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Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925
Image 103
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Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 103. 1925. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 2, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5534.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1925). Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 103. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5534

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 103, 1925, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 2, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5534.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925
Contributor (Local)
  • British Women Trade Unionist Delegation
Publisher W. P. Coates
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London, England
Date 1925
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Labor unions
  • Women
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
  • Employment
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Extent xxi, 88 pages, 1 leaf including frontispiece, illustrations, portraits, facsimiles folded plates; 26 cm
Original Item Location DK265.B67385
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8302907~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 103
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_4447404_102.jpg
Transcript not active supporters of the Government, who would probably acquiesce in another form of government equally well, but what struck us was the way in which they took the Soviet Government for granted as their own stable Government. They criticised some of the activities of Soviet Government—but not nearly so vehemently as the Government of the day in England may be heard to be criticised any day. Nevertheless, a housewife, for instance, in one case, showing us her two children (very bonny ones, aged ten and two respectively, who did not look at all as though they had gone through the hard days of the wars, revolution, famine, and blockade) said : " Just look at his little limbs, don't imagine that our soviet children are starved or neglected ! " We also spoke to a number of private shopkeepers when they did not know who we were, to hairdressers, and private employers. Here it is quite true that in many cases they complained of various restrictions, more particularly of the restrictions imposed by the Government in the first years of the Revolution. For the most part, however, they also said that things were improving, and in any case there was no question of regarding the Soviet Government as anything but a permanency, They may not like it, but they certainly realise its strength—that is to say, the support it has from the masses, and they accept it with more acquiescence and far' less hope of overthrowing it than Socialists and supporters of the Labour Party in Great Britain accept the present Conservative Government. We admit that our report deals mainly with the best side of present- day life in Soviet Russia. We do not at all mean to deny that there is still much suffering, much poverty in the Soviet Union. We are perfectly well aware that the work still awaiting the Soviet Government inHhe spheres of education, of raising the general cultural level of the people of that vast country, as in agriculture, industry, housing, sanitation, health, is still enormous. If we have described and emphasised the good, it is for two reasons. In the first place, there are not lacking scribes in this and other countries who are continually, not merely painting the bad sides of present-day Soviet Russia, but exaggerating them out of all proportion. Secondly, and far more important, we have emphasised the good because the bad is entirely an inheritance of the past; the good is the work of the present and an earnest of the hope of the future. Although in this report we do not desire to discuss the question as to whether the soviet system is applicable or not to this or other- countries, we can say that in Russia, at any rate, it has lent itself to a far more genuine and widespread participation of the masses of the workers, and of those working peasants who take an interest in public affairs, in the actual machinery of every-day government, than is the case here at home. Moreover, it is the constant endeavour of the Soviet authorities, of the Russian Communist Party, and the Russian trade unions, to draw larger and larger sections of the toiling masses, urban and rural, men and women, to participate in the work of government. Whatever our abstract theoretical views may be of the soviet system of government, however we may differ from the Bolsheviks in points of detail, or even in general outlook as regards the position of affairs in our own country, no honest observer of present-day Soviet Russia can doubt for one moment that a great and sincere experiment in working-class government (87)