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The witchcraft trial in Moscow
Image 24
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Adler, Friedrich. The witchcraft trial in Moscow - Image 24. 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 22, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5987/show/5974.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Adler, Friedrich. (1937). The witchcraft trial in Moscow - Image 24. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5987/show/5974

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Adler, Friedrich, The witchcraft trial in Moscow - Image 24, 1937, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 22, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5987/show/5974.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The witchcraft trial in Moscow
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Adler, Friedrich
Publisher Pioneer Publishers
Date 1937
Description In regard to the trial of Zinoviev, Kamenev and others in August, 1936.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Trials
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Zinovyev, Grigory Y.
  • Kamenev, Lev B.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 32 pages; 20 cm
Original Item Location DK267.P25 1937
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304411~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 24
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_3530838_023.jpg
Transcript if he did not know that his "Moscow colleagues" are useless in a political trial of this importance, since if they desired to conduct the defendants' case seriously they would have to fear the revenge of the rulers. Yet Pritt actually knows better than many others what efforts were made by the friends of Dimitrov and the other Communist defendants in the Reichstag Fire Trial to secure the admission of foreign lawyers and particularly the admission of Pritt. He himself took a prominent part in these efforts! Unfortunately, Pritt was not admitted as counsel to the Reichstag Fire Trial in Leipzig and so the expedient of the counter-trial was necessary. We are convinced that if Pritt could emancipate himself from his function as the defender of Vyshinsky he would already be obliged in the light of what is known regarding the false confessions in the Moscow Trial to express the same judgment"' as he pronounced at the end of the counter trial in London with regard to the Reichstag Fire Trial in Leipzig, namely, that: "The proceedings were an offense to the most primitive conceptions of humanity and justice" (translated from Rundschau, 1933, p. 1869). AFTERMATH OF THE KIROV ASSASSINATION In the middle of December, 1934, we wrote in the "Communications on the Conditions of Political Prisoners" (No. 25) that: "On December 1st Sergius Kirov, the Secretary of the Central Committee of the Bolshevik Party, was assassinated in Leningrad. Everyone understands the deep indignation and dismay which filled his friends and Party comrades, who regarded him as one of the most valuable forces in the Soviet Union. Nobody would be surprised if the Bolshevik dictatorship pursued the culprit or culprits with the full rigor of the law. He who takes up the sword must expect to perish by the sword. But what happened in the Soviet Union after this assassination was something very different. Twelve days after the assassination the assassin had not yet been tried, nothing was known to the public as to his motives, or even as to whether it was an action committed for political reasons or a personal act of revenge. But while the investigation against the murderer Nikolayev was still proceeding, there were mass executions in Leningrad and Moscow on December 6th. Thirty-seven death sentences were carried out in Leningrad, and 29 in Moscow, and the wave of terror is passing from town to town." Now, eighteen months later, we have some idea of what may be regarded as expiation for the assassination of Kirov. There have been reports of four trials: "The "International Juridical Association" in Paris, which is under Communist direction but normally appears as a "non-party" organization, has thought fit to state in connection with the Moscow Trial that political justice in the Soviet Union is "a truly popular justice" and, after giving the text of Pritt's first telegram to the News Chronicle, i.e., without taking into consideration ail the later statements published by Pritt, to declare that the International Juridical Association adopts "the conclusions of . . . its eminent collaborator, D. N. Pritt, K.C." (Bulletin of the International Juridical Association for September 15th, 1936.) This procedure is characteristic of the manner in which members of these Communist auxiliary organizations are treated. The well-known Socialists whose names are given at the head of this Bulletin, thus giving the reader the impression that they bear some responsibility for this publication, will seriously have to consider what consequences to draw from this incident. 22