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Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925
Image 76
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Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 76. 1925. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 2, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5507.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1925). Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 76. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5507

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 76, 1925, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 2, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5507.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925
Contributor (Local)
  • British Women Trade Unionist Delegation
Publisher W. P. Coates
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London, England
Date 1925
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Labor unions
  • Women
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
  • Employment
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Extent xxi, 88 pages, 1 leaf including frontispiece, illustrations, portraits, facsimiles folded plates; 26 cm
Original Item Location DK265.B67385
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8302907~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 76
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_4447404_075.jpg
Transcript Chapter XIV CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE'S ORGANISATIONS HE " Young Pioneers " is an organisation for children of eleven to sixteen years of age, modelled on the British Scout movement HP insofar as it encourages all sortsof outdoor physical culture, cam]) -A- life, and social service, but it does not inculcate militarism and patriotism. On the contrary, the children are taught the international nature of the working-class movement. They are inspired with a love for international heroes of the working class and Socialist movement and they are taught to become fighters in the struggle for the emancipation of the working class. They are taught to hate and despise militarism and imperialism and the enslavement of one nation by another and to strive for international peace based on the self-determination of all nations great and small. They are taught the true dignity of labour when carried out for the common good, and they are instructed in the history of the working class and Socialist movement of all countries. They are taught to love the workers of all countries but to despise all those, both at home and abroad, who, though strong and healthy, live on the labour of others, and those who oppress others in any way. From the youngest to the oldest of them they are wonderfully intelligent. They take a keen interest in the affairs of both their own and other countries ; and when we watched them at their sports, demonstrations, study circles, or when singing revolutionary songs, with the real fervour of the pioneer and fighter who means what he says, we felt that these children would indeed be good custodians of the liberties won by their fathers and mothers at the cost of such heroic sacrifices. The children at the homes and schools are not, of course, compelled to belong to the Young Pioneers—but very large numbers of them do, and in all schools and children's homes there is invariably a branch of Young Pioneers and, among the older ones, of the Young Communists. For the very little ones there is an organisation known as the Octoberites (Novemberites according to the new calendar—but the November Revolution is still known as the " October " Revolution in Russia, as at that time Russia still used the old calendar). On January 1, 1925, there were 1,000,000 members in the Young Pioneer movement, 60 per cent, of whom were boys and 40 per cent, girls. Forty- live per cent, of the members were working-class children, 31 per cent, were children of peasants and 24 per cent, belonged to other classes. In the Young Communists League there were on January 1, 1925, 1,018,000 members and 120,000 candidates for membership or probationers, making the virtual membership 1,138,000. Of this number 84 per cent, were boys and 16 per cent, girls. Forty-three per cent, were of working-class parents, 45 per cent, from the peasantry, and 12 per cent, belonged to other social classes. Nine per cent, of the members were the children of members of the Communist Party, thus showing that the Young Communists are being recruited from non-party members as well as from party members. The following talk, one of many, we had with a Young Pioneer is characteristic. (60)