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The natural wealth of the Soviet union and its exploitation
Image 51
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Gubkin, I. M. (Ivan Mikhaĭlovich), 1871-1939. The natural wealth of the Soviet union and its exploitation - Image 51. 1932. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 21, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/6492/show/6466.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Gubkin, I. M. (Ivan Mikhaĭlovich), 1871-1939. (1932). The natural wealth of the Soviet union and its exploitation - Image 51. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/6492/show/6466

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Gubkin, I. M. (Ivan Mikhaĭlovich), 1871-1939, The natural wealth of the Soviet union and its exploitation - Image 51, 1932, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 21, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/6492/show/6466.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The natural wealth of the Soviet union and its exploitation
Alternative Title The natural wealth of the Soviet union and its exploitation: an address delivered before the extraordinary session of the Academy of Sciences of the Soviet union held in Moscow, June 21 - 27, 1931
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Gubkin, I. M. (Ivan Mikhaĭlovich), 1871-1939
Contributor (Local)
  • Akademii︠a︡ nauk SSSR
Publisher Co-operative Publishing Society of Foreign Workers in the U.S.S.R.
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Moscow, Russia
Date 1932
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Natural resources
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location HC335.G82 1932
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304510~S5
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 51
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1800818_050.jpg
Transcript soil, while the mountainous character of the country insures high altitudes for the falling waters. The Turkestan section comes next. Western Siberia is low-lying land down to the Yenisei River, bounded on the south by the high Altai Mountains in which large rivers have their courses. Consequently, we have here a wealth of water power. It should be noted that in East Siberia, though there are high mountain ranges, the waters are ice-bound for the greater part of the year. Nevertheless some of the rivers represent immense stores of water power, e. g., the Yenisei, and especially the Angard River which has steep rapids along its course. The Far East is well supplied with water power resources, if we leave the regions of perpetual ice outside of our calculations. The European part of our Union represents a vast plain with calmly flowing rivers and a low fall of water, so that on the whole it does not favour the concentration of large water power resources. However, certain exceptional points are quite rich in concentrated water-fall power, e. g., the rapids of Dnieper, the Bug and the Dniester. Furthermore, on the periphery of the Lake Region in the north there is a considerable drop before the water reaches sea level (e. g., the Volkhov River rapids). The water power resources of our country have been -but little studied and the data badly digested. There is no complete chart showing our water power. Our total known water power is estimated at approximately 65 million horse-power. In this respect we are running neck to neck with the U.S.A. In order to gain even an approximate notion of the magnitude of this inexhaustible power which is being continually renewed, it should be borne in mind that the capacity of the stationary engines in the U.S.A. is 130 million h. p. (in our country this is so far only 12 million h. p.) while the total capacity of stationary engines throughout the world is 300 million h. p. 4 e 49