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Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925
Image 65
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Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 65. 1925. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 2, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5496.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1925). Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 65. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5496

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 65, 1925, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 2, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5496.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925
Contributor (Local)
  • British Women Trade Unionist Delegation
Publisher W. P. Coates
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London, England
Date 1925
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Labor unions
  • Women
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
  • Employment
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Extent xxi, 88 pages, 1 leaf including frontispiece, illustrations, portraits, facsimiles folded plates; 26 cm
Original Item Location DK265.B67385
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8302907~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 65
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_4447404_064.jpg
Transcript \ The Kindergarten of the " Red October " Confectionery Works By way of illustration, we may describe the kindergarten attached to the " Red October " Confectionery Works (Moscow) which is fairly typical of the other kindergartens of the Soviet Union. When we approached the kindergarten, the first thing that struck us was a notice, stating the day of the week and time mothers were expected to come for consultation with teachers and nurses regarding their children. Here, as in other kindergartens and in all creches, before entering the rooms used by the children we had to put on white overalls. The rooms used as play, work, and bed rooms (the children who are all under seven have a sleep during the day in separate beds reserved for each child) were bright sunny rooms decorated with pictures of revolutionary leaders and the children's own work, including drawings illustrating how they had spent May Day, little written exercises, clay models of animals, houses and other objects. The darker rooms of the house (which formerly belonged to the owner of the factory) are used as cloak rooms, for storing purposes, and so on. The work, considering the age of the children, was very good. The older children gave us exhibitions of their singing, marching, games and so on, which if not so elaborate as that done in the kindergartens here, was yet very pretty and instructive. The children have their little chairs and tables, but generally, the equipment here as in most other kindergartens was poorer than they are in the good kindergartens of England (which, however, are not usually for the workers' children). The Montessori method is usually the one adopted. In this particular Kindergarten, there is accommodation for eighty children, and only two were the children of parents who were members of the Communist Party. The question of what party its mother belongs to does not enter into the question of the admission of a child. They select those children whose parents are least likely to be able to afford to look after them properly and whose mothers go out to work. With regard to the payment of fees, in cases where necessary there is no charge, but most of the mothers, in order that their children may have better food than could be supplied otherwise, pay a voluntary contribution of two roubles per month. Children receive three meals per day. The Single Labour Schools For children of school age, there are what are known as the Single Labour Schools, in which it is hoped to provide sufficient accommodation for all children of school age by 1933. These schools are open for about ten months of the year and are divided into elementary and secondary schools, the former being attended by children of, roughly, from eight to eleven years of age and the latter by those of from twelve to seventeen years of age. Co-education is universal not only in these schools but in all educational establishments of the Soviet Union. The education in these schools is closely related to their surroundings and is based on the natural activities and self-reliance of the pupils. Discipline is based almost entirely on self-government or what might be called the public opinion of the children themselves. This assumes very (49)