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Twelve days in Germany
Image 34
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Zinovyev, Grigory Yevseyevich, 1883-1936. Twelve days in Germany - Image 34. 1921. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5950/show/5899.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Zinovyev, Grigory Yevseyevich, 1883-1936. (1921). Twelve days in Germany - Image 34. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5950/show/5899

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Zinovyev, Grigory Yevseyevich, 1883-1936, Twelve days in Germany - Image 34, 1921, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5950/show/5899.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Twelve days in Germany
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Zinovyev, Grigory Yevseyevich, 1883-1936
Publisher The Union Publishing Co.
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Glasgow, Scotland
Date 1921
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
  • Socialism
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Germany
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 77 pages; 19 cm
Original Item Location HX276.Z45 1921
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304528~S5
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Public Domain: This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 34
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_8512320_033.jpg
Transcript 32 lished on the front page In heavy type the manifesto of the Armenian so-called "Labour Party" addressed to the Second International, i.e., to the so-called International Socialist Bureau. In this manifesto the Armenian Scheidemannists, in the name of Armenian "democracy," begged the Second International to protect them from the wicked Bolsheviks, who were alleged to be preparing an attack against the Armenian nation. There is not the slightest doubt that M. Hilferding knows quite well the present role of the so-called Armenian "democracy!" He is well aware that the present bourgeois Armenian government is simply a pawn in the hands of the Allies, that it served as a store agent for munitions for Wrangel, etc. He must have known that the so-called Labour Party of Armenia is a branch of international Scheidemannism. If, in spite of all that, Hilferding chose to print the manifestoes of this Armenian pseudo- Labour Party, it is precisely because the "Freiheit" has become a disreputable anti-Bolshevik rag. All the Right Independents at the Halle Congress were most anxious to make capital out of the question of "upper ranks and lower ranks," which has lately become the question of the day in our party. Martov brought to Halle the Moscow papers, with detailed reports of the discussions at our last All-Russian Party Conference, and articles on this question. Hilferding's paper immediately republished this material, throwing out, of course, everything it deemed unsuitable, and distorting the real meaning. Dittmann "himself" undertook the task of "explaining" that material at public meetings. He quoted with great satisfaction and gusto the articles by Comrade Preobrajensky, published in "Pravda" on the eve of our last All-Russia Party Conference. Dittmann recited with even greater pleasure extracts from my report at our party conference, in which I spoke of some of the dark sides of our party life, and pointed out the prevailing inequalities, etc. Having embellished it all with his own eloquence, Dittmann concluded triumphantly: "Is it not clear to everyone that this means the utter failure of the Bolshevik Party, a complete failure of the idea of centralism?" I fully analysed this circumstance in my speech. Dittmann's game was soon turned against him. I acknowledged that their were some faults to be found in our party. We are suffering