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Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925
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Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 59. 1925. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 2, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5490.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1925). Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 59. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5490

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 59, 1925, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 2, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5490.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925
Contributor (Local)
  • British Women Trade Unionist Delegation
Publisher W. P. Coates
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London, England
Date 1925
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Labor unions
  • Women
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
  • Employment
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Extent xxi, 88 pages, 1 leaf including frontispiece, illustrations, portraits, facsimiles folded plates; 26 cm
Original Item Location DK265.B67385
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8302907~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 59
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_4447404_058.jpg
Transcript Chapter XII THE FAMILY IN SOVIET RUSSIA MUCH has been written and said about the destruction of family life in the Soviet Union, with the implication that this has led, and is leading, to immoral relations between the sexes, polygamy, and so on. The truth, however, is that there is at least no more immorality in the U.S.S.R. to-day than exists in other countries, and certainly so far as we could judge, there is less immorality there now than there was in pre-revolutionary days. All the talk about the destruction of family life and its implications are based on the fact that the Soviet authorities, as well as the most progressively minded women in the Soviet Union, desire the more active and intelligent participation of women in public, trade union, political, and international affairs. To attain this, they affirm, as already pointed out in the chapter " Women in Industry," it is essential to free woman from her age-long domestic drudgery—from the constant tyranny of her pots and pans and wash tubs. For this purpose, the authorities encourage in every possible way the establishment of common dining rooms attached to factories and institutions, and by the co-operatives. A special society was formed for this purpose a few years ago, the " Narpit," which is a co-operative society for organising popular public dining rooms. In these dining rooms one can get an excellent meal for about forty kopecks and a more simple one much cheaper. The delegation visited a number of them, in various towns of the U.S.S.R., partaking of the meals provided. These dining rooms are invariably light, airy, and clean, although furnished very simply, and even barely. They cannot, for instance, always afford tablecloths, and use instead white oilcloths on the tables. But the Narpit does not aim only at providing cheap meals, it also aims at educating the diners, and the walls of every dining room are decorated with pictures, portraits of revolutionary leaders, and above all with posters and slogans illustrating the only way of making it possible for woman to break the chains of her economic and intellectual enslavement, namely, by freeing her from her domestic drudgery. The legends here, as in all the workers' clubs we visited, insist on the need for the emancipation of women and her entry into public life as part and parcel, as the essential corollary of the emancipation of the working class as a whole. In addition, there are often attached to such dining rooms, reading rooms, with many papers and journals, and occasionally also libraries. In such cases a woman is in attendance to give advice on reading matter and so on. Here a man may come with his wife and family and have meals under better conditions, better cooked, and cheaper than it could possibly be done at home. It may be stated here in passing that the Narpit has already opened thirty-six such dining rooms in Leningrad, capable of providing meals for 36,500 people ; thirty-three dining rooms in Moscow for 29,800 people, (43) d