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The natural wealth of the Soviet union and its exploitation
Image 66
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Gubkin, I. M. (Ivan Mikhaĭlovich), 1871-1939. The natural wealth of the Soviet union and its exploitation - Image 66. 1932. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 22, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/6492/show/6481.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Gubkin, I. M. (Ivan Mikhaĭlovich), 1871-1939. (1932). The natural wealth of the Soviet union and its exploitation - Image 66. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/6492/show/6481

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Gubkin, I. M. (Ivan Mikhaĭlovich), 1871-1939, The natural wealth of the Soviet union and its exploitation - Image 66, 1932, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 22, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/6492/show/6481.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The natural wealth of the Soviet union and its exploitation
Alternative Title The natural wealth of the Soviet union and its exploitation: an address delivered before the extraordinary session of the Academy of Sciences of the Soviet union held in Moscow, June 21 - 27, 1931
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Gubkin, I. M. (Ivan Mikhaĭlovich), 1871-1939
Contributor (Local)
  • Akademii︠a︡ nauk SSSR
Publisher Co-operative Publishing Society of Foreign Workers in the U.S.S.R.
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Moscow, Russia
Date 1932
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Natural resources
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location HC335.G82 1932
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304510~S5
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 66
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1800818_065.jpg
Transcript so-called polymetallic ores, often in combination with gold and copper. As already said, pre-revolutionary Russia depended practically entirely on imported non-ferrous metals. The domestic output of zinc was only 28 per cent, and of lead 2 per cent of the requirements; the rest had to be imported from abroad. The feeble development of the production of these metals was due by no means to any absence of such deposits in Russia, or to the poor quality of the latter, but chiefly to the general technical and cultural backwardness of the country: first, there were bad roads, or no roads at all, and the deposits were situated far from the consuming centres; second, there was a decided lack of ability to handle the intricate processes of the dressing and metallurgical treatment of polymetallic ores, and so forth. Some of our deposits of polymetallic ores are among the richest in the world. Thus, the Altai Mountains, according to most general estimates, hold no less than 6 million tons of ores containing zinc, lead, copper, silver and gold. Preliminary exploring in Kazakstan resulted in an estimate sufficient for orientation purposes of 3,300,000 tons of polymetallic ores. The total supplies for the whole Union, according to data furnished by the Chief Geological Survey Bureau, are as follows: zinc, 1,566,000 tons; lead, 1,000,000 tons; silver, 2,733 tons; these ores are calculated to contain up to 50 tons of gold, on the basis of prospecting operations. The possible supplies of Altai and Kazakstan are estimated at a total of 9,300,000 tons. It is one of our most urgent tasks to make surveys and obtain more exact data. Without going into the question of our supplies of gold and platinum, I shall now pass on to consider the group of useful non-ore minerals. 64