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Twelve days in Germany
Image 63
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Zinovyev, Grigory Yevseyevich, 1883-1936. Twelve days in Germany - Image 63. 1921. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5950/show/5928.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Zinovyev, Grigory Yevseyevich, 1883-1936. (1921). Twelve days in Germany - Image 63. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5950/show/5928

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Zinovyev, Grigory Yevseyevich, 1883-1936, Twelve days in Germany - Image 63, 1921, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5950/show/5928.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Twelve days in Germany
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Zinovyev, Grigory Yevseyevich, 1883-1936
Publisher The Union Publishing Co.
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Glasgow, Scotland
Date 1921
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
  • Socialism
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Germany
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 77 pages; 19 cm
Original Item Location HX276.Z45 1921
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304528~S5
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Public Domain: This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 63
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_8512320_062.jpg
Transcript 61 crowd and arresting and beating those taking part In the demonstration! An old sick woman who was carrying a little flag with the inscription: "We demand attention for the blind," and was arrested on the spot and the flag was roughly wrested out of her hand. The first thing that strikes one in modern Germany is the absence of any aniform system. You cannot state definitely which political system is now prevalent in Germany. What is Germany at the present time? Is it a Republic? If so, what republic—a bourgeois, a proletarian, or a republic dominated by generals? Or, do we witness here some peculiar relics of the old monarchy? Even now I have seen in public institutions the portrait of William II. hung in the most prominent place. And this does not seem to shock anybody. "Respectable" people hold that William suffered unjustly; the bourgeoisie has preserved all its former respect for this monarch, and his portrait continues to adorn public institutions. At the same time the condition of affairs differs very largely in various parts of Germany. Thus in Bavaria and in Munich, its capital, the most rabid reaction now reigns, whereas in Prussia and its capital, Berlin, there is comparatively more liberty. In Prussia, in Berlin, the Communists may print at least one paper—the "Rote Fahne." Nothing of the kind could appear in Bavaria. Every Communist or Left Independent is arrested there, and the White Guard gangs are being openly and unrestrictedly organised. Only a couple of weeks ago, when there was trouble brewing in Berlin, many people were of opinion that the White Guards would move from Munich to Berlin in order to repeat the Kapp "putch" there. Bavaria and Munich are now the strongholds of WHiite-Guard reaction. And if in the near future there will be a new march on Berlin, similar to that which took place last spring during Kapp's coup d'etat, there is no doubt that it will proceed from Bavaria, which at the present time is somewhat like the Promised Land for all the German White Guards. But there are even more glaring instances of this absence of uniformity; not only various parts of Germany but even of individual towns are totally unlike each other with regard to political conditions. The present bourgeois Menshevik