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Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925
Image 88
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Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 88. 1925. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 2, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5519.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1925). Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 88. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5519

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 88, 1925, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 2, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5519.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925
Contributor (Local)
  • British Women Trade Unionist Delegation
Publisher W. P. Coates
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London, England
Date 1925
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Labor unions
  • Women
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
  • Employment
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Extent xxi, 88 pages, 1 leaf including frontispiece, illustrations, portraits, facsimiles folded plates; 26 cm
Original Item Location DK265.B67385
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8302907~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 88
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_4447404_087.jpg
Transcript the Soviet Government really means. They only know that life is hard, and they grumble ; but in most cases if you suggest the return of the Tsarist Government and the landowners, they are terrified, and say they won't allow that on any account." D. : " Do the peasants of your village take part in the elections to the Soviets ? " P. : " Oh, yes, though not all." (And further questions on this point elicited that the number taking part varied in the various villages—from all over the U.S.S.R.—represented here, from 35 per cent, to 85 per cent of the voters.) D. : " What about the women peasants. Do they take an active part in the work of the local Soviets ? " The answers again varied. In some cases a large proportion do ; in other cases very few. In most cases the men peasants would seem to resist the participation of women in public life ; but a few tales were told us here of how the women insisted on having their representatives elected, and made it generally very unpleasant for the men until the latter gave in. In some of these cases the men afterwards owned that the " Petticoats were not doing badly." When walking round the grounds and down to the beach we came across a " peasant correspondent." There are now a fair number of such correspondents, he told us. Their special duty was to furnish the town papers with information regarding the activities of their village. They do this in their spare time, and as very often they give information of the misdoings of Kulaks (peasant profiteers) they not infrequently have very unpleasant times. The Kulaks take every measure to rid themselves of the watchful eye of these correspondents, not shrinking even from murder, and this is the real cause underlying the cases of murders of village correspondents published by the papers from time to time. The general population of the villages, the poorer and even middle peasantry, are not hostile, and will even often go to the correspondent to tell him of some grievance either against a richer peasant, a dishonest official, or some unjust judgment of a local soviet department. " Not a few wrongs have thus been righted," added the correspondent, proudly. This same correspondent introduced us to another young fellow, also a village correspondent, who until now had been working on the land, but as his correspondence had shown conspicuous journalistic ability, he had been granted a State scholarship in an institute for journalism, attendance at which he would start next term. We may make a digression here and say that we spoke to a number of journalists in various parts of the country about these workers and village correspondents, and in general we can say that whilst most of the Communist journalists were very sympathetic towards this new movement of workers and peasants' correspondents, the non-party journalists were rather sceptical and ran them down as mere amateurs and of very little use. We also had interviews with the doctors and nurses, who told us that the peasants were, for the most part, excellent patients. They responded to the treatment, as a rule, much more rapidly than town workers, their constitutions being much stronger. It was surprising, they also said, how rapidly the peasants learnt to be clean and orderly. They treated the (72)