Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
The suppressed testament of Lenin
Image 29
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Lenin, Vladimir I.. The suppressed testament of Lenin - Image 29. 1935. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 22, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/6613/show/6591.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Lenin, Vladimir I.. (1935). The suppressed testament of Lenin - Image 29. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/6613/show/6591

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Lenin, Vladimir I., The suppressed testament of Lenin - Image 29, 1935, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 22, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/6613/show/6591.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title The suppressed testament of Lenin
Alternative Title The suppressed testament of Lenin: the complete original text, with two explanatory articles
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Lenin, Vladimir I.
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Trotsky, Leon
Publisher Pioneer Publishers
Date 1935
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Politics and government
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 47 pages; 20 cm
Original Item Location DK254.L3S9
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304557~S5
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 29
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1999966_028.jpg
Transcript alism. "Spite in general," he wrote weightily, "usually plays the worst possible role in politics." The struggle against the just, even though at first exaggerated, demands of the nations formerly oppressed, Lenin qualified as a manifestation of Great Russian bureaucratism. He for the first time named his opponents by name. "It is necessary^ of course, to hold Stalin and Dzherzhinsky politically responsible for this whole downright Great Russian nationalistic campaign." That the Great Russian, Lenin, accuses the Georgian, Dzhugashvili, and the Pole, Dzherzhinsky, of Great Russian nationalism, may seem paradoxical: but the question here is not one of national feelings and partialities, but of two systems of politics whose differences reveal themselves in all spheres, the national question among them. In mercilessly condemning the methods of the Stalin faction, Rakovsky wrote some years later: "To the national question, as to all other questions, the bureaucracy makes its approach from the point of view of convenience of administration and regulation." Nothing better could be said. Stalin's verbal concessions did not quiet Lenin in the least, but on the contrary sharpened his suspicions. "Stalin will enter a rotten compromise," Lenin warned me through his secretary, "and afterward he will deceive us." And that was just Stalin's course. He was ready to accept at the coming congress any theoretical formulation of the national policy on condition that it should not weaken his factional support in the center and in the borderlands. To be sure, Stalin had plenty of grounds for fearing that Lenin saw through his plans completely. But on the other hand, the condition of the sick man was continually growing worse. Stalin coolly included this not unimportant factor in his calculations. The practical policy of the general secretariat became the more decisive, the worse became Lenin's health. Stalin tried to isolate the dangerous supervisor from all information which might give him a weapon against the secretariat and its allies. This policy of blockade naturally was directed against the people closest to Lenin. Krupskaia did what she could to protect the sick man from contact with the hostile machinations of the secretariat. But Lenin knew 27