Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925
Image 67
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 67. 1925. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 2, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5498.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1925). Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 67. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5498

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 67, 1925, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 2, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5498.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925
Contributor (Local)
  • British Women Trade Unionist Delegation
Publisher W. P. Coates
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London, England
Date 1925
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Labor unions
  • Women
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
  • Employment
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Extent xxi, 88 pages, 1 leaf including frontispiece, illustrations, portraits, facsimiles folded plates; 26 cm
Original Item Location DK265.B67385
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8302907~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 67
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_4447404_066.jpg
Transcript \ efforts of this body a kitchen was set up and a hot lunch provided for the children. This costs ten kopecks, but those children whose parents cannot afford this are granted the lunch free of charge. The majority of the children use the school dining room for this purpose. (10 kopecks = 2|d.) The children are all medically examined twice a year. There is a well-equipped hospital on the school premises, containing also a dental section, where children receive treatment immediately they require it. We visited the schoolrooms and looked over the exercise books of the various scholars. The results, in most cases, seemed exceedingly good, as did the samples of their work on the walls. When we visited the school the children were busy preparing for their annual exhibition, and we saw some wonderfully well-constructed models of machinery in metal factories. We also saw descriptions of how various metals are obtained, illustrated with drawings and specimens of the products in various stages of manufacture. There were plans and models of factories, and so on. The children themselves took a great pride in showing their preparations, explaining how they had obtained specimens during their visit to metal factories, and in return asked us many intelligent questions about the life and schools of British children, what sort of Young Pioneer movement there was in England, how many Young Communists there were, whether there were young labour organisations, and so on. The school is provided with workshops and a museum, a large number of the specimens in which were collected by the children themselves. The number of children per class is from thirty to thirty-five. The whole of the children are also divided into thirty groups for purposes of visits to works, and each group visits ten factories per year. We were particularly struck both at this school, as at other schools we visited, with the friendly and natural relations between the principal, the teachers, and the children. At this school we also saw what we had hitherto only noted at some of the children's homes, namely, out-of-door classes. The school has a garden attached and sufficient tables and benches are permanently fixed for accommodating the whole school in fine weather. About 70 per cent, of the children at this school, we were informed by the principal, belonged to the Young Pioneers. We were also informed that 92 per cent, of the children in Kharkov were at school this year, and it was hoped to provide accommodation for the whole 100 per cent, next year. On being told that education was compulsory, we asked what penalties were inflicted on parents who refused to send their children to school, to which the reply was they had never met with such a case. The parents were only too anxious for their children to attend school. In general, it will not be very long before at least elementary education is universal in the Ukraine. The following table shows the increase in the total number of children's educational establishments in the various Republics of the Soviet Union between January, 1923, and January, 1924. Since then there has been a very considerable increase in both educational establishments and pupils, but we were unable to obtain the necessary statistical data before leaving Russia. (51)