Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
The witchcraft trial in Moscow
Image 23
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Adler, Friedrich. The witchcraft trial in Moscow - Image 23. 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 22, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5987/show/5973.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Adler, Friedrich. (1937). The witchcraft trial in Moscow - Image 23. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5987/show/5973

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Adler, Friedrich, The witchcraft trial in Moscow - Image 23, 1937, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 22, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5987/show/5973.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title The witchcraft trial in Moscow
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Adler, Friedrich
Publisher Pioneer Publishers
Date 1937
Description In regard to the trial of Zinoviev, Kamenev and others in August, 1936.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Trials
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Zinovyev, Grigory Y.
  • Kamenev, Lev B.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 32 pages; 20 cm
Original Item Location DK267.P25 1937
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304411~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 23
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_3530838_022.jpg
Transcript the "confessions" have turned, in a positively grotesque manner, into one of the principal figures in the alleged terrorist plans. The certainty that Sedov can never have been in the Hotel Bristol suffices for us to form a judgment as to the veracity value of the "confessions" made by the defendants. But should Pritt feel disposed to argue that in this detail there may be a mistake in the name of the hotel, although this particular statement by Holtzman was made with the utmost precision, he may convince himself by such an interrogation that the other assumption for this important item of proof, namely, the presence of Sedov in Copenhagen, is also unfounded and that the whole complex of the indictment which rests upon the activity of Holtzman, is thus based upon a fictitious confession. When there is a suspicion that the plea of guilty is fictitious then counsel is necessary even in the case of the best courts, if only to protect the defendant from himself. This applies all the more when there is a suspicion that the methods of the tribunals of the Inquisition are being applied. The sixteen defendants are dead. The manner in which their "confessions" were secured is covered with the cloak of secrecy. Here we will only speak of verifiable facts and not of hypotheses. We will therefore not discuss what may have happened during the preliminary investigation; it is sufficient for us to state that things must have happened at the preliminary investigation that urgently need explaining, and that just as in the case of all the earlier trials of this kind a "collective confession" was organized which is grotesque as a whole, and in its details rests upon false self-accusations. Precisely because what happened at the preliminary investigation is kept a secret, and because only counsel for defendants could ask to see the documents of the preliminary investigation, was the demand for the calling in of counsel really independent of the Soviet Government so fully justified. Pritt telegraphed to the News Chronicle from the Crimea that he was "shocked" at our telegram which contained this demand, and in his last pamphlet he devotes several pages to a polemic against the telegram. Pritt repeats the refrain of the semi-official spokesmen of Moscow: "The prisoners voluntarily renounced counsel; they could have had counsel without fee had they wished but they preferred to dispense with them." Pritt avoids seriously considering the question why all these defendants "voluntarily renounced" counsel. His explanation is extremely simple: they wanted to make a confession of guilt and they were themselves good speakers. And he maintains that they probably did not suffer by their decision, adding the tribute, "able as some of my Moscow colleagues are." Such is the level of argument to which Pritt descends. He acts as 21