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Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925
Image 85
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Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 85. 1925. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 2, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5516.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1925). Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 85. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5516

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 85, 1925, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 2, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5516.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925
Contributor (Local)
  • British Women Trade Unionist Delegation
Publisher W. P. Coates
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London, England
Date 1925
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Labor unions
  • Women
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
  • Employment
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Extent xxi, 88 pages, 1 leaf including frontispiece, illustrations, portraits, facsimiles folded plates; 26 cm
Original Item Location DK265.B67385
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8302907~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 85
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_4447404_084.jpg
Transcript on the banks of the Neva in Leningrad, in the famous health resorts of the Caucasus, in the Donetz Basin, and many other parts of the Soviet Union have been converted into delightful Rest Homes and Sanatoria for workers and peasants. While in the Crimea, we visited a very large number of these Homes and Sanatoria, we often partook of meals with the inmates and patients, and although the food was strange to us, and not always to our liking, it was fresh and plentiful, and eaten with evident relish by both the inmates and the Russian visitors, who accompanied us. We also had numerous talks with the doctors, nurses, patients or holiday makers, the directors of the Sanatoria and Rest Homes, and the kitchen and general domestic staffs Our general impression was that the number of such Rest Homes and Sanatoria was very great, but taking into account the enormous size of the U.S.S.R. they are still insufficient to meet the demand ; we learned that actually the Rest Homes could cope with about 25 per cent, of the requirements and that the Sanatoria, although the accommodation in them had increased during the last year by 150 per cent., could now cope with about 36 per cent of the demand. The director of the Yalta Sanatoria told us that it was the aim of the Government, the Health Commissariat and the Insurance department to bring the Sanatoria of the U.S.S.R. up to the very highest level of excellence, even before they increased their number to any great extent. In the Crimea, as in the Rest Homes and Sanatoria of other parts of the Union—and we visited a large number of such in the Caucasus, Georgia and other parts of the U.S.S.R.—the general rule is that 80 per cent, of the inmates are workers from the bench or peasants direct from the land, the rest being brain workers, including clerks, typists, &c. Both Rest Homes and Sanatoria are entirely free of charge, the stay in the former being generally for a period of two weeks and in the latter for six weeks with an extension when necessary, but only by decision of the medical commission. The ordinary food at the Sanatoria consists of the following :— 8.30 Breakfast—Eggs, butter, cheese, bread, &c. 12.0 Lunch—Fish or meat and vegetables, cocoa or kefir (a specially prepared kind of sour milk). 3.0 Dinner—Soup, fish or meat and vegetables, fruit. 7.0 Supper—Same kind of meal as lunch. 10.0 Milk and bread and butter. All patients receive at least three large tumblers of milk per day and about an ounce of butter. Patients who require it receive extra food. In general, the patients at the Sanatoria and holiday makers at Rest Homes seemed thoroughly satisfied with their conditions, and to be enjoying their stay there immensely. The only complaints we ever heard—and we often spoke to the patients and holiday makers privately, with no Soviet or Trade Union official within ear-shot—was that they did not always like the compulsory hour of rest after dinner, that they thought the time spent at the Sanatorium not long enough, and that not all their friends at their factory or workshops, who also needed a holiday or treatment, had been selected. (69)