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Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925
Image 84
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Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 84. 1925. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 2, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5515.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1925). Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 84. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5515

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 84, 1925, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 2, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5515.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925
Contributor (Local)
  • British Women Trade Unionist Delegation
Publisher W. P. Coates
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London, England
Date 1925
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Labor unions
  • Women
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
  • Employment
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Extent xxi, 88 pages, 1 leaf including frontispiece, illustrations, portraits, facsimiles folded plates; 26 cm
Original Item Location DK265.B67385
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8302907~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 84
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_4447404_083.jpg
Transcript their native Tartar tongue, and the notices on the walls, the inscriptions under pictures and so on, were in the Tartar language. The ages of the Children vary from seven to fifteen, they only live at the Home, and are educated at neighbouring schools. The question of whether the children in orphan homes should be taught at the Home or sent to outside schools in order not to be cut off from children of the outside world is being much debated by teachers in Russia. On the whole the latter view seems to prevail, although by no means universally. Most of the children are Young Pioneers, and there was the usual Lenin corner. Discipline here, as in all the schools and Homes we visited, is based exclusively on self-government. Later we visited the Regional Museum, where we noted some fine specimens of ancient relies of the Old and New Stone Age. There were also specimens of Grecian and Roman art and so on. Some of the rooms contained magnificient pictures and one room was devoted to relics of the civil war, including specimens of the papers, proclamations, appeals, &c, issued during that period. In the entrance court of the museum there were appeals to citizens to preserve old monuments, not to disfigure them and to notify the authorit its of the museum should they possess or come into possession of specimens of ancient art and other relics—in order that such may not be lost to ]x>sterity. Here, as in Moscow, Leningrad and every other part of the Union we visited, we found the greatest jxissible care taken of historical buildings, museums, pictures, and art treasures generally. We also visited a Tartar club, which seemed very well arranged, containing a library (exclusively Tartar), reading rooms, a Lenin room, and so on. In the evening there was a meeting, one of the most enthusiastic we had witnessed anywhere in the U.S.S.R. The hall was packed, but the streets were equally packed. One could literally have walked along the heads of the crowd in the streets around the hall. The enthusiasm and cheering for the British visitors was enormous, and we were told by a number of people that this demonstration was absolutely spontaneous. The local trade union officials had not been certain as to the day of our arrival, and they had convened the meeting on that same day. After having spent a day at Simferopol, we went to Yalta which we made our headquarters for a thorough investigation of the Crimean health resorts. Sanatoria and Rest Homes at Yalta and District Yalta and the district round about it was in pre-revolutionary days the exclusive preserves of the Tsar, his family, courtiers and nobility. None but these classes of the Russian population were allowed anywhere in the vicinity, excepting, of course, their servants, who had to furnish satisfactory evidence of their loyalty and trustworthiness (from the Tsarist point of view). Even the rich middle class and merchants were rarely allowed there except on business. The whole coast line from Alushta (half way between Simferopol and Yalta), as indeed other parts of the Crimea, is dotted with numerous fine villas and palaces, formerly belonging to the nobility, ministers of State and so on. Most of these villas, after being re-decorated and repaired have been converted into Rest Homes and Sanatoria. Similarly, private villas, summer residences, palaces and monasteries outside Moscow, (68)