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Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925
Image 81
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Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 81. 1925. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 2, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5512.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1925). Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 81. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5512

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 81, 1925, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 2, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5512.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925
Contributor (Local)
  • British Women Trade Unionist Delegation
Publisher W. P. Coates
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London, England
Date 1925
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Labor unions
  • Women
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
  • Employment
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Extent xxi, 88 pages, 1 leaf including frontispiece, illustrations, portraits, facsimiles folded plates; 26 cm
Original Item Location DK265.B67385
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8302907~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 81
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_4447404_080.jpg
Transcript plan of land settlement for the Jews, and we were informed that this experiment is proving very successful. When we were in Kislovodsk, we met a large number of Kerachais, both men and women. They came specially to see us in their picturesque national costumes. None of them hid their faces, but the older women, particularly in the remote places of Eastern Russia, do still wear veils. Some of them, though not all, could speak Russian, some spoke broken Russian, but one and all in course of conversation emphasised their satisfaction at their emancipation as a nation, and in the case of the women, as a sex. Many stories they told us of the oppression to which they had been formerly subjected by their Russian masters, and bytheir hirelings, the Cossacks. A native man, for instance was not allowed to marry a Russian girl, but the Russians claimed the right to carry off native girls. We asked them how their people felt generally now towards the Russians, and they told us that not quite all the accumulated hatred of past years had died down, but it was diminishing very steadily, as their people saw how their land was being restored to them, and that they now no longer had anything to fear from the Russians. On our way from Borzhom to Abas-Tuman (Georgia) we were met by a mixed crowd of Armenians, Mussulmans, Osetins, and Georgians, who were evidently on excellent terms with one another. We spoke to chance Osetins and other native carmen and peasants on the road. In some cases, they did not seem to understand much of what was going on—although even in such cases, to a straight question on the land, they always replied that they had more land now than they had ever had before the revolution. In other cases we found them very intelligent, keenly interested in home and even international affairs. They were invariably favourable, on the whole, to their local soviet institutions, and to the Soviet Government. They complained in some cases of dishonest or harsh officials, but they rarely blamed their Government for it. It was a relic of the past, they said, which would be stamped out in time. We had similar talks with Armenians, Tartars, and other nationalities. Had the Soviet Government done nothing else, the work they have done in restoring peace and harmony amongst the hostile nationalities of Russians, Jews, Georgians, Armenians, Osetins, Chechens, Kerachais and the host of other tribes inhabiting the Caucasus and the Transcaucasian Republic, would form a monument of lasting value. (65)