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The witchcraft trial in Moscow
Image 20
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Adler, Friedrich. The witchcraft trial in Moscow - Image 20. 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 22, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5987/show/5970.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Adler, Friedrich. (1937). The witchcraft trial in Moscow - Image 20. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5987/show/5970

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Adler, Friedrich, The witchcraft trial in Moscow - Image 20, 1937, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 22, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5987/show/5970.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The witchcraft trial in Moscow
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Adler, Friedrich
Publisher Pioneer Publishers
Date 1937
Description In regard to the trial of Zinoviev, Kamenev and others in August, 1936.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Trials
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Zinovyev, Grigory Y.
  • Kamenev, Lev B.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 32 pages; 20 cm
Original Item Location DK267.P25 1937
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304411~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 20
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_3530838_019.jpg
Transcript what the spectator sees in court and did not make the slightest reference to the fact that there might also be problems which lie behind the scenes —in the preliminary investigation. Not until he had been driven on to the defensive by his critics did he go into the real problems in his last pamphlet. We must therefore consider the two phases of Pritt's defense of what happened in Moscow separately. During the first phase Pritt untiringly repeats how "courteous" the President of the Court and the Public Prosecutor were in their treatment of the defendants. They are not interrupted even when they speak at great length; the only thing that "seems odd to the English mind" is that the public applauds the speech of State Attorney Vyshinsky, and that no attempt is made to prevent the applause. But "where there is no jury" this "cannot do much harm." These first statements of Pritt's are based upon the tactics of regarding the Moscow trial as if it had taken place before a normal English court. In England the stress in legal proceedings really is placed upon the main proceedings in open court; here everything must appear. Criminal procedure on the Continent is very different, and inquisitorial jurisdiction is positively the extreme opposite of an English criminal trial. Here the stress is laid upon the preliminary investigation; at the proceedings in open court only the results of this investigation, the finished confessions, are made known. All this is, of course, very well known to Pritt, who has studied the various legal systems, and it was therefore extremely surprising that he should write and express opinions on a trial conducted on the principles of inquisitorial jurisdiction as if the confessions had been made before English iudges.* Thus he announces as the result of his observations that a "fair trial" had taken place, just as a Pritt of the 17th century on a visit to Rome, as a spectator at the tribunal of the Inquisition in the Dominican Convent of Sante Maria sopra Minerva, might have observed the absolutely "fair trial" when Galileo publicly abjured his errors. FICTITIOUS CONFESSIONS AND FALSE ADMISSIONS Pritt's thesis is that if the defendants plead guilty the court is not obliged to produce further proofs by documents or witnesses. The plea of guilty suffices as a basis for the verdict. Certainly many jurists, *In a book, The Moscow Trial" (Victor Gollancz, London, 1933), which is concerned with the "Metropolitan Vickers Trial" in which British defendants were among those who stood before the court in Moscow on a charge of "sabotage," A. J. Cummings indicated the difference between the two systems in the following words: "The narrative method is effective and impressive; for the prisoners are allowed virtually to tell the story themselves. We are permitted to know nearly everything relevant to the accusations they say to their interrogators. All that we are not permitted to know is what the interrogators say to them" (pp. 76-77, our italics). 18