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Trotsky the traitor
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Bittelman, Alex, 1890-1982. Trotsky the traitor - Image 18. 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/6282/show/6267.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Bittelman, Alex, 1890-1982. (1937). Trotsky the traitor - Image 18. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/6282/show/6267

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Bittelman, Alex, 1890-1982, Trotsky the traitor - Image 18, 1937, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/6282/show/6267.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Trotsky the traitor
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Bittelman, Alex, 1890-1982
Publisher Workers Library Publishers
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1937
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
  • Socialism
  • History
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Trotsky, Leon, 1879-1940
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 30 pages; 19 cm
Original Item Location DK254.T6B588 1937
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304439~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 18
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_4721527_017.jpg
Transcript CHAPTER III Confessions and Objective Evidence HEARST and Trotsky have been trying hard to invalidate the confessions of the defendants at the January trial. Trotsky and Hearst, and some others who trail behind them, have been talking of "torture" by the "Gay-Pay-Oo", promises of "leniency" to those who confessed, "confession gases", and what not. The reactionary capitalist press in this country, taking its cue from the Nazi Minister of Propaganda, Goebbels, was using all the tricks of corrupt journalism in its editorials and comments to becloud the trial, to ridicule it, to throw suspicion upon its genuineness. But to no avail. The correspondents of these papers, who were present at the trial, were telling in their dispatches one thing, while the editorials and comments were telling a different thing. The correspondents, most of them unfriendly to the Soviet Union and highly suspicious of it, could not help but be impressed with the truth. They heard the confessions and testimony of defendants and witnesses, they saw them in Court, they listened (no doubt very critically) to the examination of the prosecutor and to his summing up speech, and the impression they carried away was: it was genuine and real from beginning to end. And this was what they wired to their newspapers. Very revealing was the reaction of Walter Duranty (Moscow correspondent for The New York Times) to the confession of Radek. Duranty wrote: "It is a sad and dreadful thing to see your friends on trial for their lives. And it is sadder and more dreadful to hear them hang themselves with their own words. . . . Radek taught me so much and helped me so often—how could I believe him guilty until I heard him say so? Stalin himself had confidence in Radek until 18