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Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925
Image 90
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Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 90. 1925. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 2, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5521.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1925). Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 90. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5521

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 90, 1925, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 2, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5521.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925
Contributor (Local)
  • British Women Trade Unionist Delegation
Publisher W. P. Coates
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London, England
Date 1925
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Labor unions
  • Women
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
  • Employment
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Extent xxi, 88 pages, 1 leaf including frontispiece, illustrations, portraits, facsimiles folded plates; 26 cm
Original Item Location DK265.B67385
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8302907~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 90
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_4447404_089.jpg
Transcript beautiful furniture, walls, pictures, and gardens with the utmost respect, and their sojourn here for about six weeks not only cured them physically, but it often also signified a liberal education. In many cases it was their first introduction to civilised life. They learnt here to some extent what comforts modern civilisation could provide, how much their lives had differed therefrom, and what the Soviet Government was restoring to them. The other houses on the Livadia estate are also being transformed into sanatoria for town workers and peasants. The Brobov Sanatorium for Children This sanatorium was founded about twenty years ago by Professor Bobrov, and is still largely staffed, so far as doctors and higher personnel generally is concerned, by the old staff. When we visited the sanatorium there were 110 children, their ages ranging from two and a-half to twelve. In the following month (June) the numbers were to have been increased to 160. Most of the children suffer from bone tuberculosis, and the doctor in charge showed us some wonderful cures of children whose limbs had been bent and who had been unable to walk, now looking very fit, and practically cured. Most of the children are of working-class parentage, and all these are treated free of charge. A small number are the children of well-paid workers, and these pay about 146 roubles per month, a smaller number still belong to wealthy private merchants, employers of labour, &c, and these pay 200 to 300 roubles per month. The home is at present dependent on the trade unions and similar organisations for funds, but the doctor told us that from next October he hoped the sanatorium would be taken over by the State. He said he would very much welcome this, as it would free them from financial worry. We particularly questioned both the doctor and others of the higher officials who had worked here from the foundation of the sanatorium, how they found conditions of work since the revolution. They told us they had passed through some very difficult times, but that conditions now were considerably better. We then asked them the plain question : " Do you consider that the Soviet Government helps or in any way hinders your work ? " to which they replied without hesitation, " Undoubtedly the Government helps us all it can." To the question whether any of them would welcome the return of the Tsarist Government, they gave an emphatic " No," and said further that, with the possible exception of an individual here and there, nobody in Russia dreams of any such thing. To the further question whether there were many who might welcome the return of the Mensheviks they replied : " There were probably more who might do so, but there is no likelihood of their return either." We had a very well-served and well-cooked dinner at this place, and both during and after dinner some more teachers, also the nursemaids and domestic and kitchen staff came in, to have a talk and to welcome us. We questioned these workers, particularly the domestic and kitchen workers very closely, on the conditions now and before the Soviet Revolution. Those of them who had been domestics before the revolution told us that conditions now for domestic servants^Jwere incomparably better than before the revolution. Like all other workers, they have an eight-hour day : formerly they worked all hours. Their food and lodging (74)