliest citizen to lift himsel£ up to the highest office in the land. The Soviet system, on the other hand, can offer neither hope nor opportunity to those in the ordinary ranks and so they seek to bring about the "leveling off" process and force uniformity by reduOng the highest to the lowest leveL In their attempts for ideological conquest of the world, they have recognized the pen as mightier than the sword and have enlisted the support of writers in every country who are so depraved and lacking in personal integrity and national patriotism that they are willing to become the tools of the Soviet in putting over this Marxian ideal. Maybe you didn't know this and, agam, maybe you did. At any rate, you have been peddling the putrid products and the party line propaganda of these literary rats for many years now. In fact, you have been playing their game for so long that the Politboro has probably listed you as a member of the team in that little black record they keep in the Kremlin. To confirm these assertions, read some of your own stories and books which play up this theme and you will see what we mean. Note how the wealthy man's son is always ashamed of his position and possessions and how, in order to prove his democratic spirit, he always elopes with the ragpicker's daughter. Observe, also, how the beautiful heroine always denounces the suitor who has two changes of underwear as an "Economic Royalist" and demonstrates her preference for the guy on the wrong side of the tracks by falling into the junkman's arms at the end of the last chapter. Count the times your books and publications have pointed up the Southern Negro as a victim of the Southern white man's sadistic cruelty ~tnd have emphasized his limited opportunity for advancement in this country. There seems to be one little thing you have overlooked and we feel it is not out of place to point it out to you here. · The prosperity you enjoy, the office buildings reaching into the sky which you have been able to construct, the Park Avenue penthouse you occupy and the Connecticut hideaway to which you dash on week­ends have not accrued to you as a result of your contact with Commies, Pink~h~;II~~vveT~~~~e[~ ;~u Llte::t:·~h C[~!P~Pe~~~~~s :t~h~e~~~~ts~ld American Free Enterprise system which has functioned in your inter­est even as you sought to tear it down. There is nothing about the American Free Enterprise system to be ashamed of, pals. and nothing for which you need apologize. ll is a grand and glorious institu~ion which has enabled us to play Santa Claus to the whole world includmg the support of the lousy bums" who think up arguments against it for which you pay them good money. It is a system which enables those who have the vision, initiative end character, to rise above the common herd and bring to fulfillment that latent desire that reposes in the hreast of every good American­the desire to plan, to dream, to earn and to own. It inspires and encourages •him not only to strive for a living for himself and his family but to seek to accumulate as much of this world's goods as possible in order to have the proud privilege of leaving a sub· 11tantial inheritance to his children and his children's children. There is only one shameful corollary of the American Free Enter· ~~~~~i~;{~;;·b~a\~ea~~~}n~~l ish~~~e c~~~~;~e~~~n~~e cdnst~~f, ~~t \~~hi~~ they train government sleuths to track down and ferret out the last dollar of the citizen and who spend all their time devising ways and means to take his monev awav from him as fast as he can make it You see. they folloW the· Party Line too, and they, also, want to re-distribute the wealth. You have done a good job for your Uncle Joe, pals. and it is largely due to your efforts in his behalf that it now requires almost the entire time of a Committee of the Congress of the United States to keep track ()f the Pinks and the Fellow Travellers who have been influenced in their perverted thinking by the lies and misrepresentations which you have caused to be set in type and sold to the reading public. whilff{~bh~fcoi~~ip~~ec~U~t~~~~t~Y~n~~i~~~!r:J~£~~·1~~~~~~~.Ym0:r;:~~~s;~u abe~ long in that category. Anyway, since the count_ry which ha~ bf'cn k_ind to you and showered y~u with the aood things of life is.bemgassailed on all s1dcs by the domesticenem1es who are largely of :vour creahon, how tbout mak1n~ ~ ~est~re of. lltonement? Why not let this be th~ gr<'al moment of dec1s1on m wh1ch you resolve, as an act of expiation for: your edttorial ~ins. ~o turn arou!ld and tq' to rctra.ce your steps back toward a policy of personal tpatnohsm and ]ournalistlc intcgnty. How about it, chums? Why not quit playing on Uncle Joe's team and start rooting for Uncle Sam? Whynotgiveyourowncountryabr(>ak. fora change? The Southern Conservative North Carolinian Reviews The Glori Warns That Political Carpetbaggers, Aided By Renegade Southerners, Are As Hell-Bent on Reconstructing Us Now Ao They Were In The Period Following The Dark Days of '61, (This address by W. E. Debnam, well-known radio news commen. tator of Raleigh, North Carolina, was delivered to members of the Texas Press Association at their recent annual convention at Dallas. Mr. Deb­nam whose book ''Weep No More My Lady" Is now nearing a sales volume of 200,000 is best known and respected in the South as the one who has perhaps come nearer than any other person to accomplishing the superb task of putting Eleanor Roosevelt in her place. "Weep No More My Lady" was written and published following a trip of this International meddler to North Carolina which she later described in her column as a "charming place of magnolias, lavender and old lace," but indicated that she never went into that part of the country and came away without a "certain sense of sadness" for the poverty and unhappiness there to which "one must shut one's eyes". nweep No More My Lady" must have set her back on her heels for subsequent columns steered clear of the sub­ject of the South'~ unhappiness and poverty-The Editor) I propose !() talk like a Southerner .•. and at the same time an American: a Southerner 11nd an American who glories in the fact that each allegiance complements the other and adds double lUster to a heritage beyond compare. I have M intention of waving unduly the Confederate flag. We are all agreed .•. or I imagine, most of us , , , that the L()St Cause wal better lost. I am glad, as was Henry W. Grady, of Georgia, that eloquent spokesman for the South just before the turn of the Century, and quoting him now: "I am glad that omniscient God he!d the balance of battle in His Almighty Hand and that human slavery was swept forever from American soil and that American Uni()n saved from the wreck of war." We are today one Nation, 11\ld nr.;•here does national loyalty burn with a purer flame than south of the Mason·Dixon line. But, although we follow, and proudly, the Stars and Stripe&, we still honor a»d revere the Stars and Bars. We shall ne,•er forget that emblem. And, by the same token, as long as time shall last we shall never cease to hold fast in our hearts all of love and veneration for those brave men who followed the immortal Lee as members of that mighty host of heroes whose banners, even in defeat, were tipped with glory. And by the same token, too, there is enshrined in every true southern heart the same love, the same veneration, for those brave women of the Confederacy who, th~ttgh the four dark years of war waited anxiously at home, often with the bayonet of tile invader at their throat, and when the fighting was over, when the verdict had been scaled at the cannon's mouth. marched hand in hand with their men-those who came back- through the twelve long and terrible years that were the Gethsemane of Re­construction; that Gethsemane during which the prostrate South was a conquered land at the mercy o{ a horde of carpet-baggers and renegade Southerners who grew fat and sassy as they fed like jackals upon what they thought was the carcass of a civili­zation War, as Sherman said, is hell .. , but it's a hell that has about ita certain dignity, There was nothing of dignity about Reconstruction. There was ()Illy the studied, deliberate debasement of a proud and defenseless people as old Thaddeus Stevens and his gang set out to murder the South In the first degree. Their murderous assault, prompted by greed and revenge, was cold-blooded and pre-meditated. They worked night and day at the job of killing the South for twelve long and bitter years. They almost succeeded, Only the vitality of a civilization and a culture that simply refused to die kept the South alive. In addition to a wrecked economy the whole social structure of the South, built up through generation&, was in turmoil. The bottom rail was on top, held there by a Federal bayonet. ' There's no need to review in detail that saturnalia of official C()!'!"uption and waste during which the new rulers, strutting like peacocks, set out deliberately to turn to their ()Wn personal profit every cent of taxes that could be wrung from the people of a prostrate land. There's no need to review the looting not only of the public but oi the privat• purse. Thet•e's one t~ing, however, that seems to me rather significant. That is that while a lot of white despoilers got filthy rich-not a few presenl·day fortunes in the South, and in the hands of folks who fly mighty high on occasion, were made possible by the fact Grandpa was a hard-working carpet-bagger or scalawag or bu£falo bless.ed with no more conscience than a goat and with a keen eye for a nice plantation or a well-paying Federal job--while a lot of white despoilers g()t filthy rich, mighty few Negroes gained any real economic advantage from Reconstruction. Their False Friends, even as today, made a lot of glowing promises other than forty acres· and a mule. They patted the liberated slaves on the back and ate with them and slept with them and danced with them and invited them into their homes. They talked mightily about social equality. But when the payoff came, when the economic b()nes of the South had been picked clean and the Southern patriots managed finally to drive out the vultures, it was the Great Friend, the Great Reformer from the North who got the loot and the S()uthern white man and the Southern Negro who were lett holding the bag. And what a bag! It was filled to the top and packed down with broken hopes and bitter memories. But that's enough about Reconstruction. It's darkwateroverthedamof history. You may wonder why I recount in even the slightest detail a tragic story we all know so well. The purpose, to borrow a phrase from the navigator, is to get a "fix", In order to determine where we are. we must tAke a sight on where we've been. Just 86 ye&rs ago--and 86 years as history is measured is but the beat of a swat. low's wina-jutt 86 years ago when the Southern soldier who had survived laid down ~---------J-ul~y-_A_u~gu_st~,_19~Sl_ ___________________T ~H=E~S=O=UT~H=E-RN~C-ON_S_E_RV_A_T_IV_E __________________________P agel Glorious Record Of The South In Its Climb From The Depths Of Despair ogado Now f '61, rexas Deb­sales g the More ional 1n as :ated thout reto have • sub-ican: a rortbe ~that !I from or and ohold edthe :venin art the h,..,..b of tie lignity. ekept I, built ere by orivate mt-day casion, alawag amce filthy uction. rthan e witb homes. picked l"sthe uthern nories. all been. swal-his arms and began his weary trek to his ruined home he had to begin all over again. It's the fashion now, once our armed forces have won a war, to begin building •P the economy of our former enemies. We have poured out billions of dollars to Germany and to Italy and to Austria and to Japan and other natious. We are to pour out billions more. All they need to do, apparently, is ask. But there was no Marshall Plan for the South 86 years ago. Jnstead of beal'ing &;ifts, our conquerors came in hordes demanding tribute and when, only 74 years ago, we finally managed to drive the rascals out, the South was bankrupt. We had almost no manufacturing. The only thing we had was the land, much of it mortgaged and all of it bled white by generations of wasteful farming practices, saddled by grim necessity with the mill­stone of a share-cropping economy. Henry Grady wasn't just romancing when he told, some sixty short years ago, of that funeral he attended in Pickens County, Georgia. He was telling the bitter truth not only of Pickens County but of almost every other county in the South. The grave, said Grady, was dug through solid marble but the marble headstone was from Vermont. The burial was in a pine wilderness, but the pine coffin came from Cincinnati. An iron mountain overshadowed the graveyard, but the coffin nails and screws came from Pittsburgh. Hardwoods and metals abounded, but the corpse was hauled on a wagon made in South Bend, Indiana. A hickory grove was nearby, but the pick and shovel handles came from New York. The cotton shirt on the dead man came from Cincinnati, the coat and breeches from Chicago and the shoes from Boston. The folded hands were encased in white gloves that came from New York and 1round the poor neck was twisted a cheap cravat from Philadelphia. The country so rich in undeveloped resources, says Grady, furnished nothing for the funeral but the corpse and the grave in which it awaited the final Judgment trump. And the poor fellow lowered to his rest on coffin bands from Lowell carried nothing Jnto the next world as a reminder of his home in this one save the halted blood in his veins, the chilled marrow in his bones and the echo of the dull clods that fell on his coffin lid. That was the South just 60 years ago. What a magnificent change we have wrought in less than two generations! What I magnificent change within the living memory of many of us gathered here tonight! Let's examine our economy for a few moments. Since 1939the South has increased its per capita income by 236 percent 115 com­pared to an increase of only 183 per cent in the rest of the country. That figure is conservative. Dr. Paul Chapman, associate dean o( the College of Agriculture of the University of Georgia, says the decade that ended with 1949 saw an increase in the annual spend­able income in the South, after paying living expenses, o! more than 375 per cent. Never in the history of the nat10n-ne"er in the history of any nation- has so great a gain been made in so short a time. Between the years 1939 and 1947-according to the Census of Manufacturers, and theratehasbeenacceleratedsince 1947- 16,000newfactorieswerebuiltinthe South. This was a gain of fifty percentascomparedwith 36perccnt!orthe rest o{the nation. An average of seven neW industrial plants, says Dean Chapman, have opened their doors for business in the South every worKing d<ty during the past ten years; and for every million dollars that went into the building o£ new plants by new corporations, 15 million dollars went into expansion of plants already in operation This industrial expansion has created in the South since 1940 approximately 1,250,000 new jobs in manufacturing. The United States Chamber of Commerce reports that for the five-year period 1944-1949 the national gain in new business establishments and related enterprises wa~ 30 per cent. For the Southeast during the same period, the gain was 43 per cent; for the Southwest 45 per cent. In all phases of business, wholesale, retail, service, financial, real estate, insur­ance, transportation and all others, the South has outgained the Nation during the post-war years by 14 per cent The South leads the Nation in the percentage of electrified farms and in the in­ltallationofruraltelephones There was a time, and not so long ago, when the South was a vassal of Old King Cotton. Cotton isn't king any more. 1t has gone the way of a lot of other monarchs. We still raise a lot of cotton ... but Southern farmers for a generation now have been going in more and more for diversification Thousands and tens of thousands of old cotton acres are green now almost all th• year 'round with lush pasture grasses and in a lot of pastures you'll see great herdsoffatbeefanddairycattle. We have taken the textile industry away from New England, the furniture busi­ness away from Michigan and the. oil business away from Pennsylvania. We are cutting deeper and deeper into the shoe business of Massachusetts and one day, if things keep on going the way they are now, we'll take the beef business, what isn't already in Texas, away from the Middle West and the dairy business away from Wisconsin. We have as you know taken the Hydrogen Bomb building business away from everybody. We aren't claiming that the South is a land where everybody has a money-tree and all he has to do is go out and shake it every morning and pick up the dollars. Government economists have gone into a trance and estimated the annual per capita income in the South in 1949 at $981 as compared to $1 ,524 for the rest of the Nation. We still have a long way to go ... but we're gaining, and gaining fast. Jn this advance both Negroes and whites, working together. have prospered. The advancement of the American Negro has been without parallel in human history. Only 86 years ago he was a slave without property, without education, with­out tradition, a chattel to be beught and sold. Today as one rides along Southern roads-and they're paved roads, incidentally, Jn most instances-he can see at frequent intervals prosperous !arms owned by men whose ancestors, less than three generations ago, were slaves. HeseesNegroschoolsandcolleges; not as many as there should be, it's true, but more are being built. He sees prosperous Negro stores and churches and homes Jn the South one can see instances without number of Negro men and Negro women living in peace and dignity with their w~ite neighbors It's true that one will also see Negroes living like animals in slums ... slums almost as bad as those in Harlem and within a stone's throw of the nation's capitol in Washington. But in our Southern slums, as in slums everywhere. you'll also find white families livin,2: upon the same scale. Jn our Southern society, as in society everywhen!, ability and honesty and integrity and enterpri se-or the lack of these qualities-dete rmine to a large degree how higla oneeatsuponthehog. No one- thAI is no one with any real integrity- \dll insist that our racial relationt areastheyshouldbe. They're far from it in the South, as they are in the North and just about every. where else. We are making progress-real progress- toward better racial relations in the South. We have made here ... and history bears out this statement ... more progress in racial understanding and cooperation and in a shorter time than in any other area In all the world. Nowhere else $ince time began has an alien race, shackeled in slavery, made such an advance-economic and social and cultural- as has the Negro in the South within the space of a single lifetime. To what is this progress due? It's due in part to the Negroes themselves .. but it's also due and in no small measure to the understanding and help and cooperation and financial assistan ce and advice of the Southern white man. Despite this progress.,, despite this outstanding record ... there still remains a certain type of damyankee, a certain type of reneg<~ te Southerner, a certa in type of political carpetbagger hell -bent as were their forebears on reconstructing us There still remains that great claque of holier-than ·thou reformers that persists In shouting through the press, on the inovie screen, over radio and television, And evt>n on the floor o! the Congress of the United States the age-old slander that the South is a backward land peopled in the main by low·browed hoodlums, shufflin' down the road with a mint julep in one hand and an old piece of rope in the other. going some place to lynch some Negro who, if he got his just deserts, would be el ected Governor. That old story has been going the rounds ever since Harriet Beecher Stowe took pen in hand and wrote Uncle Tom's Cabin. This is the same Mrs. Stowe, incidenhtlly. whojustoneyearaflerthe War was over moved South bag Hnd baggage to a planta,. lion in Florida. Jt's significant, H seems to me, that Mrs. Stowe never wrote a sequel to Uncle Tom after she moved South and could observe conditions at close range. But she did write some observations to her brother, Henry Ward Beecher, in the North. "Corrupt politicians," she wrote, "are already bE-ginning to speculate on the Negroes as possible capital for their schemes". How true in 1866! And how true, unfortunately, in 1951! Only abysmal Ignorance or deliberate political scheming- and I su spect it 's 1 combination of both-could possibly explain the continued carping criticism by these merchants of discord- both male and female-of just Hbout everything south of the Mason-Dixon line ~hile they ignore even worse conditions in their own back yard. I propose that we do something about it. I'm reminded now of the story of that ragged, footsore group of Conft'clrrat~ soldiers who. mArching home from Appomattox stopped one ni ght by the side of the road to eat the eve ning meal of parched corn. As they Jay around the campfire th~ talk turned to what t>ach man planned to do, now that the war was over and lost. Some said they pl:mned to go to Mexico or South America. Others planned to ~o to Europe, several had no plans as they looked into the da1·k future. F'inallv someone turned to the raggedest, weariest-lookin( fellow in the group and said: "John, what do you plan to do?" "J tell you what I'm going to do." said John. ''I'm ~oin~ home to Texas, I'm going lo kiss my wife and raise me a crop and if the damyankees meSIJ with me any more I'm goin' to lick 'em all over again." I tell you. my friends, the carpetbaggers and the abolitionists are me<;-.in{( with us again. They've been messing with us ever since Apnomattox, in fact, and here 91 late they've grown bolder and increasingly unrestrained in their attacks. It's time we gave them their come-uppance. The South too long has fought a guerilla aclion against the slanders that 11re being poured out against us. T propose that, as in '61, we close ranks and this time lick them at their own game. I propose that we begin, and soon, a concerted, well-organized. well financed, well-planned "Know The South" campaign. J propose that we organize in the South an all-embracing Southern Association of Commerce whose job it will be to tell and tt-ll overagaintherealstoryofSouthernprogress It's a mAgnificent story, a story that has no counterpart in all of history, but it'l a story that will never be printed by any national publisher. Oh they'll publish stuff about the South! They're glad to, but almo<;t without exception it's the Tobacco Road and Strange Fruit type of stuff turned out by literary prostitutes who, as is the WAY of the profession, abandon all of truth, all of deceney, with the one idea of pleasing the customer. There are any number of best sellers that could be written-that ha\'e been written-by Southern writers, stories that tell the truth but, as things are now. they are doomed as was the flower on the cranied wall to blush unseen in some bureau drawer and waste their sweetness in the desert air of a rejeclion slip. I propose th<~t this Southern Association of Commerce either go into the publish­ing business itself to handle worthy manuscripts or subsidize their publication I propose that we make use of the mediums of radio and television to tell the story, the true story of the South, not as a Claghorn but calmly, factually, interestin~ly so all the nation may know and understand and appreciate I propose that we buy space in national publications to tell the story again and again and again. Such a program. J know, will cost a lot of money. but it will be worth a lot at money. It 'll open the eyes of a Jot of misguided people to the fact that the South. despite its progress. has only begun to exploit its tremendous resources. It may even dry the eyes of a lot of Southerners who are too prone to weep along with our mis-- guided critics. · It may possibly even open the eyes of Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt. The South is no longer bankrupt. We have the money and a lot of it. There are any number of S()Uthern corporations, any number of Southern business men whG could pay most of the freight with tax dollars that now go down the drain o£ wasteful Federal spending in Washington If the American Tobacco Company can spend millions of do1Iars every year selling cigarettes, if General Motors and Chrysler and Forcl can do the same to sell aut~ mobiles, if General Elech'lc and other corporations can spend millions every yeaP selling radios and_ refrigerators and washing machines and tele~ision sets ... thc,!l the South. J subm1t. could very well spend millions to tell the true story o( Southern progress. It would prove. I bf'lieve, an excellent investment. Let's quit taking it sitting down! ~·-'--------------------------T_H_I_S_O_UT_H_E_RN~CON_ S_ IR_V_A_TI_VI __________~ _______Ju~ ly_-_A_~~u-•1,_1_ "_1 1uggeslion Of Coalilion Movemenl Gels Favorable Reaclion In Soulh Byrd Says Soulh Is Slepchild Of New Mexican Cilizen Says World Russia Offers To End The Truman Democralic Party Planners Are Saboleurs Her War Againsl Us There was one addres' at a Jefferson- A se~·enty-eight year old citizen ot An- If any evidence were needed that the Jackson Day Dinner recently that would thony, New Mexico, forwards a communica- United Nations is a comical farce instead ln support of his proposal for a coalition not have shamed and embarrassed these tion which he h111 prepared for the South- of a world force !or peace and unity, it or conservative ~publicans and Democrats long dead statesmen, as most of the farcical ern Conservative dealing with a subject was furnished in the cease-fire proposal. in I ht" 1952 e~ect~on for the purpos~ of r~ offerings of this nature in recent years that is new to us, a.nd expressing 1 view· Instead of this proposal coming from the atonng ConstltutJonal government 1n th1s would have done if these immortal Demo· point which is unique. Chinese Communists against whom we were country, Senator Ka.rl Mundt of South Da· crats could have he11rd them. He is Colonel Hubert H. Heath who supposed to be waging war, or a Police kula has bC'en makmg addresses tn many The exception was the talk of Senator says: Action, if you will, the initial suggestion aecl IOns of the country, . Harry F. Byrd who spoke in Atlanta and "The Southern Conservative is eminently came from Jacob Malik of Russia, 1lu> J't>ac~ion of the people ot D1xie to laid down the ultimatum to sound Demo- correct in slating that then is a 'Master Apparently those who believe in the U.N. tm !o,ugg:c~tJO~s ha~e convn1ced hun that crats as to the program which tpust be Plan' for the wrecking of the United as an effective medium for fighting aggres­thP coaill10n Jdea JS practical and can be followed i( lhe party of Jefferson and Jack- States. sion, saw nothing ridiculous in the fact that a('hJ~•red . son is to be restored to respecLability. "In pursuance of the plan for world- it was one of our supposed co-partners in , •·u 1 ~ my. studied opm10n ar_ter many Senator Byrd's suuestion for purifying wide sabotage o! civilization and the es- that body. Russia, which made the proposal 9Lsth to OtxJe: that the South IS one of what he called "the Truman Democratic tablishment of a worldwide military die- instead of the Chinese Communists, thereby th~· ~real . ~as~JOns of human freedom, of Party" were: tatorship with Russia u the pattern, the conceding what any disinterested and fair- ~r~;~,t~R ~~~li~;:~i:a~~ ;!n!i:~e~~~~~~t:.~~ th:T::ut~~!h a i~i~:~·ii;~:t~~!· D1!m~r~~~ ~~::ita~o:O:o:~e o:r~i;:;;g a~t~!~~e:a:::~~: ~;i;~:~e~~:~n t~~re::: akg~~:;~sa\h~~:~~ 'I gather t~at from the reacltons of many party, but no Democratic President can be poisons in their food and water. This is Chmese stooges. audlf'nces whiCh I have addreiised in every elected without the votes of the Southt;rn supplied under the fraudulent pretense How in the name of all that's holy can Southern State; I ~lieve that because of States. that it is 'enrichment' of food and 'purifi· we hope for effective results from an organ­tht> courageous voting record of many of "In 1831 the two-thirds rule was estab- cation' of water. ization of nations in which one of the mem­J' 0\1! Southrrn Senators and Representatives; Jished. It was repealed in 1936. The two- Not one person in a thousand even hers is prosecuting a war by remote contt·ol I fE'f'l . sure of that because o£ what_ 1 ha\'e thirds rule was a protection to minorities dreams what is going on but it is all against other member nations of that body! 1'1•ad tn hundre~s. of letters reachmg me in the Democratic party just as the Con- water over the wheel of the World plot: We're asking you. from Sou~hern Clbzens, 1 feel convmced o! stitution is a protection to minorities among ters. The Bible tells us that "The life o( 1----------------- ~~,~:1 ~~~:~1 ~n1~~ ~~~:;f~ea;:._:\~~~~~~r:;:i ~~: rc~!~~~~~~~·o~~hee ~:~~-~h~~~:u!~,:~~~~~ ~~~:~~:: ~~dinB~~;~:~~aond'~r~~!t~::d:·~~=~ We. believe that t~e majority of •J~dh>ns has foun~ .the South Jn the 1_nam 1952 national convention before candidates that the characte1· of the flesh depends Amencan people are SICk almost unto Yotmg for an Ad~•mstratwn and a Natwnal are voted on almost entirely on the character of the death about aU the yakity-yak about pro~~·am which m my opmwn is not Ol_tly "We can i~sist on a resolution reaffirm- minerals of the bloodstream. "racial prejudice". Why. not for a httnllt':tl tn the South ?ut lo. all Amenca ing support of States' rights by the Demo- Once known as Alchemy and Black Art, change start talking a bout' racial :~·.~ :;~;·;~,j1o/.~;1 or'~~~;~;;:', ~ti::;,~goaot ~~:~~.J.adrt~Y ~; •;;u~:n~·~::;: :",.~~~~: ::: ::!~1~"~;~;:;l~mii~a:;i:~r~s~:ok~~~~·;~t pride ;nd encourage both the white du~''/111~\!:.::e:hoot~h:f r:1;~,.~a;~ ~Ph~~~teo~~ tion was def~at~ by a record vote._ ~~e~ ~~:~r ~~:::i:e::~i~nas~ in Russia and ~;~itec~~~~e r:(c~~u~!~"~h!~;~ ~~ve~ t,;~··;;:;",;~:~~; ~~,~~!~,;;du:,~:, w:>;.;; pl;·,%~'t~a~"~:, ';.".~".~~:C:,~·~~;:ns~~~u~ drJ::' ,:' ~~~:,~~~~d\~~;• ;:.:,~~~ t;~~n~~: :~t~eme prid~ in their ;ace and jeal­~' il·~~~~~t.out of this unhappy political pre· tJ:~;~eor ;::~l:s:~~ ms~~l~ur:. a. great an_d i:!n:!~~le :~tC: m~!s ~~lsisci~:~~· th~;uh~~~~~ T~: yc~~~::~. :!c!r~~ou~do~::~h~~~~~~ 'Tom;equently, for well owr a year I ~mghty force. Ill the D~mocratJc party If acti\'e, caustic poison on the plea that pnde m the1r race and want to keep lla,·e been suggesting thal the time is here It has the Will to do 1 ~· The South ha.s it is to "Prevent mottling of teeth in chi! it intact. tnd the rea.,ons most abundant for develop· been trea~ed as a st~:~pchtld by the Truman dren.'' All these deviltries are offered -o-- tn~ a workable and realistic alliance be- Democrattc part~ too long. under a lying pretense that they are to twe('n \'Oters of the Norlh and South so that :·w~ can inSISt upon a return to the accomplish some great good and all are When Free Enterprise Functions ~~:~i~=~t '":~~ r~~~he~a~:m;n c~r~~~~e ::~ ~~~:;~~.le:r 0t~:~~fa~~so~:;::s J:~~o~ ~~~ ~;v~~:~!~u~~e ~~~~d :~~~esr:s.and Planners Without Benefit Of Government aupporling a po~itical plat(orm designed to this w1ll be gomi back to the ho~se. and In the early thirties the University of Tt'~lo~e and ~cv1tahze U1e opportunity sys- buggy days, but~ say that the true pn~c1ples Arizona made a statewide survey to dis- An example of how the wonderful l<'m 111 Ameru:!a. I urge you to devote your of our constitut1onal democracy are 1mmor- cover the cause of mottling of chiJdren's system of American Free Enterprise rl'niu~. your. tal<'nls, your thinking, and tal and those Iun~amentals can not be teeth and found in every case it was where can build a city without assistance your em·,·~<·tlc efforts to helr' formulate dimmed by age or distorted by demagogues. the waters carried Flourine and demon· from governmental agencies has been l<llll<' sudt political alliance in America "Let me say I am the kind of Democrat strated its dangerous tendencies in flourine pointed up by McLellan Smith, Wash· lh•fMt> it i.~ too late. who wants, above everything else, to see fed to animals, producing mottling of ington, D. C., publicity man, who 'Twrhe States o( the so-called 'solid the real DE>mocratic party preserved and teeth and injuries to the tooth structure writes: Iouth' han• it within th<'ir powt>r to deter- strengthened. I am the kind of a Democrat beyond doubt. "Anti-free enterprise Fair Dealers •11ne the destiny of America. By embracing who intends to oppose to the utmost of his Later the University oi New Mexico made awakened one morning recently to end supporting the concept of the all-power- capacity measures that are unconstitutional, a like survey and corroborated all the learn that nearby suburban Silver tut. the all-inclush•e, the almighty Central socialistic, and destructive of the principles former survey had shown. The latter is· Spring, Maryland, had come up with a CO\'Nnment they can destroy the la~>t ves- of government established by our fore- sued a bulletin showing that 0.9 parts per most distressing example of what a tlgt-s of Slates Rights and or individual [athers. I am an old-f<lshioned Democrat million constitutes the critical point. hustling group of free enterprisers can r~~hts in this Republic. By couraJ(eously who believes in a rigid standard of honesty Many sincere men have been taken in do to build a community without suck· teiE"cting every candidate and every plat- in our public oUicials" by the subtle propaganda circulated to ing the teat of the National Treasury. form of E'\'ery political party that would accomplish this particularly devilish pi£>ce Just a fe_w short years ago - less earry us toward the shoals of StatE' Social· The Honorable Robert Lee Bobbitt of sabotage "or the mental faculties of the than 10-SIIver Springs was a somno1· l'im and the totalitarian State. the Soulh fo~mer attorney general of Texas: people. Once the frontal brain is killed by ent s~burb of Washington, a little city and the South alone can slow down and pomts out that the advocates of Fed- either surgical or chemical lobotomy the ?f qmet homes on shady streets. And perhap!'l completely stop these dangerous eral control o( the Tidelands have a victim loses all powers of initiation and is tt's still a city of Quiet homes on shady trt'nds b£>fore it is too late. new hot propaganda line on the sub- a cowlike mentality, incapable of construe- streets, but now it's a big city of more •·By joining with like-utinded voters of ject. Originally, they contended that tive mental work but eminently fitted for than 200,000 and still growing. the North regardless o£ party label who the steal of the Tidelands was engi- slavery and servile obedience. About five years ago, Silver Spring will support and sustain policies, programs, neered because it was necessary that The resulting mental and moral lethat·gy merchants passed the hat among them· and prcsid<'nlinl aspirants dedicated to the the Federal government have juris- is evident throughout the world. The para- selves and raised $800,000 to buy park· aneiE>nt and honorable American eonc=ept diction over it in the interest of na- lytic effect of mass drugging on the (ron- ing space for 6,000 cars in the center of defining Go\"ernment as a device for tional defense. Now they are propos- tal brain results in an animalistic person· of a then small business district. Since prov1ding a fair chance for a free people ing that the income from the Tide- ality devoid of moral understanding or of each space was used by an average of thP South can lead the way baclr: to the lands be used for educational pur- initiative mental work. three cars daily, the full total accom· hii,!h mountain tops of human freedom. In· poses in all the States. The accompanying physical languor Is modation came to 18,000 cars. And, dindual initiati,·e, private entt>rprise, and ---o- widely prevalent. The moral ruin of any mind you, the merchants ponied up thf' ~ight'l of men and States here in According to Senator George W. Ma- people must precede their enslavement. t~e money--didn't ask Congress fo~ a A~~~;~~~~ grt>al Nation is again to become 1o~e. of ~evad~. every Democratic ad- !:rC:~rn2t 1~a~:~ ~:~::e;er:,n::rl~di~!~~ ~:~ne or appeal for a Federal grant-m- :~at!:~:~t~u;~~~l~s ~~~o~f ~:It> i;;;:tl~~!~~~~ ~~~::~~a~t~sn b:~:~~~k~:p~~; ~~no~b!~ ~: ~i~~1~ni~rg~~~:~ t~i~h~o~er;urat:i~0:: -~~~e t~~~ )~~ ~~~r~s~u be the judge teri!>tics that has made it great and kept w.ar". He says they are JUSt wearmg amply finanred with its votarie$ sitting in In 1950 Silver Spring's re(ail busi· 1t lflrong, the South has an opportunity for htm out. seats of great power. ness volume totaled up $32,000,000 IPadership and service in the cause of free- --o--- against $5,400,000 in 1946! ::~~,..;e~ic~n :~~ ;;~~~:a~~~~t~~al~e~o~~ of ~~:~:~~de t~sh:~~~~~;:at~~e~i:~.~ ~~~ me~~e~a;d~~fa~~ ~f c~~~m1~tve~::t ne;se~r~~~y a\~~S ~!~~~~e~P;fn$g3,~~g~: hope and belte,·e that t_he South will prove gram. Srr Stafford Crtpps now_repo!ts every Communist is an advocate of 000-now that assessment h~s moved Itself wot1h)· of that m1ghty challenge." ~rca~ ~~~~~e a1~~t ~~~~na~~~~ \~U:~~~~~~~ Worid government. Think that over. rtti~~ ~5&~0J~~2g~ ~::r:~~=d ~~6ou0 !1a~:rb:::r~r!~:e~e:~ru~~e~e;~ i~!s ~~::s~t~ :~gn~~n~r~~rn~~ r~:~ !~:i~o~~c~~l!~~~ E~ery perso~ \~rking. to ~e~~~~~t&l:~rmS~~j~~O t~e o;ee:o~~Oi~~~: Plan in operation Now we have an Eisen· to "soak the poor". Thus we have an abolish the :U~ted States ~s.a nat10n est city in Maryland. ho~'er Plan coming up whirh ealls for illustration of what to ~xpect in this and make tt mto ~ domtmpn of a It all adds up to the fact that priv· billion<~ more to go down the drain. God country which is pursulllg the same world gover~ment IS a trattor . and ate enterprise is worth a dozen Fair · spE"ed the day when we have an American policy. should be tned for treason. Deal agencies, all o( them primarily Plan desi~ed to keep American funds in - o - -----o-- designed to raid the public treasury Amt'rica and whose purpo~e is to promote Let our object he our country, our whole God grants liberty only to those who lo\·e for the benefit of a horde of Pender-the wE>l(are or the taxpayers of this country country and nothinJ but our country - it and are always ready to guard and de· gasters fattening on the public pay for a rhange. Daniel Webster fend it - Daniel Webster. roll~" ~uly-Auguol, 1951 THE SOUTHERN CONSERVATIVI MY NIGHT, By Ida M. Darden Copies of the First Edition of this book of satire are still avail· able. Eaeh book Is enclosed In a strong m anila envelope ready for mailing to your friends and a ssociates when a ddressed a n d stamped. Do your part In figh ting a gainst the Socialistic proposals of left· w ing female columnists by ~elplng to give wide circulation to MY NIGHT. . ....................................................... . If you have not already ordered copies please do so now, using the attached blank for that purpose. 'SJOO Price Eaeh Freedom from fnterfer•nce by the Federal government. Freedom to work without being forced to join a Labor Union. Freedom in the choi<e of usociates without d ictation f rom racial equality agita tors. Freedom to earn, to save and to own property without fear of con. fisc:a t ion by Federal taxing authorities. OSCAR BOBS UP WITH A NEW SOCIALIZED MEDICINE PLAN The Honorable Oscar Ewing, head of one of the governmental rackets in Washington caJled the Social Security Administration and a Screwball Supreme in an administration where screwballs are routine, has just come out with another Socialized Medicine scheme. His own personal interpretation of the Constitution of the United States and of the basic laws of the Republic has imbued him with only one idea and that is a firm conviction that one of the prime responsibilities of the government is to give the citizen an enema. Consequently, he has spent a large portion of his life trying to get Congress to set up free mechanics for this and similar operations. His latest scheme is in the form of a bill soon to be introduced in our national lawmaking body providing for sixty days of free hospitalization a year for persons "sixty-five or older and for widows and orphans of w.age earners" presumably whether they need it or not. All of his previous attempts to get Socialized Medicine legislation through Congress has resulted in getting his ears slapped down but the persistent Oscar does not give up. He reminds us of Old Jeff, a superannuated bull on the ranch ad­joining the farm where we lived as a child. Having outlived his usefulness, Old Jeff was put in one of the smaller pastures where he roamed the range and constantly got into mischief. He .would wear himself to a shadow walking miles along the fence line trymg to find a rotten post. When he found one, he would ram and batter it with his horns until he had so . weakened it that he was able to get his head through first and, finally, hi s whole body. Oscar evidently figures that if he can get his head through a crack with free medical service to certain groups, he will eventually be able to work the whole body of Socialized Medicine through the fence, and thereby accomplish piecemeal what he cannot achieve in one fell stroke. The Southern Cons•rvative, 703 Flatiron Building, Dote . •••• ••• • •• • ,., •• Fort Worth, Texas Enclosed is cheek for $ . , • . , . , . fo r ... , , . copies of "My Night." ···N;~~ · ······ ·· ·· · ··· · ·· · · · ········· ciiy" ..... " ""' " " " Sloto MY NIGHT By the Editor At a plenary se~si on of the Commission on Moriat Prh ileges o( Amalgamllitod Countr ies several nigh ts a]i(o a very intere:sti ng and informfltive discussion wa!' hf'ld wh ich was pa r t1ci pat~d in by delegates f rom twenty-f i\'C na tions but, after dehbtU"a&,. ing all night, they were u nable to r each a ny definite conclusion 'I1le qu e..,tion to be dt>ci ded was whether the ('(IH·nant which we ue preparinf as the basis on which the machinery of the world ,llOvernment will operate, shall permit a person to keep the money he earns or whether it shall be placed in a commoa fund and divided equally between all needy individuals in our new World State. f My views on the subj~t, ol course, very definitely fa\or • ' uniform distribution of all money and property on the humanj, tarian th.eory of "lakin& from each according to hill ability and ' givingtoeachaccordingtohisneed" but,{orobviousreasona.f was quite embarrassed when I '1\U a:sked to preside o\·er tht session having this policy under consideration. "' Naturally, I feel that if we are to attain our glob.] objet'UVf t of social justice for all , we must deny the right of any on• per101l ~ to possess more of this world 's goods than another. At the same time, I am not yet in position where I am willinC to surrender my own Pf"UOnal fortune in the interest of the general welfare. Although a staunch advocate of the re-distribution o{ the financial as10ets o' others, I feel that , in my cAse, it is necessary that I be allowed to keep t he million' of dollars I have been able to accumulate in order that I may co ntinue to travel over the world and point mtt the responsibility of every one else to join in a univenal share·the-weaJth program. 1 !eel that my position in this matter is perfec:tly logical since my concern II solely for the greateat good to the greatest number, butT was afraid that Reaction· aries might re~ard my attitude as a little Inconsistent and that they might even lnsid that l either divide my own money with the under-privileged classee or quit tryin• to compel others to do so. For this reason, I did not think it wise for me lo preside over the session Ytbich was called to pass on the matter and so I suggested in!'tead, the name of Mr. I. Wilt Steele, treasurer of a labor organitation, who was unanimously chosen as chairman forthe.!Hning. Since we were unable to reach any decision, the IOubjecl was postponed and will be taken up for further consideration at soml' future date. At the next night's session, I was very happy to find that less conlron~ rs ial problems were on the agenda for solution and that the matters listed for discus:siOJl were those on which it was easier for the delegates to reach harmonious agreemt·nl. These included unanimous approval of a bill soon to be introduced in Congres1 which will provide that the United States go\'ernmenl make an outright gi!t of fifty million dollars worth of b3nana splits to starving Himalayan hop growers who l1ave suffered serious economic losses as a result of a widespread epidemic of hoof and mouth disease among East Indian water buffaloPs. Another construclive action taken at this session was one providing for st•llinC up the mechanin for a proposed International Matrimonial Service for the younc people of the world Ythit'h will sponsor a program of organized courtships, planned weddings and supervised honeymoons . Before the close of the session, a very heartwarming report was presented to the General Asse-mbly by the Social Service Division showing the splendid pro~ress that has be.-n made by that group in its efforts to organize a section of the Commi'<!'ion on Morta.l Pri,·ile~es "'hol'e long-range objecthe •iU be to provide a bubble bath and a free bottle of Hadaeol to every shar«ropper in the South. ((.'Op)Tigbt 1951 by ] ~ l4 Darden) r ... • THI SOUTHERN CONSERVATIVI July-Autuot, lftt WHEN THE IRRESISTIBLE FORCE Methodist Layman Withholds Here's Hoping The MEETS THE IMMOVABLE OBJECT Contributions To Mini~ters Who New Texas Election . Oppose Free Enterpnse Bill Gets The Job Done \fli~~ ~~~~;la~~;~~~~~~al?t~vi~~td0 t~~ No Edition Of The Paper s•r• Thow Who Disp.rase o~r lconomlc br~g b~~ou7h;;~e:t:Ie~~;~:r~" c~~~~s ~~~ f eople, hypocnbcal and smug asser- W'll B I d I A J System Are Di•lov•l to the Church and been signed by Governor Allan Shivers ions always fall thick_ and fa st from I e ssue n ugus the Government. As the goverrror points out, the meas~r• l~~.,l~c7rh~~v~~t ~~c~~~~~t~ ~~~~~!da~~ Continuing a custom we started From the first edition of the Southern ~o~tains both good and. bad features but tn. ~ast year, we will publiS~l. no ~aper Conservative, we have p~eaded with those tto;:s t~orb:h~~~ei~ :~:t d~s.;ervdes the pur4 f)o~h~i~~:: ~~ tr~e C~:~slnL:~~~~::~~~ ~~t~:~~t ~~~:~[e~ebx~r ~dttJOn will be ~~ 0:a~~!~ms~~fs~h~n\:ft!~:t~~~r~~~8°~~~ P ~here is one feature ~teu: however, ta~t ~~ss~~~~~~~~e ~:~ ~~~~i~t~t~~:~t wi~~a~I~h n~~; :~~~~o~~b~~~ ~~~~r~~ ~!~!;u~o i~~~;~tti~;:il t~he~ui!tr:~;~~~~ut~:~ ~h~~~a:ee:; !~e:~~o~o P~:~~:!esanfn a~!~~r! d e livered to that body that made na~~,h~:e cto" ~~tch up on extraneous and get right. co;~:~!:~ct~:~n~;s t~! ~~~lth w::x::imarily Jfense.' . work which has piled up in the office . We have not b~en .able to see any sense influenced by the cute little cu stom of de~l~~sat~~a; otP~o~~.~. ~~G~~~!~~~~~~ ~~Y ~~ua"J!~~~~s pf:~f0{~;o~~e:t~; i~~ ~~r::~h0 ~~7 c~~:1r~~~~n~r~:0~n7e0r:e;;s::;s~ f:1~11i:~~::s~i~~~r~~~~r;e~~~~·v;!Y~o~~t?; ~o newspal!er edt~or . of Galveston creasing the circulation of the paper. tern to .mtmster~ who ha~e. become m- an election to find out how many votes ~~ ~a~ft!~~~so~~rl~:~~~~lst~l\h~o~~~ to ~~~~~e~~~!Y,0fea1~i~r~!r~nf~~e~~~~ ~::tet~;~~~:; ~~r~:Y0 ~0S~c~::;:; ::a~::: hi~! f~;ored .candidate n.e~d~: and then gamblin~ in his county: " [ don't Night" and we hope that every sub- tern. ga an Y commg ac.ross Wit. em. r:~~t ~i~~~~af~?~~ts~~ri:s ~~~h~~~~u~ ~~r;be:otn:e[e~~~~h~fs~~e !ag~~yw~~ dow:it~rein~~~=nc~~~t t~: ~~~d n:itt~!~~ !~ g~!::aln~ow p~o:ec:~~ rr:~,~~t .~;: ~~ti~or;::. tl right to gamble. The Negro can copies will send in their order. Houston in writing the letter reproduced vided. more than one county lS m~olv~d. tly go to church, home or to bed. ---o-- below as he is not a subscriber to our While Boss Parr controls or heavtly m-urely he ought to be allowed to play paper and we do not know him. fluences the votes in some hal( dozen ~m~, game of his own with his own We Can't Help Jt Jf However, his letter in reply to a request coun~ies, all he_ actually needs to put h.is il~e-heartily agree with the colored We Are Not Photogenic !O:d aw:o;~~~enstisot~:~sa~~~~o:u~i~~~a~~art ;~:a~;~a~:a~::rh~~ o~eisc:a~~ina~~r t~~e:~~~ brot~er's .s~raightforward sta~ement A personal friend in New YQrk writes The name of the writer is Mr. H. W. mg ~~s controlled ballot pl.an. • Of h1s p~sthon and that of hts. race us that he does not like our picture in Bishop of Houston and his letter is ad- It ~s because of the nox10us and corrupt on ~ subject ~hich is once a~aiU b~- the "My Night" column and says that he dressed to Dr. Hugh C. Stuntz, president practices in Boss .Parr's realm that Texas f;OI.nmg a stalkm~ho~se on ~hlch poh- thinks we could do better if we tried. of Scarritt College for Christian Workers, now has one Umted States senator who tfctans .hope to nde mto o.ff1ce. Well, we can't help our looks and there Nashville, Tennessee: ~as no~ el~cted by the ~eople and who The 1mp~lse to gamble IS as deeply is no record of us ever having claimed 1s servmg m that capactty th~o~gh the implanted m the n~tur_e of the South- to be a beauty contest winner. "This will acknowledge receipt of your grace of. the Duval County magtc.'an who ~rn Negro as the mstlnc~ to breathe Having a photograph made is a nerve- letter of April 30 and also of several similar reached m an empty ballot box f1ve days Bnd any reforme~ who thm~s that by wraeking chore for us. We always argue letters received within the last year or two. after the polls had closed and pulled out ~~e c~i~n~~er~f~~;:~ta~!ig~s:~~gw~~f:g ~itt~eth:ic~~;;o~~~~h:~t a~l~t~~r~s h~~ !~~~ de~~h~~a~e:i~:llo~fr~~~;e II~~=~~ ~:dm:~~: :~~~~~d v~~t:r!o oiu~e~!~" h:~erel~~:~ ~hi: the Goddess of Chance has an abys- we won't pay him a penny. But there are " . . . opponent. rr::t!gj~o~i~~='so~~~:y o:hWJr!~ongest ;~:;s ~;:ksf~aut!~~~~~ :s~s:l~~h Td~:c:~~!~~~ pos::i:~ ~~p~:~: ~~atwih:~ s~:~~n tf~n~~CI:~ • • -o-. I • Also he has never seen the par- f t . . worthy a cause. There are other reasons Btrmlngham Housewives tlcipants of a Negro crap game in full uso~~~ w;;~~gw~g~=~·· other older women why I would hesi.tate to help Scarritt or Slogan Is "Hurry Harry ~~~~:~ ~~:y a~~ll ~~~lo~~e t~~n~sns~~~ ~~:~st;~e;d~~~e h;:un~~a:t!fu~x;~;[en;:r: ~~~ i~:::;st~t~:d;~~hScrhe::~n;.o~ :~Y s~;! Home'.' . . . ~n.n~ who directs the course of gal- momentary temptation to make the same Qutte a large s.egment of Methodtst leaders . Housew1ves m the ~labama c1ty of Btrm- Orp~~:~~~~~1~~;0fog;~~L~~~~n Pah:~~?, cr~~· second thou~ht, however. we realize wo'~l~d h::t ::e~n~~es~:~~ilege to hear you ~nn~~~~ PhO~~t~ca~rg:.~:~~zat~o~3-Hwh~~~ib,ao_~ !~r~~~;:i~~:~~~ "~~~at~~-·~a~y ~~= ~~a:h:~ma:do~: :;ea~r~~e~t·~~:'~~~;~~rk~~:. i~~a~~· m:~::c::s~on:~ra~di~ :!~~s:~~~Y:~ ~:t::~~819~2 :;o::~~~~~a7;~n:~~: 8h~h;::e are no heights o~ exaltation att~:Vt~:Yia~:~f~,e;:~:t :~~~~lyc~l~l~:o::~ ~::~. sermons and have been uplifted by or Mar:~t~l: ~~;:e•;ea:~s P;~em~=~ gr~up comparable to that attamed by a model either. '·I grew up in the Methodist Church and and has taken the wt.se pos1t10n of refusmg t~~o~~n~r~~~t%;~o~~:~~~\ ~:~f so what? ~:v:n~ovceodul~ ~~~v;n~~ifi~s~~t~~~~· ~~~~~nn~ ~~u~~~o~se~re~;Ya:S~~~~~~~mc:::i:;t:~~~~~: ~n!rea~Y~;.~tu~h;~p~~te~h: fi~~\o~! There's No Use Taking ~~· h!!~:~t !:~~liu~;~~~ ~:~e'::~v:~~s~a~:; :;::. ;~le~~e potilicai philosophy," states \tf ~it~u~~·n m~y some day att~in Unnecessary Chances hy'~;:t~!~~:e par:~c~::~~e·~o me, have been is?,=~~:~~ ;!rr~h~:~~ .. c~~~e :~:~~~s~;a8d~ ~at moral Utopia ":'he~e the de~tre A most amusing item to come out of the finest, most wonderful, most Christ- quarters m the Htllman Hotel m Btrmm~- t:a~~t~f~:n~~~nb~I~~~;c~~f~~~ht;e~ :a~:i::t~:;~~~~:~Y h:::e:s s~~:m~;k~~o: !~kee !~~:P b~~t~h~u7o~~~~::e~ha~deis~~;~;:~~ isa:P:~dtoh:~e~~n\~~~:e: ::a~a~e:~~e:sr~~ ~e:hefr 1 ~w~era~~~:n c~~~=~!{e~~ ~~~ ~~;t~~ ~:e:l':!~!r:arties and who is God's ~~:h!p~av:n~ee:th~:il~~:i~:r:d. :.vl:t ::r~~~ :~a~:~ ~~~~::~."fatth, so long as they ar• WhtlJ1. 1l comes to the So.u~hern Ne- From her interview, it would seem that from Evangelism to Socialism. They do not --o-- !'~?1 fi1t~d ~~:t i~'~1~?1~ dfc~~.~~ton, they ~~:in~~r~:k~:r~haetmhe;e:i:~rsel~si:::r s~~:r~ ~;!~:;: ~nn~:;fi:h:~h b~~:n:~s, o~~e ;~~~~~~~ rar~.e~;:~y~~~-~!!1 ~!a~s0~t0ct~~h;h~ --o-- her guest~ much as a field marshal would schools and h?spitals have been built. gone to England where he will enter Warren Puts In His ar~~~ged~;~~~:~~\~!:n~·~e always selects !:~ihed~~.~h~~~~~ ::~~:. ~~;'ol~~~fir;:a~~ ~i~f~~~ ~~i~e::~tyhi~h~ro~al~.ec~~1~: Two Cents for Socialiced her guests for small parltes from the ranks thetr busmess. They have kind words to infiltrated with Fabian Socialism at Education of Republicans and Oemocnts alike, being say for Russia and use the church to dis- the institution which dispenses It careful to see t.hat both parties are equall~ pa~age our own economic system, under wholesale; maybe, on the other hand, The very left-wing Governor Earl Warren r~presented, w1th an ambassador, a. mus1- whtch most of th~ world progress has it won't. of California addressed the equally left- Ctan and an author or two tossed m for been made. They btte the hand that feedsl---------­wing National Education Association in good measure. them. They are disloyal to the church give one thin dime to a school whosa San Francisco at its annual oonvention She als~ asser.ted. ~hat she never -gave and, I think, to the Christ they claim policy is in any way inriuenced by that recently and did what he was expected a party Without mvttlng a member of the to represent. crowd who pose as Christians but who to do Supreme Court. . . ''Maybe it is a small proportion of our are, in my opinion, disloyal both to the He put in his plug for Socialized edu· Well, ma~b~ If we were 10 ~er place leaders who hold such views, but if that church and to the Federal government. C!ation by menns of Federal aid to schools and were giVIng a p~rt~, we mtght also is so, then all of the rest keep strangely "It is possible that Scarritt is not in anr and backed up his demand Ior this policy feel that we had to tn~lte a ~ember of silent when every single Methodist preacher way influenced by such thinking, although with the usual demagogic appeal for '·equal the.Supreme Court. but 1{ we dld-rem~m- should continually lift his voice in noun- it seems improbable that any Methodist education to all children." benng the Te~as Tidelands-we would first certain terms in defense o( the church he School would be entirely Jndependent to In our opinion, he has served only one lock up the Stiver. professes to love. such subversive influence on the part of aood purpose during his long career of ---o-- "I no longer think of the Methodist a group in high church position. office-holding. He defeated Jimmy Roose- Good citizenship in this country Church as the very finest institution "If those people do have anything to do \lett for governor of California and for consists of a belief in God and rev· on earth. I feel like apologizing when I with the policy or teaching of Scarritt. that he deserves credit. erence for the Constitution of the tell any one I am a Methodist. I no longer then it is malnfestly unCail· to solicit aid As Socialistic and radical as he is, War- United States. Any political, religious hold Methodist preachers in such high from laymen without telling them the ren was preferable to Roosevelt but it is or educational leader who cannot meet esteem. truth, the whole truth and nothing but a ud day for America when the people this loyalty test should immediately "They either believe like Bishop Oxnam the truth. han to choose between Uut lesser of two be deposed. and the Methodist Federation for Social "I sincerely hope that Searritt Is still evil1. --0-- Action crowd, or they are indifferent to free and teaching the things for whtcb. Truman continues to refer to it the interest of the church, or else they Methodism haa always stood." "I see that the old flagpole still stands. as a Police Action rather than a war are so subservient to those in high position lkve your t1'oops hoi!tt the colors to its in Korea. Well, maybe it isn't a war t~at they are no longer worthy of their There is nothing further to be said Oil peak and let no enemy ever haul them and is only a Police Action but to the htgh ~alling. the subject that Mr. Bishop has fully (town" - ·Gen. Douglas MacArthur on his re- mothers of sons who lie ~here be- 'Th1s all adds up to the fact that even covered. To attempt to add to it would ... tum to Corregidor. neath a white cross, it's all the same. if I were immensely wealthy, I would not be to try to gild the lily.
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