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Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925
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Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 54. 1925. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 2, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5485.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1925). Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 54. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5485

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 54, 1925, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 2, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5485.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925
Contributor (Local)
  • British Women Trade Unionist Delegation
Publisher W. P. Coates
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London, England
Date 1925
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Labor unions
  • Women
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
  • Employment
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Extent xxi, 88 pages, 1 leaf including frontispiece, illustrations, portraits, facsimiles folded plates; 26 cm
Original Item Location DK265.B67385
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8302907~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 54
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_4447404_053.jpg
Transcript Chapter XI THE PEASANT WOMEN ONLY those who know something of the former complete enslavement, illiteracy, and general ignorance of the peasant women in Tsarist Russia can appreciate the change that has been brought about in the conditions of life and outlook of the peasant women of to-day. In pre-Revolution days she was a twofold slave. She was the slave of the landowner in the same way as were her husband, father, sons, and brothers, but at the same time she was also the slave, the chattel of her menfolk. The country woman had absolutely no rights—political, economic, or even human. Many were the stories we heard from the lips of peasant women, or women who now work in factories but who were of peasant origin, of the arbitrary conduct towards them of their fathers and husbands. Many of them had been forced, at the age of about sixteen, to marry a man they scarcely knew, being soundly thrashed by their fathers when they dared offer resistance. Justice forces us to say that in a number of cases such marriages turned out quite successful, and we met a number of such couples who were still living together happily, having fallen in love with one another after marriage. In other cases, of course, such marriages have led to much unhappiness. Now all this is changed. The marriage laws described below of course apply equally in the countryside and in the towns. But in other respects, too, the peasant woman has been given equality of opportunity. Thus a woman may now work the land on her own behalf, she may be a member of any agricultural or land society, of any co-operative society, artel, or commune ; she is empowered and encouraged to take part in the village meetings and in soviet (council) elections, both as voter and candidate. The woman has an equal right to the harvest and property of the farm, of which she is always an equal member, and of which she may be, if elected, the director or representative. By no means all peasant women in the U.S.S.R. are as yet acquainted with their present political and economic rights; a still larger number fail to utilise these rights by force of habit or ignorance. During our journey across many parts of the Soviet Union we took the opportunity, wherever possible, to question peasant women, not only as to their present material conditions, but also as to how far they knew and took advantage of the rights conferred on them by the Soviet Government. We found many who had but the haziest idea of what these rights were and what benefits they conferred on them. In some of these cases we found that, just as here at home, the menfolk were largely to blame. Some of these men knew the laws well enough, were even themselves more or less active workers in the local Soviets, co-operatives, or trade unions, but would not take the trouble to enlighten their more backward sisters, mothers and wives. Such an attitude on the part of the men was met with far more frequently in out-of-the-way country places than in the towns. ( 38 )