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Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925
Image 70
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Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 70. 1925. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 2, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5501.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1925). Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 70. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5501

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 70, 1925, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 2, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5501.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925
Contributor (Local)
  • British Women Trade Unionist Delegation
Publisher W. P. Coates
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London, England
Date 1925
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Labor unions
  • Women
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
  • Employment
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Extent xxi, 88 pages, 1 leaf including frontispiece, illustrations, portraits, facsimiles folded plates; 26 cm
Original Item Location DK265.B67385
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8302907~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 70
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_4447404_069.jpg
Transcript criminal children. The staff consists of doctors, teachers, and psychologists, who endeavour to establish the psychological and other peculiarities of each individual child with a view to determining the most suitable institution for each case. Special Commissions on Juveniles.—These consist of a president, a teacher, magistrate, and doctor for the determination of what course to adopt for educating the young criminal or defective. Specially trained teachers assist the commission. They investigate the conditions under which the crime was committed, and later visit the child's home, school, or place of work, and report to the commission the effects of the measures adopted for dealing with the young offender. Institute of Children's Inspectors.—Their duty is to keep watch on young persons at public places and to render assistance and protection to juveniles where necessary. Institutes or Homes for Defectives.—In the R.S.F.S.R. there are 155 schools for moral defectives, sixty schools for mental defectives, twenty-one schools for the blind, and forty-three schools for deaf and dumb children. Similar institutions exist in the other Republics. Factory Trade Schools One of the great needs of Soviet industry at the present moment is a larger number of skilled workers, particularly in the textile, metal, and printing trades. There are very few skilled workers unemployed ; on the contrary for the development and further progress of her industries —many of the most highly skilled of which were scarcely known in Russia before the revolution—an ever-growing number of highly skilled workers is essential. This was understood from the very beginning and factory workshop schools were opened in connection with a large number of important factories and enterprises. Lack of funds prevented their development to the desirable extent, but nevertheless they are already doing very good work in preparing fresh corps of skilled workers, who, at the same time, however, receive a general education during their period at the factory school. The age of the young people at these schools is from fourteen to eighteen. Children of fourteen to sixteen years of age attend the school for four hours and practice in the workshop for four hours, being paid for the work they perform. Young people from sixteen to eighteen years of age work six hours and are at school for two hours. As was to be expected from the more backward state of the women, the number of girls and young women at these schools is less than the number of boys and youths. Thus in the 251 factory schools of the R.S.F.S.R. furnishing returns in 1924, 16-5 per cent, of the pupils were girls. The number of the latter, however, is rising, thus of the number admitted at the end of 1924, 22 per cent, were girls. It was also noticed that the older the age of the pupils, the larger the number of boys, whereas in the younger groups the proportion of girls was greater, which again shows that the girls are being more and more drawn into these schools with the progress of time. The only factory schools in which the proportion of girl pupils is already greater than that of the boys are those of the garment workers. But even in the schools of such a trade as the metal workers, where naturally the (54)