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Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925
Image 102
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Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 102. 1925. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 2, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5533.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1925). Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 102. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5533

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 102, 1925, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 2, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5533.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925
Contributor (Local)
  • British Women Trade Unionist Delegation
Publisher W. P. Coates
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London, England
Date 1925
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Labor unions
  • Women
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
  • Employment
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Extent xxi, 88 pages, 1 leaf including frontispiece, illustrations, portraits, facsimiles folded plates; 26 cm
Original Item Location DK265.B67385
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8302907~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 102
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_4447404_101.jpg
Transcript Chapter XIX CONCLUSION IN giving our report of what we saw and learned during our visit to Soviet Russia, we arc not at all concerned with the question as to the righteousness of the Bolsheviks, or as to their methods of establishing the soviet system. In investigating conditions in a foreign country we have to take institutions as we find them, and only two things concern us : firstly, is that system accepted by the majority of the people who live under it ? secondly, docs it on the whole work out for the benefit of the toiling masses of the country ? With Mr. Keynes we say quite frankly that we are definitely and all the time on the side of our own class, the exploited working class (including working peasants and both brain and hand workers). As to the question of whether the Soviet Government is accepted by the people who live under it, we have no hesitation in giving a very emphatic " Yes." The vast majority of the town workers and the more educated of the peasantry in every part of the Soviet Union we visited, are enthusiastically in its favour ; they take a pride in its achievements, and feel that, so far from the Soviet Government being the dictatorship of a comparatively small party, it is the expression of their own dictatorship —the dictatorship of the workers and peasants. They look to the Russian Communist Party for leadership. They respect and love it as the party that has led them to success ; but State power, they feel, is actually under their own control, through their direct representatives on the Soviets, through their trade unions, their workshop committees, and so on. As regards the masses of the illiterate and backward peasantry, they give the Soviet Government at least their passive support. Their life is still very hard, but so it was formerly—who is to blame they do not know ; they do not understand the " high politics " of the townspeople— but most of them do know that they have more land now than formerly. Some of them do appreciate the fact that in time of drought and special hardships the State comes to their help far more frequently and readily than had ever been the case before. More and more of them are beginning to appreciate the efforts being made by the Government and town workers to spread education amongst theuTand to give them some of the benefits of modern science, or, as they say themselves, " some of the present-day wonders," such as electricity, agricultural machinery, aerial methods of pest destruction, and so on. There still remains the intelligentsia, or semi-intelligentsia, and the private employers and traders. The intelligentsia, in so far as they are represented by such classes as teachers, doctors, professors, and journalists, for the most part support the Government, either actively or at the very least passively. We met many of them in schools, hospitals, colleges, and privately, as our report shows. We met some people privately who are (86)