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The witchcraft trial in Moscow
Image 5
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Adler, Friedrich. The witchcraft trial in Moscow - Image 5. 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 22, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5987/show/5955.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Adler, Friedrich. (1937). The witchcraft trial in Moscow - Image 5. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5987/show/5955

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Adler, Friedrich, The witchcraft trial in Moscow - Image 5, 1937, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 22, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5987/show/5955.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The witchcraft trial in Moscow
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Adler, Friedrich
Publisher Pioneer Publishers
Date 1937
Description In regard to the trial of Zinoviev, Kamenev and others in August, 1936.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Trials
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Zinovyev, Grigory Y.
  • Kamenev, Lev B.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 32 pages; 20 cm
Original Item Location DK267.P25 1937
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304411~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 5
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_3530838_004.jpg
Transcript PREFACE It would be an impertinence for me or anybody else to write a Preface to this pamphlet in order to commend to the public Friedrich Adler, long time Secretary of the Labor and Socialist International, or anything written by him. The author and his pamphlet speak for themselves. But it is neither impertinent nor necessary to point out to American readers the tremendous importance of ih.el subject with which Friedrich Adler deals and the fact of whicli he gives conspicuous proof, that those interested in justice for Trotsky are by no means all "Trotskyists." The attempt of the Soviet government and the Communist Party to deny all rights of asylum to Leon Trotsky throughout the world is based upon the revelations, or supposed revelations, of the Moscow trial here examined. It is on such miserable foundations that they seek to establish a precedent which would end political asylum, one of the oldest of civil rights, turn the world into a prison-house, and give the keys to the dictators. Communists exiled by the fascist dictators of Italy and Germany would be among the chief of sufferers. Nor is this all. At the very time when under their new line the Communist parties of the Third International are preaching a united front against fascism they themselves by the policy of which the Moscow trial of Kamenev, Zinoviev, and their companions, and now in all probability of Radek, is an illustration, are intensifying suspicion, division, and mutual hatred in the working class movements of the world. Worst of all, they are dimming the glory of the Socialist ideal in the minds of thoughtful observers. It is precisely because I am so eager to emphasize the differences between Soviet Russia and Nazi Germany and to extol the great achievements of Russia that I mourn a situation which permits men to say: "Hitler's blood purge of his party, Stalin's war against Trotsky—what is the difference in spirit, in method, in meaning for mankind?" It is because I believe that the Socialist revolution is the basis for true liberty and true justice, as well as for the economic well-being of the workers, that I must regard the Moscow trial and the temper it illustrates as a betrayal of Socialism and a blot upon a great record of achievement in Soviet Russia. In reading of the Moscow trial we are not studying an event that is over and done with. We are not simply trying to decide how and why such an amazing affair could have taken place. We are not primarily concerned with a final judgment upon Kamenev and Zinoviev. From my point of view, no interpretation of the trial can rehabilitate them. We are concerned with the living issue of justice, first for Trotsky, and second for others who dissent for one reason or another from some of Stalin's policies, and who challenge what they fear are dangerous bureaucratic tendencies in Soviet Russia. That is what gives importance to Friedrich Adler's study of the Moscow Trial. Norman Thomas. f