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The Southern Conservative, Vol. 7, No. 4, April 1956
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The Southern Conservative, Vol. 7, No. 4, April 1956 - File 001. 1956-04. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 10, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/southern/item/1067/show/1058.

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(1956-04). The Southern Conservative, Vol. 7, No. 4, April 1956 - File 001. The Southern Conservative. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/southern/item/1067/show/1058

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The Southern Conservative, Vol. 7, No. 4, April 1956 - File 001, 1956-04, The Southern Conservative, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 10, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/southern/item/1067/show/1058.

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Title The Southern Conservative, Vol. 7, No. 4, April 1956
Contributor
  • Darden, Ida M.
Publisher Southern Conservative
Date April 1956
Language English
Subject
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
Place
  • Fort Worth, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 10604411
Collection
  • Houston Metropolitan Research Center
  • Ida M. Darden Collection
  • The Southern Conservative
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Houston Metropolitan Research Center.
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript THE SOUTHERN CONSERVATIVE -To Plead for a Return o·' Constitutional Government- Vol. 7 FORT WORTH. TEXAS, APRIL, 1956 No.4 Federal To Strike Authorities Unite In Effort Down Rights of the States If They Want to Walk Let'em We don't go along with the State of Alabama in arresting and convicting a Negro preacher of that State for refusing to ride the busses and inducing others to do likewise. We know nothing about the legal aspect of the Alabama court ruling but, off-hand, we think there are too many court rulings being hand­ed down these days about what people should or sho .ld not do. If the Negroes in Montgomery had rather walk than ride the busses then we say let them have at it. Walking is fir.e exercise and will probably do them good. We are almost as opposed to that ruling as we are to the S upreme Court ruling which has caused all the trouble currently tearing the South apart. Lynn Landrum, Dallas Morning News columnist expressed our sen­timents exactly when he wrote re­cently. The column does not favor ar­resting that preacher, handcuff­ing him and chaining him to a bus seat just to show him who the State of Alabama is. If he wants to walk, let him walk. And by the same token, if a white citize·1 of Alabama doesn't want to go to school with a black citizen of Alabama, the column doesn't favor arresting him and handcuffing him and chaining him to a desk just to show him who the Supreme Court of the United States is. There are some things that you can not compel by law. One of them is brother­hood. Another is equality. An­other is good will and friendli­ness between two different races. Reporter Scares Wits Out of Reading Public Not Since Orson Welles' broad­cast some years ago in which he told of an imaginary invasion from Mars have many good Americans experienced such chilling fright as that which froze their spines on April 3rd on reading a front-page news story by one Ruth Montgom­ery, International News Sf'rvice reporter in Washington. On that date, Miss Montgomery told her readers that the President was seriously considering setting up a new Cabinet post and nam- (ro,lHnued On Page 4) General's Horse Gets Clean Bill of Health One of the burning questions of the past fourteen years has con­cerned the whereabouts of General George Marshall on that Black Sunday of 1941 when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor, blowing up 86 vessels of the United States Pa­cific Fleet conveniently lined up like sitting ducks and killing over 31000 American service men. There has been much specula­tion on the subject in the interven­ing years and the consensus of opinion was that the General who couldn't be found by those who searched high and low for him throughout the day, was riding his horse in Rock Creek Park in Wash­inglon. This was never officially con­firmed or denied as General Mar­shall wouldn't talk and the horse couldn't. Recently, we were invited by those who conduct the Congress of Freedom in various cities through­out the country each year, to sit in on their three day session at Dallos. Although we heard interesting, earnest and profound discussions on many subjects of life and death concern to the American people at this great meeting of patriots, one bit of information gleaned ~rom a speaker more than repaid us for the time spent there Major George Racey Jordan, one of the greatest patriots of this or any other age, told his listeners where General Marshall was on that fatal December day. He was, the major said. at the Russian Embassy in ·washington talking the situatior: over :"ith Maxim Litvinov, who had arnved in the Capital at ten o'clock that morning. from Russia. Well. at long last, that deep. dark mystery is cleared up and General Marshall's horse is finally exonerated from any participation in the events of that historic day. From a subscriber in Philadel­phia: ur think you Southerners will hove sweet revenge on hypo­. fhticat Northc1·n do-gooders . As You know the ADA demagoques got the Negroes to come up here in droves for thei1· votes and even some of the politicians are now getting scm·ed ... There are many murders which never get into the papers ... None of us, including the good colm·ed people. would dare wall.: the .'itreets at night. Talk about the j11ngle.1•• Only those whose respect for the Constitution has been deadened through a quarter century of brain-washing by the nation's leaders, will fail to react with amazement and fury at unified efforts of the Executive, Judicial and Legis­lative departments of government to n11llify that document and set up a Federal Despotism in Washington. In a brazen attempt to intimidate the people of the South and force servile compliance with Marxist-inspired Court decrees, the White House, the Departm ~ nt of Justice, the Supreme Court and certain members of the Congress are collaborating to abolish the American jury system, invalidate the Bill of Rights and cancel out the last vestige of Constitutional au­thority of the States to govern their own internal affairs. On the 9th of April, 1865, the torn and battered remnants of the troops of General Robert E. Lee laid dow1~ their arms at Appomattox and the weary, maimed and despondent v1ctims of a Lost Cause went back to rebuild their ruined homes, replant their devastated [ield~; and restore their wrecked economy. During the following years of Reconstruction , the destitute citizens of Dixie were subjected to every form of humHiation, degradation and mental torture which the bestial brain of the degenerate Th~ddeus Stevens and his horde of lewd and dissolute Carpet Baggers could devise against a proud but helpless and defeated people. Whether through accident or sadistic intent we wouldn 't know but political Carpet Baggers of the North selected this same tragic date, ninety one years later, to aim another blast at the South intended to once again bring the people of Dixie to heel. On April 9th, 1956, the Attorney General in Washington came bear­ing to Congress a request from the President of the United States that legislation be passed by that body nullifying the sixth amendment to the Constitution which guarantees to all Americans the right of Trial by Jury in these words: "In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial by an impartial jury of the State and the district wherein the crime shall have been committed, which district shall have been previously ascertained by law, and to be informed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses against him; to have compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor and to have the assistance of counsel for his de­fense." In place of this Constitutional guarantee of the right of Trial by Jury which Americans have enjoyed for one hundred and sixty-five years, the President requested, through his Attorney General, that the Congress set up a Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice where a citizen could be dragged from his own State and hauled into Washington to be tried in secret by political appointees of the President who would serve as jury, prosecutor and judge. Since this proposal, along with the Supreme Court decision on segregation in May, 1954, resulted partly from the frantic and desperate contest between so-called Republicans and so-called Democrats for the colored vote, and partly from demands from the Kremlin concerning integration in the South, it is clear that no American citizens would be hauled before this political tribunal except those from the Southern States where very little cordiality has been shown to proposals for wrecking the Constitution in the interest of corraling minority group votes or in order to comply with Soviet demands. The Administration further requested authority for the Attorney General to bring action in the Courts on behalf of any aggrieved person and asked Congress to throw out the present requirement that admiois­trative and judicial remedies in the States must be exhausted before a Civil Rights case can be taken to Federal Court. By such proposed pro­cedure a part of the Fifth amendment which provides that no person shall be held to answer for a crime except on indictment by a Grand (Continued on Page 2) M ill ion s of A m e r i c a n s T h i n k It-T h e S o u the r n C o n s e r vat i v e S a v s It THE SOUTHERN CONSERVATIVE Apdl, 19!6 Why Have So Many Americans Slick Paper Edition of Daily Turned Red in Their Views? Worker Blasts National Review Many Americans must be appalled, as we art', at the hundreds of thous­ands o! Americans representing every walk of lile and engaged in every phase ot activity and whose behavior pattt'rn follows what is plainly trea­son to the United States and its insti­tutions. Who are these subversives, where did they come !rom and why have they turned against their own country and transferred their loyalty to the Soviet Republic, the most degenerate and barbaric country on earth, is a constant query directed to us and, un­doubtedly to all others who, each in his own limited way, tries to warn of the rising tide of treason which is en­gulfing the United States. We do not of course, know the answer and neither does anybody else but much enlightenment may be had concerning the infiltration of the aver­age American's mind with Communist ideals when we consider the undis­puted and undeniable fact that top leaders of the American government threw in with Soviet plotters many years ago and aided them •vith plans and materials lor the overthrow of the American government. A refresher course on treason against this country may be had by turning back to the testimony of Ma­jor George Racey Jordon, retired, whlch was broadcast to millions of listeners by Fulton Lewis, Jr., sever­al years ago but which shduld be re~ vived and reviewed over and over again and kept alive in the memories ot those who are constantly bewilder­ed by the inconcelveable attitude of our national leaders toward the Krem­lin. Major Jordan was lend - lease expediter during World War II and was stationed at Great Falls Montana, through which passed materials and supplies to Russia, via Alaska and Si­beria, which enabled them to keep pace with, it not surpass, this coun­try in construction of the atomic bomb. (The purpose of building the atomic bomb in the first place was to pl'otect us against Russia and, all the while, we were helping them to build bombs to protect themselves against us. Wh:~.t vision, what patriotism and what statesmanship! ! ! ) Robert J. Ryan, one of Dean Acheson's close buddies when Acheson, instead of Du.Ues, was heading our one-world State De­partment, said to Acheson on the latter's departure as head of that agency: '·Mr. Secretary, the em­ployees of the Department and the Foreign Service a1·e very proud of yow· many outstanding achieve­ments. Your high sense of duty, your statesmanship, your courage, your patience and your fortitude have been an inspiration to all of us. You, sir, are a tnte public serv· ant .•. " Ryan is not only still with t11e State Department but has been promoted and given more important assignments by the present administration. (See pages A-2158 Congressional Record, March 8, 19_56_! ____ We learn more every day about the wonderful uses to which the American taxpayers' money is be­ing put when it gets to its destina­tion in foreign countries. For in­stance a very useful expenditure was 'made with the building ,·e­cently of a si:r-lane highway from. Lisbon, Portugal, to a nice plu..sh gambling joint fifteen miles out of town. Americans should be very grateful that they are allowed to funlish the money for such hu­manitarian projects as this. Ju.st think what it will do to "stave off Communi.!tn'' in that area! In the course of his duties at Great Falls, Major Jordan was alarmed when he found such Items as 500 pounds of black uranium oxide, 500 pounds of uranium and heavy water, components of the bomb being shipped to Russia in the face of a security or­der forbidding all movements of such materials. When he protested to su­periors, the big-headed and Soviet­loving Harry Hopkins who wa:; acting as a sort of unofficial Kremlin spon­sor in the White House, promptly ordered that this material be sent to Russia without interference. According to Major Jordan, we not only supplied the material to the So­viets to make atomic bombs as poten­tial weapons against t•s, but in order to make sure that they knew how to drop it, we sent a delegation over there with the Norden bombsig7:-t who reached Moscow in 1944 and gave the Russians courses of instruction so that their flyers might be sure of hitting their targets when the time came to use it. We sent $25,000,000 worth of pipe to the Russians along about the same time wben this material for develop­Ing the bomb was in short supply here. We also sent them seventeen station­ary and three hydro-electric plants costing $263,289,000 and 254,923 tons of copper, although this material was in such short supply here that silver from the treasury vaults was being substituted. When a Washington offi­cial protested, the Rasputin of the New Deal Court, Harry Hopkins, again overruled him. $25,000,000 worth of electrical equipment was al­so rushed to Moscow, in utter defiance of the laws deaHng with the security of this country. Under the lend-lease law, the ship­ment of material to Russia at that time was left to the discretion of the president but Harry Hopkins seems to have been acting as president and slipped in this material for the pur­pose of specdlng up construction of atomic bombs; not that Roosevelt would have cared if he had known it. AU this and so much more is told in Major Jordan's Diary that no American can afford to remain in ignorance of the treasonable acts which went on during the early For­ties with the fuH sanction of authori­ties in our own government. Laugh of the ·month: A Negro member of the NAACP, in a let­ter to a Dallas paper, seeks to prove the high purpose and integ­rity of his 01·ganization by pointing out that such "persons of high standing and character" as Elea­nor Roosevelt and Bishop Oxnam belong to it. Ye gods! "The Federal Government did not create the States of this Re­public. The States created the Fed­eral Government. The creation should not supersede the creator. For if the States lost their mean­ing, our entire system of govern­ment loses its meaning and the next step is the rise of the central­ized national state, in which the seeds of autocracy can take root and grow!' - Dwight D. Eisen­hower in a speech at Des Moines, Iowa during the 1952 Presidential campaign. Why should the nationl'l admin­istr~ tion get almost $5,000,000,000 to give to other countries to h~lp them uto stave off Communi.ml'' and, at the same time, refuse to give Committees of the American Congress information to help them expose Communist infiltration and thereby "stave off Communism" in thi.! country? Does that make Jense? Under the editorship oi the learned and brilliant .dudent of American politics, William F. Buckley, Jr., the circulation of National Review the only journal of conservatism in its field, has reached almost eighteen thousand since its initial appearance last November. This is far short of U1e number nec­essary, however, to sustain a publica­tion ot this type and if fifty thou­sand Americans are not willing to exchange seven dollars a year for fifty-two copies of a publication which is of, by and for Americans, they deserve what is happening to them, but fast. National Review, as might be ex­pected, is not exactly popular with liberal, left-wing magazines who have practically had the field to themselves since 1933 when the organized at­tempt to Socialize the United States got off to a good start with the writ­ing profession and the book-publish­ing industry pretty solidly lined up in favor of this policy, and worse. Naturally, these pink publications do not put out the red carpet for any newcomers in the field except those ot their own ilk. Harper's, the slick paper edition of the Daily Worker and the egghead's bible, was especial­ly bitter in its blast at· the National Review which, in the view of well­balanced and thoughtful Americans is about as high a compliment as could be paid to Mr. Buckley and his splendid publication. We know it is customary for people with money to sit on their hands when asked to write a check for any good movement designed to attempt to halt the fast pace of national and international Socialism, but we re­spectfully suggest to such Americans It is very strange, indeed, that newspapers and do-gooders who are blasting Southerners for try .. ing peacefully to combat integra .. tion and thereby prevent blood· shed in the South, never had one word to say against the NAACP, the Urban League, the ADA or any other pro-Red group who worked for years to get the former Supreme Court decisions reversed. What's so bad about decent white and colored people now wishing to have this latest one reversed? We are too poor to offer any cash reward but we will give a year's free subscription to anyone who can tell us when the United States ceased to be a Republic and became a uDemocracy," and through which amendment to the Constitution or other legal act this change took place. Of course the catch to this offer is that all good Americans know that it is not a "Democracy" but a Republic and since only Reds refer to it as a ~<Democracy " they would not care to read a publication devoted sole· ly to Americanism 4! is the South· ern Conse1·vative. So, naturally, we will have no takers on this offer, that it might be profitable to them to support effective and sincere ges­tures toward the right, while they are still free to do so. The address of the National Review is 211 East 37th Street, New York 16, N.Y. Federal Authorities Unite (Continued From Page 1) Jury, nor deprived of due process of law, would be nullified and the Federal government permitted to take direct action in matters involving civil offenses. In pr~ctical applic~ti.on, .a Negro woman could charge that a white man had VIOlate~ her Civil R1~hts ~y refusing to serve ~er a meal in his cafe. F~eral officers could seize him, handcuff him and whisk him off to Washmgton. wh~re he would be tried, convicted and sentenced by me~bers ?f mmon~y group~ who would, without doubt, heavily pre­dommat~ m Executive appomtmen.ts to such a Civil Rights Division as the Pre~Ident has requested. In this manner, the Constitutional Rights of a wh1te man would be vacated in deference to the Civil Rights of a Negro woma~ an.d due proc~~ of law would have been by-passed in this s~ort-cut to JUStice as admmtstered by the picked personnel of a par~ tisan political Court. ~iding the Executi':'e Department in the campaign to strike down the rights of the Sovereign States during this 9lst Anniversary month of the South'~ defeat, ~ere several rulings by the Supreme Court, the most astoundmg of which was that which voided the Sedition laws of forty-.two S~ates and which, indirectly, served as an invitation to alien enemies trymg to overthrow the American government, to have at it. Citing the Smith Act as evidence that the Federal government meant to preempt the ~nti-sedition field, the Court apparently had wi~~~c~~?n t~o~~~~dt~~t8l~;~~. ~c: ~:it~s t:r~:0{g~Q~i~o~ia~~~3i~~t~! 18 of the U. S. Code and Section 3231 of that title provides that "Noth- ~~; ~0~~~~ ~:~~h~h:~~.:r~tS~~t~ ~~e~~~~ 1o:~~t~~~e~1.~' j~risdiction of any ~\!~~;fi~~1:n%~·~~[.s~~~;~~Y~~g t~~eECf!~~ ~a~~fst~~e ~~~t~~nMe~ ~tSt~~ehC~~~:;y~~~ect ~ir::i~a~~~e,u~~~~]kat~~:~eaf~~~;~~tjr:~~fi~t~~d even our present Supreme Court Justices can grasp it. Legislative measures to carry out the President's request for this ~x~~b:~:~~n~~;t~~;~~r~t~~~~r~~~~~oo~ier~~~r:~\~n ,:Jli~~eb~[~~~~ ~ous to ~ake mmce'11ea~ .out of States Rights and who are poised like ~~tf:~lling vultures Waiting to pounce on the carcass of a dead Consti~ Apri~ 1956 THI SOUTHERN CONSERVAT IV& Page l Congress of Freedom Holds A Successful Session at Dallas It's Long Past Time for Congress Senator Charges Colleagues With Hypocritical Behavior In an editorial discussion of the Declaration of Constitutional prin­ciples signed by one h undred mem­bers of Congress in regard to the Supreme Court r uling on segre- 1;!~~~, 2~es':;::kpa~~~~~0~e~: ocratic Leader Lyndon Johnson explained to all who would listen to him in the privacy of the Sen­ate Cloakroom, the 'Declaration' was intended just for 'home con­sumption'. The Southern congress­man felt they had to issue some kind of statement criticizing the Court because so many of them were being challenged in this year's primaries by all-out 'white supremists'". It is difficult to believe that a member of the Senate from Texas would be so contemptuous of the overwhelming sentiment in his own State, to say nothing of the matter of ethics and courtesy to his colleagues, as to thus publicly challenge their integrity. Senator Johnson, no doubt, was unconsciously attributing to others the motives known to often under­lie his own political behavior and it is perhaps hard for him to under­stand that elected representatives sometimes discharge their respon­sibilities in keeping with their oath of office. He has probably never been a participant in any political action based on a sincere desire to serve his state and h is constituents, rath­er than ad vancing his own in ter­ests, and possibly &hould be for­given for his inability to evaluate the motives of those who some­times perform otherwise. Sitting Sam and Landslide Lynd011 For a man who has been away f rom the State for so long that the memory of man runneth not to ~he contrary, Sam Rayburn is takmg a lot of interest in who sha ll, and shall not, r epresent Texas at the Chicago convent ion No one has ever h eard him say until yet what he thinks about. seg­regatiOn which is th~ hott~st 1ssue the Chicago convenhon w1ll have to face and since he doesn't know his own mind on the subject , how does he know what the people of Texas intend to do in regard to the matter at Chicago and who they want to represent them there? The venerable Speaker bas held down a seat in the House of Rep­resentatives w long that he prob­ably figures he ha:; acquired "'squatters rights" in the joint and maybe he has, but if he would come back to Texas occasionally he would find that voting box 13 in Duval County, which sometimes sways a senatorial election, is not the jeciding factor in naming the man to head Tex~s· delegation to Chicd_g;) Offici"ls of the NAACP claim that out of 42 cases caT1'ied to the Supreme Court by that ou-tfit, 40 of them got a favorable decision. The Court must be slipping! We thought the score was one hun­dred per cent. To Curb Criminality of Labor Unions Texas had the honor of entertaining the Congress of Freedom which met this year at the Adolphus Hotel at Dallas on April 4th tor a tour-day session. As usual, the Congress was address­ed by many outstanding speakers who are highly regarded as authori­ties in their respective fields. Includ­ed this year was Dr. Felix Wittmer, lecturer, author, educator, well versed in matten relating to immigration; Major George Racey Jordan who be­came nationally known through his Diaries which disclosed the ship­ment of forbidden items to Russia during World War U; Stephanie Wil­liams of Burbank, California, Presi­dent American Public Relations Forum and authority on mental health bills; Dr. F. A. Harper of Foundation !or Economic Education; Willis E. Stone, author of proposed 23rd Amendment to take govern­ment out o( competition with private industry; Phil Tyrrell of the Amer­icanism Committee niinois American Legion; J essica Payne, author, edu­cator and lecturer; Dr. Nicholas Ny­aradi, former Minister of Finance of Hungary and author of "My Ring­side Seat at Moscow"; Congressman Frank T. Bow of Ohio who leads fight in Congress to canc~l Status of Forces agreements; Andrae Nord­skog, author, educator and lecturer; Harry T. Everingham who heads "We, the People" organization of Chicago; Carlton A. Barrett, Pennsyl­vania American Legion official and many others. Mrs. Willard Hedrick of Houston was the convention chairman and was largely responsible for the in­teresting sessions, including sym­posiums on various subjects, which culminated in a Freedom Banquet ou April 7th at the rool Garden ol Ho­tel Adolphus. Dan Smoot o! Dallas made the address of welcome to the delegates and Mary Cain of Mississip­p i was toastmistress at the banquet. Mr. George Thomas ot Omaha, Ne­braska, is Chairman of the Congress. We Think Alger Hiss Should Address Princeton Students There is a storm of protest all over the country against Alger Hiss being allowed to address Princeton students on April 26. Even Hiss' comrades in Ameri­cans for Democratic Action could­n't stomach the idea of him being invited to address the Swarthmore Chapter of ADA and insisted on cancelling his date with Swarth­more College. They didn't object to Hiss, of course, but didn't like the adverse political reaction the event would create. But Dr. Harold W. Dobbs, the Princeton President, said that he thought it would be unwise to cancel the invitation extended the man who gave our secrets to Rus­sia, by a Princeton group of stu­dents. We see nothing amiss in Hiss talking to students who have been indoctrinated with the same ideol­ogy wh;ch Hiss accepted early in life. We predict he will be cheered to the echo by the college students who hear him and that he will feel right at home. Also, since the type of govern­ment in which Hiss believes is be­ing urged on us at this time by high authorities, perhaps it is jn::;t as well that Hiss be given full rein. Possibly the d isgraceful per· formance wiJI wake up some mil­lions of Americans who a re dead from the neck up. Maybe they will finally realize not only that it can happen here, but that it IS hap­pening h ere. Where the Blame Belongs for The Attack On Negro Crooner The attack on the Hollywood Negro crooner in Birmingham, Ala­bama, recently during a performance in that city, was very unfortunate, as well as cowardly. Aside from the criminality of the act, it provides the vicious and organized enemies of the South ammunition for the crusade being carried on to humiliate and degrade all Southerners in every imagin· able way. Those making the attack on the Negro do not represent the people of Alabama and other Southern States who are taking every legal action open to them to thwart the Communist-inspired effort to mix the races in public schools, swimming pools, golf courses and churches with a view to ultimate mongreli.zation. Acts of violence by hot-headed mobs have no place in the orderly program of resistance by law-abiding and responsible men and women in the Southern States. The blame cannot be placed entirely on those making the attack. It goes back further than that. There is no doubt that the appearance of the Negro in tension­ridden Alabama at this time was bad judgment on someone's part, if, indeed, it was not planned purposely to provoke violence to further dis­credit the good Americans who are fighting integration and who will continue to do so until the fight is won. It was bad judgment on the part of the Birmingham officials of the Mu nicipal aud itorium in booking the Negro singer for a performance there and above all, it was a reflection on the common sense of the four thousand persons who bought t ickets to hear him. They, also, are not representative of high class Alabama citizenship. Those who approve, and those who oppose segregation should make no mistake about it - acts of violence are going to occur with greater frequency until the matter of segregation is settled and settled right and the people of the South, both black and white, are permitted to con­tinue a way of life which enabled them to live together in friendship and mutual respect until a Marxist-dominated Supreme Court disrupted this peaceful design for living by its Black Monday segregation ruling:. In the meantime, those who deliberately bring about a situation which is conducive to acts of violence, as in the case of the Birmingham concert, are doing a disservice to both races. Most Americans have listened with just half an ear when such outstand­ing writers and commentators as Westbrook Pegler, Fulton Lewis, Jr., Victor Riesel and others have tried to picture to them the indcstribably corrupt behavior of the leaders of Labor Unions who have become rich and powerful at the expense o( the honest men and women who com· prise the vast membership of the unions. As in the case of government, edu­cational, religious and other organ­ized activities in this country, the Unions are rotten at the top and it is the leadership which hn.s caused the union movement to become a cancerous growth on the nation's The cowardly attack by the beast in human form on Victor Riesel for exposing graft and corruption in the New York labor field is, or should be, convincing proof of the danger of govemment coddling o( the crimi­nal labor leaders who have come to believe that their minions are above the reach of the law and that any crime is justified so long as it achieves their goal of inspiring fear of its power to destroy. Mr. Riesel is paying a horrible price for his patriotic interest in his country's welfare and surely there is enough manhood among the na· tion's lawmakers to take the step now U1at they should have taken years ago when top criminals of labor Unions first started extorting money f1·om the workers to build up th eir powerful and corrupt po­litical machine, and pass legislation making unions amenable to the law of the land the same c.s any other group. Certainly there is no do ubt that the gangster who attacked Mr. Riesel and possibly blindM him for life was acti.1g under orders. Congressman Worries About The Nation's Gold Supply We never reproduce material from any other publication, ?f course, without giving full credit but in the case of the following, we can't. Some one sent it to us cli p· ped from a newspaper without in­dicating what newspaper it was. We don't even know who sent it to us but we likf"d it so well we decided to publish it and risk be­ing accused of "swiping" it: A special House committee will be named to count thP. gold at Ft. Knox, if Representative Kearns of Pennsylvania has his way. 'l'he Daughters of the Am­erican Revolution also want to be reassured that the approxi­mately 12-}2 billion do 11 a r s worth of government gold is safe in its Kentu"ky hiding place. Kearns, a Republican, says that such an inspection is c very important now that the Demo· crats are going out of office." While we seem to detect a some­what partisan note in this se1Hi· ment, it may be that Kearns just happens to be a cautious fellow who has heard that .it pays to count the silverware if you have any doubts at all about the folks who have had their hands on it lately. Page 4 The Southern Conservative A MONTHLY PUBLICATION OF EDITORIAL OPINION WITH NATIONAL CIRCULATION IDA M. DARDEN, EdHor Editorial Offices Flatiron Building Fort Worth, Texas Phone EO 2-2089 Price $5.00 Per Year IEvuy p1id 1Ub1crib.r i1 tnfitl•d to on• fru1ubtcription tob• ~tnffo1nypenon of hh chooting.) Sent without cod to member1 of Congreu, rntmben of State ltgi1lature1, Govtrnou, tndotherpublicofficitls. theA w~:J'~~~ rf~~k~: a~a:a;l~\ow~~~ against the dorm. THE TENTH AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES, ThtpowennotdelagatedtofhtUnited St1f11 by fht Constitution, nor prohibited byittotheStateltreraservedtothe Sht11 rtapedivtly, or to the paoplt. We Offer to Step in and Ease Wounded Feelings Following the claim of Senator Francis Case o! South Dakota that a lobbyist representing Mr. Howard Keck of the Superior Oil Company of California had o!fered him a "b,·ibe" of $2500.00 to support the Fullbright Gas bill, some other poli­tician out in Nebraska broke out in the press. He said he had accepted a big check Irom the same company but was now returning it. Virtue seemed to be breaking out all over the pl3ce and nobody would touch those big cllecks with a len toot pole. l\lcantime we wrote the President of the Superior Oil Company as fol­lows: From recent press reports, it seems you have been having a little dif!iculty in finding takers for some checks you would like to give away. I , too, have been having trouble I ut it is or a somewhat different nature. I have been trying to find somebody with checks to give away, so it occurs to me that if we could get together, we could make an arrangement that should be mutually satisfactory. ''1 won't even insist on the amount being $2500 and will settle for any nmount you might wish to contribute to a hard-hitting, unregenerate Sou­thern(' r who, lor more than six years, has been trying to verbally bash in the brains of the type of lawmaker i:~pt:~c t~h~~~;~ ;:~th fr:J~lvi;egga:~: in~ it as a 'bribe'. I will accept it as u bl<'S!';ing. After all, senators are a dime a dozen but good American patriots with an understanding of the functions and limitations of the American government and the cour- :;~ ~~n~r~~~t~r!h~o~o~~:~;s il~ose~~ found lying around loose''. H the gentleman does not respond, we will know he has become so browbeaten by the Case affair, and the return of his check by the Ne- ~~~~t~~c n~a~;·~a~;:; ~~f;~!ll P~~~~~bl~ quarter In the col1eelion plate on Sunday. The day is never gloomy if there·s sunshine in the heart - the sunshine of the Confidence tl'hich tells you that if you fight hard enough, and long enough, uou yet can save America, your bles~ed America! - Hal.sey Mc­Govern, ·washington, D.C. THE SOUTHER N CONS ERVA TIV E April, 1956 Educational Group Defends Right of Irving School Head Takes Revenge On Loyal Teachers Communists to Teach in American Schools The story of the l<vh1g- School squabble is fairly well known to Those who are inclined to doubt most Americans 2'" it was given that Communist influence in quite a lot of publicity some time ago Congenial Souls Meet on American schools and universities ~~~}.perhaps very few know the se· "India'S Coral Strands" ~~a1~:ed 5~~o~~se3~h~s ar:~~~~:~;~ su~~r~~~e~~a~~~d 0;'~~~ ~~~~::f~-~~~~ Walter Reuther is reported in on the subject, are asked to con- system of this small Texas city, named i~~~~r:i~~tt~oh~~~;!~~r: ~i~~~~f; sider the action of the American ~he:r:d, ;-;:s r~:::n:Y ~:~~c~c~~;ebos~f~ ed Comrade Nehru lavishly, call- Association of University profes- ficient to board members. ing him "truly one of the great sors at a recent meeting. Immediately a large group of pink statesmen of the world." In order According to press dispatches, ~eu3t~h~~\h~i~~~~~~~~nfn ~~:~: ra::oannaJ ~~1:t,P~~~ia~~s t~i1~1Jr~:or~~=~~~; this organization went on record as ;~~~~~~~~n:~:e~i~~sa ~~ri~ee i~e;~;;;s~ that Reuther was educated in Mos- condemning the dismissal of Com- against Beard's discharge like so cow, and, ideologically, has been munists from college faculties and many labor union goon$ rather than ~~:~:,il~~he~~eis s;0~i~t110~:~h dif~~: ~~of~~.~ di~;~;~~gda~~~gse ::~;rft::: ~~ep:e;~i:!!T:~. of a lofty and dignl-ence in the doctrine he propounds Another group of teachers, how­and that of Moscow to be notice- and invoke the fifth amendment ever, recognizing that their loyalty as able. tnot.stavCoOild1necteltlti0nl1gS. of their Commu- r~!~ i~~ft~f;~~ ~~dtl~ots~~o~~yw:~e:: He is also quoted as having told school politician, remained on duty ~~~vfe~f1~~f /~!~eina~ }~~~!~"i The American Association of ~~o:~i~h~f h~~e J~~~~d a~~t.insults of would support with all my might University Professors is not a fly- At that time we said editorially of the establishment of nationalized by-night organization hast i 1 Y these Joyal teachers: "The Irving industries," but he was quick to thrown up by disgruntled radicals teachers who st<~yed on their jobs and add that in the United States "he in the teaching profession. It is a refused to strike like stevedores on would not change the pattern of top-ranking educational group to the waterfront, deserve the com­the economy." Like fun, he would- which most of the educators in mendation o! every thoughtful parent n't! Every act of his official career the higher brackets of learning be- everywhere for trying to maintain the as a labor racketeer has been shap- }~~l~e~1~de lr~ ~~;~{~=~ :d~~~~~~~~ :~1~~~~ ~~tt~~ ~~-h~~e:;~e=:~~r~h:ea;. ed to the end of changing the pat- formed like Americans and put the tern of our national economy, both circles. welfare of the pupils above the 'rule ~{ri~e~ cf~r u t~! ~~;p~s~e~oJ:;~~~~~ ly ~~1~ei~::.::~:::sl~d~~~a~i~~c~~~ ~~~~~~~r~~~icy or national profes!ional ~~lf:~:a~; t~nedh~~rle~;~ed:~~~; ~;!t!~~~eJ~~s~~t~~ir:nn;u~~st:n~~r~~i Be~r~~lo~~ ti~~:!t~~riheo?~'~~~~~l~~ o( honest workers to get an inter- American students and in defense tion and maneuvering which was ¥!o~~~~~o~~~-~~s!d!:itst~=in:~~~~ ~i;~fi~ ~r:;:nt~~~n~~;:,~e:~s;'~f~ ~~~:~~~!~~c:::~ b~~!~~::;~i~~ s~== we mean.) filiation. placed them with his partisans. Beard, It is too bad that we couldn't of course, was re-instated. give Reuther to India on a sort of What further assurance do those When the time f.or renewal of con-lend- lease basis. It would be a good who say " it can't happen here" tracts with teachers rolled around re.­way to get even with that old horse want to convince them that it is cently, praclical1y an the teachers th_ie_f;,,_N_eh_r_u. ______h_ a:p....p:_e,_1ing;_h_er_e_____ :'nhdo m:~~tot'~h~!~i~h~v~~~na~~~~n~~ duty during the strike were told that 'The Mills of the State Department Grind th~~eco~~:r~\' ~vc~~~~ "~a~·~ ,.~·;:.:ee~ Steadily and Long but the Grist Is Small' ~~~u:~s:;~~e!t~;e~:~~ee~~~~o~~n~o ~~~ policy of rewarding disloyalty and Not only for its factual value but because a common-sense, down­to- earth assertion by a New Deal internationalist is as rare as a snow­storm in Miami, we reproduce a statement made by Senator Paul Doug­las of Illinois in 1952 in reference to that blundering, fumbling agency of the Federal government known -as the State Department: ''While the importance of the State Department has increased there is every evidence that the personnel has been expanded at a much greater rate than is necessary. When the Department is given a problem to solve or a program to administer, such as the Voice of America and the Point 4 Program, the very first step seems to be the assembling of a huge planning and administrative staff. The Department has a touching faith that, the more men and women it hires, the more readily can a problem be solved. It believes in intellectual formations in depth. "In actual administrative life, however, excessive numbers do not have so beneficent an effect. Instead, they delay work and make it more difficult, for, in order to develop plans the subordinates have to clear matters with one another. Then they must start their projects upward through the administrative hierachy. At each level there must be consultations, discussion and modification. By this system of horizontal, vertical and traverse clearance and discus­sion, much time and effort are consumed. "The mills of the Department grind steadily and long but the actual grist is very small. The chief energies of the large staff are consumed communicating with one another. A much smaller staff would not be so administratively mUsclebound. It could accomplish much more in much less time and at much less expense." Believing in praise where praise is due, we commend highly the Senator from Illinois for this forthright discussion of an unwholesome situation. We didn't know the old boy had it in him and we hope that this facet of his character comes to the fore more often, for in honest admissions like this he can render far more valuable service to his con­stituents than through the demagogic proposals he so often makes. The Council on Foreign Rela­tions. which will one day be far better known than it is today, is using the Rockefeller- endowed Columbia University to train stu­dents in a international administra­tion" against the time wl1en the Uniteo States is taken 1nto World Govenlment. Reporter Scares Wits (Continued From Page 1) ing his brother, Milton Eiseolhow­er, to head it. in;i~~~t~~:t ~aasteb;e~~~~7J' :~~~t the matter and it is the cousensus of O}Jinion that the whole thing was either a figment o( the reporter's imc1gination or a delayed April Fool 's joke. penalizing loyalty, a custom, unfor­tunately, that is also prevalent in Washington. Statement That Is Sound Sensible and to the Point , One of the simplest and sanest statements on segregation which has yet been made was, in our opinion, that contained in a letter from a Texan, Lloyd S. Riddle of Dallas to a newspaper there: ''Your editorial of April 2, urg· ing moderation regarding the en­forcement of the infamous U.S. Su­preme Court attempted legislation is not worthy of your great news­paper. "The ultimate result or a knife at your throat or slow poison is the same, and neither is conducive to moderate acceptance by any lucid person. "What you fail to point out is that under the Constitution the states have a right to segregate, and that the people of the South have the law on their side and that they will not gamble the future of their children either gradually or suddenly." Com.mtmists who formerly held high positions with the Soviet gov· ernment and later fled to the Unit.ed States testified ":Jefore a Congressional committee that the United Nations is a hot-bed of Communist .')pies. Many Ameri­cans already knew it but there still will be those who do not be­lieve it. even though it is sworn to by former pm·ticipants in the Soviet spy ritlg. 56 •ol to ng •ol ed rd If-an 11- .. to ap .ty of of ng nd ,on_ ~n t he ap ~r­he 1le al of Ia- , .. ~:: rd, ~rs <ed ilat ed. i~~ the nd or­in :st !ch our ter of at ihe to cid is ;he .te, Jth 1at of eld ov­• he a the !~~ ~re be­) rn the April, 195b THE SOUTHERN CON S ER VA TI VE Page 5 New Judicial Slogan: 'Always School Official Vows to Ask for Dismissal Business Men Fed GivetheCommunistsABreak' Of NEA Defense Commission Members Up On 'Form Letters' Through its fantastic and insane ruling in which it threw out the conviction of Communist leader, Steve Nelson, who had been sent­enced to a penitentiary term of twenty years by a Pennsylvania Court, the Supreme Court was able to kill two birds with one stone. Through this ruling, it not only advanced another step in its deter ­mination to abolish the rights of States but it was also able to res­cue a Commu nist from a long peni­tentiary term. The decision which held that the Sedition laws of i2 states were in­valid and that only the Federal government had jurisdiction in such matters, p ut the judges in the position of a small child "sassing" its p ar ents. The Federal government didn't create the States-the States cre­ated the Federal government a nd like a huge Frankenst ein, that same Feder al government would rise up and destroy its creator. The r uling was so farcical that even four of its own judge s gagged on it and put in r rlissent, something that has seldom happen­ed since Warren was politically re­warded by appointment as Chief J ustice. 'Censure' Chairman Favors Opening Doors to Reds More than one hundred organi­zations are in Washington now plugging for the pass.ge of the Watkins Resolution of the Senate which would totally destroy the McCarran-W a lter Immigration law, as far as its features to pro­tect the safety and security of the United States are roncerned. Enemy agents have been secr et­ly promoting a movement for years to invalidate this security legislation and the current inte~se activity is strictly Communist-m­spired in the view of Washington observers. The Watkins Resolution would eliminate the section which pro­vides that all Emigrants to this country must be finger-printed on arrival. This was intended not only to keep Conununists out but to detect international criminals who commit crimes in other countries and escape to the United States. The Watkins Resolution also de­mands that the u nused quota of Emigrants from European Co~n­tries be given to Asiatic countnes which means Communists would come hu·e in droves. Senator Arthur Watkins. spon­sor of the Resolution is from Utah and was Chairman of the Senate Committee which ""ensured" Sen­ator Joseph R. McCarthy when his investigation into Communis.m was believed to be on the verge of turn-ing up some big names. , Any American who does not be­lieve in opening up th is country to an alien horde bent on over­throwing the goVernment had ~et­ter let their tw1• Senutors unaer­stand il' no unc1"rta in tP.rms that th is must not h app\:.n a.1d that the Watkins Resolution must be de­feated. Better wi:·~ or cull them for it 'vill be mo11e::V well spent if the assault 011 Olll' nation,ll security by means of the Watkins Resolu­tion is halted We do not believe it is true as is constantly 1·umored t h ~ t there is a movement on to bmld an anne:-c of the White House down in Augusta, Georgia. A public school official with the manhood and decency to protest the inclusion of slimy, obscene filthy books in the public school libraries of several California towns has laid down the challenge to National Education Association authorities in Washington who approved and commended Marin County school heads for their "courage" in refusing to remove th is lewd material from school library shelves. This official who deserves the heartfelt gratitude of every parent in the United States, is E. J. Hummel, Deputy Superintendent of the Beverly Hills, California, Public School System, who addressed this letter to the Defense Commission of the National Education Association and which was printed in the Santa Rosa, California, Independent J our· nal: Defense Commission National Education Assn. Washington, D.C. In a recent issue of the American Mercury I read an article deal­ing with the efforts of Mrs. Ann Smart, of Larkspur, Calif., to have cer­tain books taken from the Marin County high school libraries, in which she found obscene material and some of which she considered Com­munistic. I corresponded with Mrs. Smart and received a list of the books together with excerpts from five of these and an editorial re­printed from The Houston Chronicle of March 23, 1955. If, as this editorial states, you defended the Tamalpais Union High School District, or any other district, wh ich had such books as "A Field of Broken Stones," by Lowell Naeve, or "Emotional Problems of Living," by English and Pearson, I think you are subject to most severe censure. In my opinion, as a life member of the NEA and a school teacher and administrator with 40 years experience, I would consider anyone who would defend having such books in a school library as being utterly unworthy of serving in an educational institution. I know all the arguments that are given that children should be exposed to life in the raw, but I think practically all of these arguments are completely invalid. We don't have to expose our children to filth or perversion and we can teach our children the facts of life in a clean, wholesome, and decent manner. There are some books that may be reasonably proper to have in a university library that should not be in a high school situa­tion. I, for one, feel that Mrs. Ann Smart has rendered our schools a real service in calling this situation to the attention of school and lay people. I am anxious to know exactly what the Defense Commission had to do with this case and, if you defended the keeping of all these books in the library, the grounds on which such a decision was arrived at. Did your Defense Commission read the full text of the books in ques tion? If you did put up such a defense, all I can say is tha t I hope the members of the commission will be speedily displaced from office and I will so recommend to those who may be able to do something about it. May I have an early reply? E. J.HUMMEL Deputy Superintendent of Schools Beverly Hills Shipment of Scrap Iron to Japan Is Being Duplicated in Case of Russia Because of the increasing executive policy of "Government by Secrecy", it is probably going to be a little difficult for the presid~nt to persuade the Congress to hand over almost $5,000,000,000.00 to g1ve to foreign countries which he requested on March 19th. The McLellan Committee in the Senate has not given up on trying to pry out of the Whit~ H~use the information needed i': order to intelligently pass on legislation before that body, and Chairman Mc­Lellan strongly hints that there may be no action on the Foreign Aid bill until such information is forthcoming. At the present time, Chairman McLellan is having io get informa­tion about the relaxing of controls on strategic material for shipment to Russia by way of our European "allies," from sources outside the United States. In a speech on the floor of the Senate on March 22, Sen­ator McLellan indicated that Congressional patience is wearing thin in the matter of important and vital action being taken by the executive branch and information about such action being withheld from the Congress and from the American people. It has now developed that the list in the Battle Act which was passed by the Congress .to prevent so-c~lled allies of this country fr?m sending strategic matenals to the Soviet bloc, was changed fo llowmg the June. 1954, secret meeting in Paris at wh ic ~ time th_at ubiquit?us little pest, Harold Stassen, added t_wo. hu_ndred Items to the ma~en als which now may be shipped to Russ1a, mdtrectly, to help them bmld up their war machine. The new list in the Battle Act deletes the items, previously barred to the_ Russians,. which the great statesman from Minnesota decided at Pans the Russians should now have. The money-mad Americ~ns who ~hipi:ed scrap iron to Japan which was later used to kill Amer1can soldiers 111 World War II now have a counterpart in the Minnesota mad-man who is determined to do a re­peat performance Everybody knows that the junk dealers wh~ shippe~ the scrap iron to Japan did it for the money the~ got out of 1t _but, smce Stass_en is not benefitting financially , the questiOn naturally mtrudes on an In­telligent mind: "what is his motive". Nothing is much more in furiating to a taxpayer who wdtcs a serious letter to representatives in Washing­ton concerning conditions he tind11 are no longer tolerable and then gets a two-paragraph reply in the shape ot a form letter written and signed by some third assistant secretary, in· forming him that the matter is beinll taken care of and everything is under control. Although they are so indignant that they could bite a ten-penny nail in ~tl!.1r~~~t L~i~~:~~. ~o~o~~~~;~l a~~~~ nesi executive, however, is an ex­ception. In answer to an earnest communica· tion to Senator Lyndon Johnson re­cently demanding to know what he was doing to prevent the tremendous waste in defense spending, Mr. Byers got the usual form letter in reply in­cluding this pompous paragraph: "You may rest assured that I shall continue to give my best thought ancf" efforts toward reducing any govern­ment waste or inefficiency that may exist." But the senator's "best thought" apparently was not good enough for Mr. Byers who wrote him right back again and told him that the reply was not acceptable and that he wanted to know what the senator was personally doing about the dan­gerous waste in defense spending. '"You and Sam Rayburn are sup­posed to be the two most powerful men in the Congress," M r. Bye rs' second letter said. The spenders can't throw away our money unless the Congress appropriates it. You two men are well informed and well know what is going on . . . We, your con­stituents, don't believe in builriin&" six-lane highways in Portug·ru nor in bailing t he Bril ish governmen t out so it can reduce taxes nor in givi ng Denmark millions of dollars so that the Danes may balance their budget, nor in giving to India a hund1·ed loco­motives and many shiploads o£ wheat; nor in building thousands of privies Ior Philippine !garrotes, nor do we want our money spent to raise the standard o£ living of all the backward people o! the world, thus bringing down our own . . . Please tell me def­initely where you stand." Minute Women not Afraid Of 'Controversies' The monthly bulletin or news­letter put out by the Minute Wo­men of the U.S.A. I nc., is highly interesting and within its four pages carries forceful and convinc~ ing editorials on current political issues which indicate that the Min­ute Women have no fear of the bogeyman ''controversial ques­tions." Perhaps they realize that noth­ing is worth discussing at this particular time in the nation's his­tory unl~ss it is eontroversial and that any organization of women which shies away from such dis­cussions is not much more than a glorified Ladies Aid Society. In the March edition of their Newsletter emphasis is given to the Alaska Mental Health bill now before Congress and which many thoughtful Americans oppose as an effort of sinister forces to set up an "Alaskan Siberia" in the far North. The Newsletter was highl:y complimentary of the meeting o( four thousand good Americans who gathered on invitation of For America in New York on Washing­ton's birthday and of which Mr. Dan Smoot, distinguished Texas writer and lecturer, was moder­ator. Pago6 THE SOUTHERN CONSERVATIVE Aprn, 1956 Fine Negro Citizen Tells of Communists Plans to Infiltrate American Churches Manning Johnson is an American Negro who, like so many of his white brothers, was beguiled into becoming a Communist party mem~ her. He joined the party in 1930 and served as an organizer and as a member of the Communist Party for ten years. He left the party in 1940 and since that time has more than m~de amends for the time he spent with that international conspiracy against the free world. Johnson had acquired such vast knowledge of Communist tactics in the infiltration of American institutions, and especially with their methods of indoctrinating religious groups in this country, that he was employed as consultant in the investigating section of the Department of Justice, where he rendered invaluable service. It was while he was holding this position that he testified before the Committee on Un-American Activities of the House of Representa­tives in 1953 giving documentation on the all-out efforts of the Soviets to corrupt our religious leaders and institutions, knowing, as they so well do, that American churches are the bulwarks of morality and free­dom and the most powerful factors in perpetuating and sustaining our Christian Republic. Johnson quoted from Earl Browder's book "What is Communism?" in order to give a clear picture of what the Party is doing to break down religion in the United States. He selected this paragraph from Browder's book as emphasizing what he meant: "It is significant that the Communist Party, more than any other labor group, has been able to achieve successful united fronts with church groups on the most important issues of the day. This is not due to any compromise with religion on our part. In fact by going among the religious masses we are, for the first time, able to bring our anti-religious ideas to them." If any one doubts the wisdom of this man in pointing out this reference to Communist infiltrations of American religious bodies, he has only to consider that today, three years later, organized church groups in the United States are on record as approving practically every policy urged by Communist leaders such as breaking down our immigration barriers, cessation of investigations of Communist infiltra­tions into government, recognition of Red China, racial integration of schools and churches and all other policies first initiated in the Kremlin, and gradually adopted by pro-Communists in this country. Further explaining the poisoning of American religious organiza­tions, Johnson told the Committee: "Once the tactic of infiltrating re­ligious organizations was set by the Kremlin, the actual mechanics of implementation of the 'new line' was a question of following the general experiences of the living church movement in Russia where the Com­munists discovered that the destruction of religion could proceed much faster through infiltration of the church by Communist agents operat­ing within the church itself. "The Communist leadership in the United States realized that the infiltration tactic in this country would have to adapt itself to Ameri .. can conditions and the religious makeup peculiar to this country. In the earliest stages it was determined that with only small forces it would be necessary to concentrate Communist agents in the seminaries and divinity schools. The practical conclusion, drawn by the ReQ. leaders was that these institutions would make it possible for a small Commu­nist minority to influence the ideology of future clergymen in the paths most conducive to Communist purposes." There is much, much more of the testimony including the informa­tion that Harry F. Ward, well known Protestant American minister was in charge of small forces in the seminaries. The rest of the story which Johnson told the Committee is history and informed Americans know how far the Communist conspiracy to take over American religious - leaders has advanced, including the final re-writing of the Bible into what is often referred to as the "Revised Standard Perversion Edition." Americans owe much to this colored American who, although led astray by the Communist forces for a time, has more than made atone­ment, and also they owe much to the vast army of Christian ~inisters ~n this country who have refused to fall for the attempts to enhst them 111 'support of the Satanic conspiracy against Christianity which is the Communist Party. "Taint Funny McGee." From a Connecticut manufacturer: "Your March edition was grand as they aU aTe. but I thought that it seemed a little more serious than usual. I look forward to the witty and amusing way you write of happenings in Washington and often practically 1split my sides' laughing at your manner of treat .. ing political subjects." Well, gee, mister have you read ·what is hap­pening in. Washington lately such as the potential give-away of five more billions of American t~-pay­ers money, the proposals to totally abolish States Rights, the prospect of the continuance of irresponsible leadership and such? In fact, it is all so serious that we have been unable to crack a smile, much less a joke. until we received the bro­chure front the Department of t11e Interior discussed elsewhere in these pages. After having the same office telephone for over six years. we had about reached t«e point where we had memorized it, when the T e l e p h o n e Company up and changed it by adding another digit and a different exchange. If they keep on adding numbers and mak­ing it harder on our faulty mem­ory, we are thinking of taking it out and reverting to carrier pig­eons and smoke signals to com­municate with the outside world. Assistant Secretary of State Clair Wilcox told the American Association of Junior Colleges in New York City recently that facts about Communism should be taught in every American coUege. In most American colleges they a1·e doing this already, except the ufacts" as they see them make the Soviet System seem superior to our own free enterprise econ­omy. Mr. ·Wilcox is a former NRA economist and a member of the editorial staff of Fortune Mag­azine, to give an idea of his back­ground. House Group Intends to Force Status of Fo~ces Treaty Issue Committee Should Back Up and Start Over On Alaskan Bill In the case of the Alaska Mental Health, bill in which the same forces who railroaded it through the House of Representatives arc now high· pressuring members of the Senate to pass it with all the objectionable features intact, it would seem to be high time that members of the Com· mittee on Interior Affairs of the Sen· ate put an end to all the nonsense. Highly competent and qualified organizations such as the Associa· tion of American Physicians and Surgeons have informed the Com­mittee that the bill has dangerous features in it, including its adminis· trative provisions, and that while a measure to take care of the mentally ill of Alaska is highly desirable, the bill as passed by the House of Repre· sentatives is so loosely written that it encourages potential abuse of power by bureaucrats. If the bill were what its proponents claim, it could say so in so many words and leave no room for doubt by any one. Instead it rambles on and on interminably over reams of paper and employs ambiguous, meaningless and confusing terms and prov1sions which would require a Philadelphia lawyer to interpret. If the Senate Committee which has the blll under consideration wanted to render a definite service, they would re.write the bill in plain English, minus double·talk, say what they need to say and then vote it out of committee. Rambling verbiage, double·talk and loose construction of words seem to constitute a positive d:sease which is chronic: with those who write laws in Washington. There Is Definitely Something Very Wrong With This Picture In March, 1947, President Truman issued executive order No. 9835 which placed an embargo on information concerning Communist infiltration in­to the government and which helped to prevent the exposure of Alger Hiss until much later. The Congress was controlled by Republicans at the time and the purpose of the blackou~ order from the White House was to hinder their investigations into subversion and crookedness of the Fair Deal ad· ministration. In May, 1954, President Eisenhower issued a directive clamping down on information which would prevent the exposure of a plot among administra4 tion officials against Senator Joe Mc­Carthy. This May, 19M, directive is still in effect and has been used twice in recent weeks to keep the McLellan Committee o( the Senate from hav­ing information badly needed in its investigative work. The directive was invoked by witnesses in the National Labor Relations Board who were called to testify on matters re· lating to subversion. It was also invoked in the case of Harold Stassen who was called before the McLellan Committee to tell of his secret agreement in 1954 with so·called "allies" in which he had released for shipment to Russia by way of these same "allies" 200 items previously on the embargo list. The serious question involved here is whelher or not a Chief Executive has the legal or moral right to with· hold information from the Congress and from the people of the United States for whom he works as their public servant. The information about the items released by Stassen ·was known to foreign countriL", including Russia, and had been published in English papers. It was only the Congress and the American people who were re· fused it Clearly there is something wrong with this picture. (From the Houston Chronicle) Last year the House of Repre .. sentatives showed in no unmis­takable terms what it thought of the status of forces agreements, under which members of the Am­erican armed services stationed abroad are deprived of their con .. stitutional guarantees. By a vote of 174 to 56, or considerably more than three to one1 the House last May 18 attached an amendment to the armed forces reserve bill bar­ring the shipment of American troops to any country which "ex­ercises criminal jurisdiction over American armed forces personnel stationed within its boundaries." The amendment died when the reserve bill was shelved. Now a new move to kill the status of forces treaties is brewing, and the administration is described as worried about its entire foreign aid program as a result. And well it might be. For a group of con­gressmen is planning to attach a rider to the foreign aid bill which would nullify the agreements. As several of the countries re­ceiving the largest amounts of for­eign aid have status of forces treat­ies with this country, the amend­ment if passed would, in the words of Chairman Richards of the for­eign affairs committee, "practically stop foreign aid." That, in the administration's view, would be catastrophic, al­though there is considerable evi­dence that most citizens ,.Po not agree. In fact the administration not only is asking for a much larg­er foreign aid appropriation than last year, but also is seeking long­term commitments for such big projects abroad as the Aswan dam in Egypt. This is fantastic in view of the fact that agencies of govern .. ment handling domestic matters have to come before Congress ev­ery two years for their appropria­tions- they get no such long-term commitments. But the administration also fav­ors continuation of the status of forces treaties, although the people quite evidently do not approve of their fighting men being tried in foreign courts, under strange and sometimes barbarous laws and without the protections of the Bill of Rights. Judging by that more than three-to-one vote in the House last year against the status of forces treaties. the administration this time will have to choose between foreign aid and the treaties. The signs are that it can't have both. From a gracious lady in Balti­more: uYou truly have a gift for expressing facts which are so obvious that most people can't see them. You have my unbounded admiration." We have given France, since World War II, $10,000,000,000 in economic and military aid to help {(sta'l/e off Communism." At their last election 5,460,000 of the French people themselves voted the Comntunist ticket which put 150 Communists in the French As­sembly, the largest number ever to sit in that body. Now the Con­gress 1s being asked not to cut off foreign aid but to increase it over last year. Ye gods, what superb statesmanship! ff April, 1956 TH! SO U TH ERN CON SE RVATIV ! Pegt 7 .-.. Senate Subcommitte Report Shows Harry Dexter White Was One of the Most Powerful Men in the American Government· When the full story of Harry Dex­ter White is written, it will consti­tute one of the blackest pages in American history. Although little was known of him during the years when he held top posts in Washington, information is coming to light now which indicates that he was perhaps the most power­ful figure in the Communist conspir­acy against the United States even as Roosevelt and Truman, respective­ly, were naming him to one impor­tant office after another. The Subcommittee of the Senate Judiciary Committee, of which the Honorable James 0. Eastland of Mis­sissippi is chairman, has devoted Part 30, the latest record of Interlocking Subversion in Government Depart­ments entirely to White's letters and papers which show his intimate as­sociation with practically every top­ranking official in the nation's capi­taL This volume comprises some 500 pages of White's memos, appointment sheets, official documents and per­sonal notes, papers and letters which were assembled by the Committee with the assistance of Hon. Louis C. Wyman, Attorney General of New Hampshire, who gave the Committee White's secret documents and papers found during a search of White's summer home at Fitzwilliam, in that State. Any attempt to condense five hun­dred pages into an editorial of this length would, of course, be futile and even the high spots of the startling disclosures would require space equal to that of an entire newspaper. Like so many of the queer and mysterious characters who swarmed into the government during Roose­velt's and Truman's administrations, many of whom are still there, Harry Dexter White was born with one name and buried under another. Be­fore emigrating to this country in the early eighties from Europe, the family name was Weiss according to White's testimony some years ago. Although White's diary or list of appointments, found after his death and included in the Eastland report, indicated that he was on intimate terms with practically every high of­ficial of government, there is one name threaded throughout the entire recital which seems to appear more frequently than any other. That is the name of Bernard Bernstein, an attorney for ten years in the Depart­ment of the Treasury. The record shows that Bernstein has spoken from the same platform with Muriel Draper and that a participant in the meeting which he addressed was Elizabeth Gurley Flynn, veteran Com­munist leader indicted under the Smith Act. The meeting where he spoke on this particular occasion was the Congress of American Women, later disbanded after being cited as Communist by the Attorney General of the United States. Alabama Judge Says Federal Snoopers Will Go to Jail A public official after our own heart is Judge George C. Wallace, of the Third Judicial Circuit of the State of Alabama. Concerning the proposal to send Federal officials into the South to snoop around and see who is and who is not being allowed to vote Judge Wallace said that the first Federal officer who came inter­fering in the affairs of his State would be put in jail period. And he didn't stutter when he said it, either. We used to have courageous men like this in all of­fices from the Supreme C 1urt and the White House on down but somewhere along the way we lost them and got weaklings in their place. White's record of appointments showed that from July 1941 to Feb­ruary, 1946, White and Bernstein conferred together a total of 115 times and that present at these small conferences were such characters as Laughlin Currie, Harold Glasser, An­drei Gromyko, Frank V. Coe, and scores of other familiar names. Ac­cording to Who's Who, Bernstein was financial adviser to General Eisen­hower for Civil Affairs and Military Government, European and Mediter­ranean theaters from 1942 to 1945. Perhaps the first impression one gets from studying this document of the Eastland Committee is one of amazement that a man who was hon­ored time after time by Presidents of the United States, and trusted ;~!~io~0sm;it~fn !'~~ ~~~u~n;~~r~~~= ernment, should have found it possi­ble to commit treason against the country which had given his family sanctuary and enabled him to climb to the top of the ladder during the time this country was at war. When White resigned from the In­ternational Monetary Fund to which Truman had appointed him, so great was the latter's regard for him that he wrote White in which he said among other things: "I know you can view with a great deal of personal satisfaction your career in public service, crowned as it has been by your ceaseless efforts to make a real contribution to international trade through the International Bank and the International Monetary Fund. . •. You have filled with distinc­tion your present assignment as U.S. Representative on the Board of Executive Directors of the In­ternational Monetary Fund and your unfaltering efforts have been a source of great pride to me ... " On page 2637 of this Eastland Com~ mittee report, appears a memo writ­ten soon after the close of World -'W'ar II by Fred Smith, Assistant to the Secretary of the Treasury, Henry Morgenthau during the period of the war and for some years afterward. This memo shows that the Morgen­thau Plan which would have reduc­ed all of Germany to a shambles, was not conceived by Morgenthau at all although Morgenthau tacitly ac­cepted it as his brain-child. The memo by Mr. Smith says: On August 7, 1944, at approxi­mately 12:35 p.m., in a tent in Southern England, the Morgenthau plan was born. Actually it was Gen­eral Dwight D. 'Eisenhow~r who launched the project. In conversa­tion, General Eisenhower set the spark destined to grow into one of the most bitterly denounced, most fervently hailed, and, according to varying reports, the most damag­ing project or the most far-seeing plan to guarantee a peaceful Ger­many ever conceived. According to a Washington newspaper on JanuaTy 16 of this year, the American taxpayers are going to be tapped for fifty mil­lion, repeat fifty million dollars to const1·uct a new State Depart~ ment building. It will, according to this paper, c o v e r four city blocks and will be the biggest building in the district. One thing we've got to say for the planners is that they don't do anything on a small scale. They s h o o t the works and what do they care? It's not their money. And any way, what is a lousy little old fifty mil­lion dollars to a government which can afford to fluff off five billion at one clip as a present to foreign~ ers who have no intention of ever paying it back. Think nothing of it! The subject first came up at been taUght to be paranoid in their lunch in General Eisenhower's mess actions and thoughts, and they have tent. Secretary Morgenthau, Assls- to be snapped out of it. The only tant to the Secretary, Harry D. way to do that is to be good and White, and I were there. White hard on them. I certainly sec no (Harry Dexter White) spoke ol point in bolstering their economy Germany, which was now certain or taking any other steps to help to be defeated. He questioned the them." system of the Army pursuing its White remarked: ''We may want standing orders; that Civil Affairs to quote you on the problem of was to move up and bolster the handling the German people." Eis-economy quickly to keep the Allied enhower replied that he could be troops from bogging down in a mo- quoted. He said: "I will tell the ~=f~ ~~a~c~~~m;~lu:~~~ka!~ih WJ!~~ President myself if necessary." many was an entirely different From that moment Morgenthau's matter; we were not to use Ger- chief interest in life was his own many as a thoroughfare; Germany conviction that General Eiscnhow-was the end of the road. Once con- er's description of the German peo-quered, there would be no problem pie as "paranoid" was apt, and that with supply lines, and the country by accepting this fact a plan could did not need to support a fighting be created that would forever pre-force. Yet (said White) the Army vent the German people from mak-directive had not been altered to ing war. suit the changed situation. As it now stood, troops would enter The memo goes on for many hun- Germany, Civil Affairs would move dreds of words and tells how from up, the mark would be establish- that day in the General's tent, Mor-ed, utilities would be repaired and genthau took the ball and ran with "" life be reestablished on as high a it and refers to his remark at Car-plane as feasible, as quickly as pos- negie Hall on April 12, 1943, "before sible. a group of Manhattan banker· and White said, "What I think is that ~=~~~=~e~ai~:a~:~~~ ;;c::!a~~ad~o~~ :~~ns:~~lda~iv0~~:tue~i~~e t~e~~:l: !~~f ~:e~l:!~~si 0~~~el;~~;m~~: ~C:, down before we do anything with that will rock Nazi Germany to its it." rotten, blood- stained foundation." Here Eisenhower became grim, The memo tells step, by step, what and made the statement that ac- happened after that until the Mor-tually sparked the German hard- genthau plan finally "died of neg-ship plan. He said: ''1 am not in- lect." terested in the 'German economy · and personally would not like to Thus it was that Harry Dexter bolster it if that will make it any White who was first appointed to easier for the Germans." He said high office by Franklin D. Roosevelt, he thought the Germans had pun- praised extravagantly by Truman and ishment coming to them: ''The ring- permitted to sit in on a conference of leaders and the ss troops should a President-to-be as the economic ex-be given the death penalty with- termination of a great na tion was out question, but punishment planned and all he used these high should not end there." contacts and associations for was to promote plans for overthrowing the He felt the people were guilty of American government. supporting the regime and that made them a party to the entire Another thing that was not gener- German project and be, personal- ally realized w1til the Eastland re-ly, would like \o "see things made port came out was that White helped good and hard for them for awhile." plan the United Nations. On page He pointed out that talk of letting 2511 of the Eastland Committee re- Germany off easy after taking due port is a facsimile of White's appoint-care of the top people came from ment which says: "The United Na-those who feared Russia and want- tions Conference on Organization. ed to strengthen Germany as a po- San Francisco, 1945. The bearer, Mr. tential bulwark against any desires Harry D. White is an Adviser of the for expan~ion which Russia might United States Delegation. Signed Al-some day have. He said: "This is a ger Hiss, Secretary General." problem, because the strength of This .Eastland Report is of vital Russia is fantastic." On the other concern to all Americans who try to hand, he did not personally think keep abreast of the developments in that Russia would want anything the conspiracy aga'inst the United "because she now has all she can States, but it is doubtful if other digest, and she has problems of her copies of the Report can be obtained. own which will keep her busy un- We were fortunate in getting our til long after we are dead." copy early but many others who have The General declared he saw no tried frantically to get one were in-purpose served in treating a "para- formed that the supply was cxhaust-noid" gently, and the "whole Ger- cd, although it may still be possible man population is a synthetic para- to buy one from the Government noid. All their life the people have Printing Oific .... It's well worth a try. From a woman subscriber in Oakland, California: "You always see through humbug to the truth, with a laugh thrown in, which we can certainly u.se in these tragic days. But, after enjoying the laugh, I always find you have pin~ pointed the truth - a gratifying change from the distortions of fact we are fed each day. You are do­ing a wonderful job for all of us. Thank you., Rumors persist in Washington that an undercover effort is being made to chuck Dulles out as Sec­retary of State. Off-hand, that would seem to be all to the good but we tremble in our boots at the prospect of some one new be­ing appointed. And it is no use to kid ourselves and say that any one would be preferable to Dulles. Senator Eastland to Speak In Houston May 16 Senator James 0. Eastland of Mississippi has accepted an invita­tion to make an address in Houston on Wednesday, May 16th. His address will be given at the Music Hall at 8 p.m. on that date - and Houston citizens are expecting large delegations from out.-of·town points to pack the auditorium to its capacity. East Texas is expected to be heavily represented. Senator Eastland, as usual, will , - discuss the Supreme Court ruling and plans for the South to keep its traditional school policy intact. That's what we said about Tru­man in 1952! Page 8 Public Morality Demands That Mr. Clark Speak Up Tom Clark is Texas' involuntary gift to the Supreme Court of the United States. In June, 1948, when he was Attar· ~aQv General through appointment by Harry Truman, Clark declared The American Committee for the Pro­tection o! the Foreign Born was sub· versive and Communist. In May, 1954, as a member of the Supreme Court Clark joined in a unanimous decision of that body on segregation and in the ruling handed down Theodore Brammeld was one of those listed as authority for the ruling. Theodore Brammeld was a mem­ber of The American Committee for the Protection of the Foreign Born, which Clark had previously branded as a Communist organization dedi­cated to the overthrow of the Amer- . lean government. Brammeld had nine other Communist Front affiliations. In 1947, as Attorney General, Clark cited the Civil Rights Congress as aubversive and Communist. In May .. 1954, Clark joined in the ruling on segregation in which a Negro E. Franklin Frazier was cited by the Supreme Court as one of its authori­ties lor the decision. Frazier was a member of the Civil Rights Congress which Clark had declared to be sub­versive and Communist in 1947. Fra­zier was also lined up with 17 other Communist Fronts. In view of this mystifying behavior on the part of Clark, some questions arise which cannot be ignored or alossed over, If Clark knew what he was talk­ing about in 1948 when he declared The American Committee for the Pro­tection of the Foreign Born was Com­munist, why did he accept a mem­ber of that organization as his au­thority for a Court ruling in 1954? If he was right in 1947 in holding up the Civil Rights Congress as Communist, why did he take one of Jts members in 1954 as his authority in passing on a question of almost liie and death concern to the people of his native State and of the entire nation? As a member of the Court did not Mr. Clark have the right to enter a minority report? Since he did not take advantage of this prerogative, is he now prepared to say that he was wrong In declaring The Amer­ican Committee for the Protection of the Foreign Born to be subversive and Commun-ist In 1948 and if so, is Jt not his duty now to make public apology to such organization? Since he declared the Civil Rights Congress Communist in 1947 and in 1954 accepted one of its members as his authority for a Supreme Court ruling, isn't it incumbent on him to tell the American people why he would brand a man as an enemy ol this country in 1947 trying to over­throw the American government and then allow that same man to sway the highest judicial body in the United States in 1954? If he was wrong in declaring these organizations to be Communist, he l1as done them a great injustice. Ii he was right in declaring them to be Communist, then he has done an irreparable injury to the people of the United States in being a party to a ruling affecting their future destiny which was based on the de­tisions of those he knew to be Com· munists. Although members of the Supreme Court traditionally do not give out statements to the press, breaking pre­cedents is the thing the present Court does best, and in the interest of pub­lic and official morality, Justice Clark is obligated to come clean and say whether he was wrong in 1947 and 1948 or In 1954. It is humanly impossible for him to have been right on all three oc­casions. THI .SOUTHERN CONS!RVATIVI April, 1956 Department of the Interior Seeks to Boost Perhaps the Wish Is Type of Project That Needs No Advertising Father to the Thought We did a double-take recently when we received a handsome, expensive and lavishly-illustrated document put out by the Department of the Interior in Washington. It contained twenty-four pages of graphs, charts, blueprints and photographs of certain structures located in the nation's parks, playgrounds and beauty spots from New York to Cali· fornia and from Minnesota to Georgia, and all points in between. Blinking our eyes and blushing slightly, we noted with some dis­may that this elegant and imposing government brochure bore the rather frank and startling title of "Comfort Stations and Privies." Re­covering from our initial shock, we plunged quickly into the opening paragraph to be greeted by this interesting preamble: "It has been said that those who will not lead the field in proper sanitation, should get out of it and allow those who are not ashamed to be proud of their toilet buildings, to take over." (After all, why not? They've taken over prac­tically everything else). Pausing for a moment to digest this world-shattering pronounce­ment, we read on: "In general usage, any distinction between 1Comfort Station' and 1Privy' may be merely one of gentility of phrase." (We had never thought of it in just that way, but it sounds reasonable). A little further on, our bulging eyes were greeted with this arresting assertion: "It is elected herein to consider the more modern Comfort Station at greater length than the more primitive privy." Hurrying on to the pictorial illustrations, we found that they had started in with the uprimitives" and had gone on from there, gradually working up to vast structures that rival the Taj Mahal [or size and mag­nitude, with scenic view~ conducive to meditation and profound thought, given primary consideration. In Devil's Den Park in Arkansas, the last word in "primitiveness" is indicated by the humble structure presented in the illustration and which gives the appearance of having been designed by the immortal James Whitcomb Riley. Under it--the picture, we mean-is to be found this explanatory footnote: "This is an unpretentious structure which has a definite woods character-a homespun propriety, difficult to analyse." (We didn't think anything could stump the experts and defy analysis). Hastening on to Virginia, the brochure presents what they refer to as a upit privy" in Kendall State Park accompanied by this illuminat~ ing description obviously written by a top-flight intellectual who is master of the ambiguous phrase: "This structure is suited to a woodland setting without straining too much at 'nativeness'". This unidentified genius further enlightens us concerning the merits of this particular number as follows: uMen's and women's units are closely similar except as to plan arrangement. The not inconspicuous ventilators jauntily straddling the roof-comb may provoke argument." (Will this argument, maybe, overshadow the debate on farm subsidies and the foreign aid bill?) In Custer State Park in South Dakota, we are shown a usquare log" deal but an accompanying footnote gives us this ominous warning: uA partition wall of logs is likely not to prove as positive a separation between sections as is desirable". (We see what you mean). At this point we are let in on some of what seem to be their trade secrets: "When the facilities are of the privy type, separate structures for the sexes can be built at but little greater cost and this is recommended.'' (Aha! A segre­gationist in the Interior Department, eh?) Reluctantly tearing our gaze away from all the beguiling pictorial illustrations which portray the uprimitives" in various sections of the country, we skip over to the 11moderns" where the builder's art in this field has attained perfection and his imagination has been a1lowed to run riot and for a few enraptured moments we revel in undreamed-of beauty of line, style and design. Arriving finally at the last illustration, we are permitted an en­thralling view of the ultra-modern job at Logan Pass in Glacier National Park which faintly resembles a Sultan's summer palace except that it is dim of outline, making it difficult to distinguish where the building leaves off and the rocky exterior begins. This is all cleared up, however, by the obliging footnote which explains that the overall objective was to uskillfully blend the building with the rugged terrain in a treatment that amounts almost to camouflage.'' ((We always wondered why those places were so hard to find but we never dreamed that the Federal government hired experts to disguise them much as Mother Nature protects the quail from the hunter by blending its color with that of the surrounding bushes). In justice to the Department of the Interior, we must admit that this brochure is a work of art and a thing of beauty and, after viewing its remarkable display, one is almost tempted to knock off from work and call up a travel bureau. However, we do not think the Department was justified in spend­ing the thousands of dollars of taxpayers' money which the brochure obviously cost in order to discuss the intimate details and point out the merits or shortcomings of the various models. It is our considered opinion that such structures are solid and established American institutions which will continue to enjoy the support and good will of the travelling public without benefit of ad­vertising or encouragement from a Federal government agency. On March 13, the Associated Press carried a release quoting Senator Lyndon Johnson of Texas as expressing the belief that there would be no "third party" move .. ment organized at this time. To discourage such a movement Senator Johnson has introduced a bill in the Senate, S. 3308. It would amend the Communicatio•1s Act requiring television and radio to give equal time to all registered political parties, and confine such allotted time to only the two major parties as they are referred to in Johnson's bill, although in actual fact, of course, there is now only one Socialist Party operating un~ der two labels. Since the Communist Party is now supposedly outlawed, it is ob~ vious that Johnson did not have reference to that party and that his measure is directed toward keep­ing any "third party" from being granted television a'.'d radio time, which is a pretty neat trick, if you ask us. In the event of the passage of the proposed legislation, the elec~ torate would thus be deprived of hearing anything in the way of political discussions except by those defending Socialist principles of government since both major parties are committed to that ideology. Johnson apparently b e c a m e alarmed when a Chicagoan named Daly described by the Washington Post as an "America First" candi­date demanded equal time to ans­wer the President over the air_H._ had the Washington Post editorial inserted in the Congressional Rec~ ord. Both Democratic and Republi· can Pinks consider the term ' 1America First" the equivalent of a dirty word, and the idea of any~ body being for u America First" sends them into dithers. Propagandists Continue Myth Of Eisenhower Popularity The barrage of propaganda be­ing peddled through the press, television, radio and by newspaper columnists and pollsters to the ef-f: c~nt~~!?r~r~~~~~ni~s th~PS~~rt~X which supported him in 1952, em­phasizes how powerful and one­sided American communications mediae are. Any one who says that his pop­ularity in the South has not deter• iorated since the disgraceful Su­preme Court verdict on segrega· tion, simply is uninformed, pre­judiced or deliberately careless with the truth. It is remarkable, however, how persistently the propaganda con­tinues to be-lie the facts and how reluctant the promoters of the myth are to face the truth. We are so impressed with the power of organized propaganda that we actually believe that if these high-powered propagandists got together, they could sell us to Americans for Democratic Action as a liberal. left-winger and inter­nationalist, earnestly plugging for one-world government. That would take some doing but, [rom past accomplishments in the way of putting propag~n.da over in a big way, we are sure it could be done.
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