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Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925
Image 63
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Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 63. 1925. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 2, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5494.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1925). Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 63. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5494

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 63, 1925, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 2, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5494.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925
Contributor (Local)
  • British Women Trade Unionist Delegation
Publisher W. P. Coates
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London, England
Date 1925
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Labor unions
  • Women
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
  • Employment
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Extent xxi, 88 pages, 1 leaf including frontispiece, illustrations, portraits, facsimiles folded plates; 26 cm
Original Item Location DK265.B67385
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8302907~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 63
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_4447404_062.jpg
Transcript \ responsible for the support of the child, and, according to a new clause, the individual amongst them who is considered best able to support and bring up the child is to be recognised as the legal father of it. Mutual Rights and Duties of Parents and Children The support of children by parents (whether married or unmarried) is compulsory, and the neglect of a child either by the mother or father, or its ill-treatment, is recognised and punished as a criminal offence. Similarly, children capable of doing so are legally liable to support their parents when the latter are ill, incapacitated, or unemployed. As both father and mother have equal duties towards the children, so they also have equal rights. Thus children of married parents take the common married name agreed on by the parents ; children of unmarried parents take the name either of the father or mother, in accordance with the agreement of the parents ; if the latter cannot agree, then a court of law decides, whether the child shall bear the father's or the mother's name. The same rule holds in the case of divorce. As regards religion, although the Soviet Government is frankly against the fostering of religious beliefs in the population, it nevertheless gives the right to every individual to follow the dictates of his own conscience, trusting to the spread of education to dispel the religious beliefs of the people. Under such circumstances it is scarcely necessary to say that no particular religion or sect holds a privileged position as against any other. The Church is completely separated from the State, and religion is considered the purely private matter of the individual. The religious upbringing of the children is left to the parents. If the latter agree on the religion of their child (and make a written statement to that effect), then the child is regarded as belonging to that Church or religion, but where the parents cannot, or do not agree as to the religion of their child, then the latter is regarded as belonging to no Church or religion until the age of fourteen, when the child is free to choose which Church, if any, it desires to join. According to a new clause in the code of laws on the family, all children are to be regarded as belonging to no religion until they themselves have reached the age of discretion, and can choose themselves which Church, if any, they care to join. Citizenship When only one parent is a citizen of the U.S.S.R. and the other is a citizen of another country, the parents are empowered to decide to which country their children should belong. Such an agreement must be drawn up in writing when registering their marriage. When, however, there is no such agreement, then the children born in the U.S.S.R. are regarded as citizens of the latter until the age of eighteen, after which they can themselves choose of which country they desire to become citizens. (47)