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Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925
Image 92
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Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 92. 1925. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 2, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5523.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1925). Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 92. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5523

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 92, 1925, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 2, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5523.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925
Contributor (Local)
  • British Women Trade Unionist Delegation
Publisher W. P. Coates
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London, England
Date 1925
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Labor unions
  • Women
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
  • Employment
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Extent xxi, 88 pages, 1 leaf including frontispiece, illustrations, portraits, facsimiles folded plates; 26 cm
Original Item Location DK265.B67385
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8302907~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 92
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_4447404_091.jpg
Transcript W. : " Before the war he used to earn twenty-eight roubles a month, and we had to pay five roubles for a house. Now he earns thirty-nine to forty-five roubles a month, and we have three rooms and a kitchen free of charge." D. : " But do you find the cost of living higher now ? " W. : " Not very much. It used to be very hard about two or three years ago, but now it is much more comfortable. Eight of my relatives were in the war, four of them were killed—two sons and two brothers. Two of my sons now attend the Rabfac, one is in the Red Army, and my youngest is at school ; he is ten years old." D. : " How is your boy treated in the Red Army ? " W. : " Very well indeed. If I am to believe his letters he seems to be having quite a good time there. Very different indeed from what my brothers used to say about the treatment in the army before and during the war. Many is the time I saw my poor mother cry when they came to take my brothers into the Tsarist army." D. : " And don't you cry when your sons have to join up now ? " W. : " Not at all. I was a little uneasy at first, but when he wrote home, and my husband spelt out the letter with the help of the schoolmaster (I can't read much myself, and my husband only learnt a short time ago) and he told us how they had proper bedding and bedclothes, and how friendly the officers were, and all about the lessons and lectures and concerts they were having, I felt quite cheerful. Besides a few months ago a friend of his returned home from the army, and said he looked awfully well. He says they get good and sufficient food, and of course drill in the open air." D. : " And do the other mothers of sons in the Red Army feel like you do ? " W. : " Certainly. We are none of us afraid of the Red Army. We are grateful to it for the way it protected us against foreign attacks ; and I am sure I won't mind Alyesha, my youngest boy, joining up when the time comes, although we all very much hope we shall never again be attacked, and so will not have to fight." D. : " And so, when the recruits are taken away, there are no crying women following them ? " W. : " Well, some of us may cry a little at parting, as we might if they went to live in another town, but their tears are not the tears of grief and despair shed by my mother when my brothers used to be called up ; of that I am sure." And the other women there corroborated what she said. Arotzindo Sanatorium at Abas-Tuman in Georgia While in Georgia we visited a sanatorium situated in most picturesque surroundings on the top of a hill above the village of Abas-Tuman. The sanatorium is situated on the site of a ruined village known as Arotzindo, ' meaning " Cannot climb up." It was constructed by the Soviet authorities about two years ago in accordance with the most modern principles of hygiene. At present it is a huge red building situated in ideal conditions, but the outer walls have been so constructed as to make it possible to add plaster decorations later, so as to beautify the external appearance of the building. All the rooms are sunny, lofty, and airy ; and the whole (76)