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Trotsky the traitor
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Bittelman, Alex, 1890-1982. Trotsky the traitor - Image 20. 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/6282/show/6269.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Bittelman, Alex, 1890-1982. (1937). Trotsky the traitor - Image 20. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/6282/show/6269

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Bittelman, Alex, 1890-1982, Trotsky the traitor - Image 20, 1937, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/6282/show/6269.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Trotsky the traitor
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Bittelman, Alex, 1890-1982
Publisher Workers Library Publishers
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1937
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
  • Socialism
  • History
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Trotsky, Leon, 1879-1940
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 30 pages; 19 cm
Original Item Location DK254.T6B588 1937
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304439~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 20
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_4721527_019.jpg
Transcript Trotsky. Why doesn't he go to Moscow and face the Soviet Court? While failing to disclose anything that would successfully contradict the evidence at the Moscow trial, Trotsky and his agents shout for "objective evidence". The declarations and testimony of the defendants and witnesses are not enough for them. State Prosecutor Vyshinsky, in his summing up speech, went into the question of objective evidence as follows: "What proofs have we in our arsenal from the viewpoint of juridical claims? The character of the present case is such that specific proofs possible in the case are determined by its character. We have the plot. We have in front of us a group of people who prepared to carry out a coup d'etat. The question can be placed as follows: You speak of the plot, but where are your documents? You speak of the program, but where is this program? Do these people anywhere possess a written program? You say that this is an organization (they call themselves a party), but where are their decisions, and the material proofs of this plotting activity—statutes, protocols, seals, etc.?" The question of evidence and its possible nature are placed here clearly. And what is the answer? Said Vyshinsky: "I take the liberty to affirm, in accordance with the primary demands of the science of criminal law, that such claims cannot be made in cases of plotting. In the case of plotting of a coup d'etat, it cannot be demanded that the matter be approached from a viewpoint such as: show us your protocols, decisions, membership cards and number of membership cards. Yes, we have a number of documents with regard to this. But even had we not possessed that, we would have all the same considered ourselves in the right to make the charge on the basis of the testimonies and declarations of the accused and witnesses, and, if you wish, on circumstantial evidence." Is this something unheard of? Is it only the practice of the Soviet Union to indict and convict people, in cases of treason to the state, only, or largely, on the basis of the confessions of the accused themselves? That's what Hearst and Trotsky say. The truth is that nearly everywhere, this is the procedure, the only possible procedure in most instances of treasonable plots. And this is what Trotsky and his agents are accused of. 20