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Twelve days in Germany
Image 33
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Zinovyev, Grigory Yevseyevich, 1883-1936. Twelve days in Germany - Image 33. 1921. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5950/show/5898.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Zinovyev, Grigory Yevseyevich, 1883-1936. (1921). Twelve days in Germany - Image 33. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5950/show/5898

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Zinovyev, Grigory Yevseyevich, 1883-1936, Twelve days in Germany - Image 33, 1921, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5950/show/5898.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Twelve days in Germany
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Zinovyev, Grigory Yevseyevich, 1883-1936
Publisher The Union Publishing Co.
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Glasgow, Scotland
Date 1921
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
  • Socialism
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Germany
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 77 pages; 19 cm
Original Item Location HX276.Z45 1921
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304528~S5
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Public Domain: This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 33
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_8512320_032.jpg
Transcript 31 Thla was said by people who acknowledge men like Dittmann, who made his name in bourgeois circles by his articles against Soviet JWussia as their chiefs. Whencn, then, such hypocrisy, whence such double-dealing? There is no doubt that all these Hilferdings, Crispiens, Ditt- manns and Co. hate the Bolsheviks from the bottom of their hearts, and secretly yearn (Kautsky did it openly—he wrote a number of times that, the Bolshevik regime would fall in a couple of months) for that happy moment when "Democracy" will destroy the Soviet Government in Russia. The thing is easily explained. The workers of Russia, by their great • struggle, have won the hearts of the workers of the world. The workers of all countries, including those of Germany, do not. allow anyone at their meetings to speak against Soviet Russia. The workers are firmly on our side. Whosoever wishes to win the least confidence from the German workers must at least pretend that he is a friend of Soviet Russia. Even the Scheidemannists pretend to be friends of Soviet Russia. The Right Independents, whose chief watchword is "keep your nose to the wind," had of course to pretend that they, in spite of everything, are in favour of Soviet Russia. But the Right Independents were, of course, unable to follow logically their line of conduct. Their outbursts against the "Moscow knout," their accusations against the Lefts at the preliminary discussions displayed the most outspoken jingoism directed precisely against Soviet Russia. The "Freiheit" tried its best to preserve the decorum of a paper friendly to Soviet Russia. But on Dittmann's arrival from Russia he commenced a series of articles against Soviet Russia. But. the "overwhelming" success, which he had in bourgeois and black-hundred circles, at once discredited him in the eyes of the workers. It became impossible for him to show himself at any workers' meeting. The "Freiheit' was boycotted by the working people. Hnder such circumstances the paper preferred to discontinue the proposed series, after printing two libellous articles. But in spite of the efforts of Hilferding, who as editor of the paper tried to restrain its tendencies, his grip on it became feebler and the paper became more and more anti-Bolshevik. During the congress the "Freiheit" pub-