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Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925
Image 86
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Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 86. 1925. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 2, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5517.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1925). Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 86. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5517

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 86, 1925, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 2, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5517.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925
Contributor (Local)
  • British Women Trade Unionist Delegation
Publisher W. P. Coates
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London, England
Date 1925
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Labor unions
  • Women
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
  • Employment
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Extent xxi, 88 pages, 1 leaf including frontispiece, illustrations, portraits, facsimiles folded plates; 26 cm
Original Item Location DK265.B67385
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8302907~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 86
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_4447404_085.jpg
Transcript Chapter XVII HEALTH INSTITUTIONS OR SANATORIA SANATORIA in the U.S.S.R. arc not merely for tubercular patients, they also treat various other diseases in their very first stages, as well as cases of ordinary debility or overstrain, and cases which show a tendency towards the development of tuberculosis or other disease suitable for sanatorium treatment. We describe below only a few of the numerous sanatoria we visited all over the U.S.S.R. The Livadia Peasants' Sanatorium The Livadia was formerly the Tsarist Crimean estate. The estate itself covers nearly 950 acres. The park alone extends over about 352 acres, and contains numerous fine trees, the whole of the world having been scoured for the finest specimens when the park was planted. There are gardens extending over nearly nineteen acres, magnificent vineries, &c. The cut roadways cover over twenty-six miles. The estate contains 400 structures, 110 of which are dwelling-houses. The most imposing structure is, of course, the Big Palace, the construction of which alone cost two and a half million roubles (over £250,000), a three-storied building containing 125 beautiful rooms. This was the seaside residence of the Tsar and Tsaritsa and their children. The riches formerly contained in this palace are almost fabulous. Then there is the Small Palace, in which Alexander III had lived and died, and which had not been used since his death. In addition, there are the very fine residences of the Tsarist retinue, the court ladies and gentlemen. One such house contains sixty-two rooms. And finally there are the small dwellings for the numerous servants who ministered to the comforts of all these parasites. There was also in Livadia a splendid motor garage, housing 100 ears and a large coachhouse for all the motors and carriages of the royal family and their retinue ; the latter, it is said, numbered about 1,000 people. Apart from the Tsar and his court and their servants, 3,000 soldiers and jxilice were stationed in and around Livadia, for the protection of the Tsar against the people. But even that was not sufficient. A special cavalry regiment was stationed as a reserve in Simferopol, and along the whole coast of the Crimea there was a network of secret police and spies, with headquarters at Yalta. Now, however, this is all changed. The Tsar, and his family,and the nobility have vanished, and the magnificent rooms and grounds, for so long their playground, now house honest sons and daughters of the soil—the Russian peasants—who come here to recover from disease. This year the Big Palace alone is housing 350 peasants ; next year it is hoped to have accommodation for 600. We visited Livadia on May 28. Although the sanatorium had not yet been formally opened, already a large number of peasants were there. It was a glorious day, and the gardens around the palace were in full (70)