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Twelve days in Germany
Image 22
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Zinovyev, Grigory Yevseyevich, 1883-1936. Twelve days in Germany - Image 22. 1921. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5950/show/5887.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Zinovyev, Grigory Yevseyevich, 1883-1936. (1921). Twelve days in Germany - Image 22. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5950/show/5887

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Zinovyev, Grigory Yevseyevich, 1883-1936, Twelve days in Germany - Image 22, 1921, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5950/show/5887.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Twelve days in Germany
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Zinovyev, Grigory Yevseyevich, 1883-1936
Publisher The Union Publishing Co.
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Glasgow, Scotland
Date 1921
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
  • Socialism
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Germany
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 77 pages; 19 cm
Original Item Location HX276.Z45 1921
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304528~S5
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Public Domain: This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 22
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_8512320_021.jpg
Transcript 20 prove a faithful henchman of the bourgeoisie, a furious watchdog of the middle class, just as Noske did. After Dissmann the most influential man in the Rights section is Dittman. He is a typical representative of that comparatively small but very noxious counter-revolutionary caste, the labour aristocracy. Marx, in his time, used to mock at some of the English representatives of this type, who valued an invitation to the Lord Mayor's banquet far more than the confidence shown to them by their own class. Dittmann tries to be just as "respectable" as the representatives of the "best" society. He possesses as "good manners" as any other member of the committee of the German Reichstag. He dresses as well as any "genuine" M.P. of the bourgeoisie, and prides himself, like most parvenues, on possessing "good manners," "refinement" and culture. He wants to prove that he does not come from the dregs of society, and is no way inferior to "real" gentlemen, and for that purpose he carries about with him the appurtenances of the dandy, a small mirror and a comb, to which he resorts upon every public appearance, so as not to show himself at a disadvantage. His path has been long and thorny. When young, he committed youthful "indiscretions" and at one time was regarded as belonging to the Lefts. I remember when I was at the party congress in Jena in 1910 the late Rosa Luxembourg first introduced Dittmann to me, stating that he was one of her pupils. It is true that Dittmann at that very same party congress twice betrayed his instructress. None the less at that time he was not averse to playing the part of "Left." So long as the old Social Democratic Party was united and strong, Dittmann was patiently working in its ranks, trusting to make a name for himself in the party by his persistent work. At the beginning of the Imperialist War Dittmann tamely voted for the war credits, and passed over to the Independents only when it became clear that the old Social Democracy was beginning to lose its supporters. Before the revolution Dittmann was imprisoned—at that time guilty and innocent were imprisoned in Germany. This circumstance enhanced his popularity among the workers. When the revolution came Dittmann was one of the first "Socialists" to scrape through into the