Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
The suppressed testament of Lenin
Image 28
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Lenin, Vladimir I.. The suppressed testament of Lenin - Image 28. 1935. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 22, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/6613/show/6590.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Lenin, Vladimir I.. (1935). The suppressed testament of Lenin - Image 28. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/6613/show/6590

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Lenin, Vladimir I., The suppressed testament of Lenin - Image 28, 1935, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 22, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/6613/show/6590.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title The suppressed testament of Lenin
Alternative Title The suppressed testament of Lenin: the complete original text, with two explanatory articles
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Lenin, Vladimir I.
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Trotsky, Leon
Publisher Pioneer Publishers
Date 1935
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Politics and government
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 47 pages; 20 cm
Original Item Location DK254.L3S9
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304557~S5
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 28
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1999966_027.jpg
Transcript still sharper. In the autumn of 1922 we were preparing the transformation of the Soviet state into a federated union of national republics. Lenin considered it necessary to go as far as possible to meet the demands and claims of those nationalists who had long lived under oppression, and were still far from recovering from its consequences. Stalin1, on the other hand, who in his position as People's Commissar for Nationalities directed the preparatory work, was conducting in this sphere a policy of bureaucratic centralism. Lenin, convalescing in a village near Moscow, carried on a polemic with Stalin in letters addressed to the Political Bureau. In his first remarks on Stalin's project for the federated union, Lenin was extremely gentle and restrained. He was still hoping in those days—towards the end of September 1922—to adjust the question through the Political Bureau and without open conflict. Stalin's answers, on the other handj, contained a noticeable irritation. He thrust back at Lenin the reproach of "hastiness", and with it an accusation of national "liberalism"—that is, indulgence to the nationalism of the outlanders. This correspondence, although extremely interesting politically, is still concealed from the party. The bureaucratic national policy had already at that time provoked a keen opposition in Georgia, uniting against Stalin and his right hand man, Ordjonikidze, the flower of Georgian Bolshevism. Through Krupskaia, Lenin got into private connection with the leaders of the Georgian opposition (Mdivani, Makharadze, etc.) against the faction of Stalin, Ordjonikidze and Dzherzhinsky. The struggle in the borderlands was too keen, and Stalin had bound himself too closely with definite groupings, to yield in silence as he had on the question of the monopoly of foreign trade. In the next few weeks Lenin became convinced that it would be necessary to appeal to the party. At the end of December he dictated a voluminous letter on the national question which was to take the place of his speech at the party congress if illness prevented him from appearing. Lenin employed against Stalin an accusation of administrative impulsiveness and spite against a pretended nation- 26