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Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925
Image 34
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Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 34. 1925. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 2, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5465.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1925). Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 34. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5465

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 34, 1925, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 2, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5465.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925
Contributor (Local)
  • British Women Trade Unionist Delegation
Publisher W. P. Coates
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London, England
Date 1925
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Labor unions
  • Women
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
  • Employment
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Extent xxi, 88 pages, 1 leaf including frontispiece, illustrations, portraits, facsimiles folded plates; 26 cm
Original Item Location DK265.B67385
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8302907~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 34
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_4447404_033.jpg
Transcript Chapter V VISITS TO GARMENT FACTORIES GARMENT-MAKING on modern lines, that is to say, the making of garments on the mass production system in large factories, is a comparatively new industry in Russia. Prior to 1920 clothing generally was made in small workshops and dressmaking establishments, or in the homes. Factory-made garments were imported mostly from Germany. The factories visited were very light and spacious, and compare very favourably with similar ones in this country. The most noticeable feature in regard to them is the up-to-date machinery and equipment. This is attributable to arrangement between the Russian Garment Makers' Trade Union and the Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America, who keep them, as far as circumstances will permit, supplied with new machinery, &c. The factories are run mainly on American lines, the system having been introduced first in Moscow by a group of enthusiastic workers who went over from America in 1920, taking with them a considerable quantity of up-to-date machinery. One factory we visited opened with 120 workers, and now employs over 1,000. It is still known as the American Factory No. 36. Our visit to this factory was extremely interesting, as one could converse quite freely with a large number of the workers without the aid of an interpreter. One worker in conversation said, speaking of conditions, that the difference between 1920 and to-day was like daylight following darkness. In all the factories visited there was a general atmosphere of activity, and all were working at full pressure. In many factories plans were being made to extend, as the present total output is unable to meet the demand for clothing of all descriptions. The standard of work in both the shirt, light clothing, and tailoring factories is excellent. Garment pressing is considered an injurious occupation, and as such the worker is entitled to four weeks' holiday with full pay each year. The pressing rooms are compelled (by law) to have special ventilators to take away the fumes that arise and to purify the air. In the larger factories visited provision is made for the medical care of the worker. For instance, fully qualified doctors and nurses are attached to the factory. Each factory has also a dentist with all the necessary equipment. In this connection it should be clearly understood that the medical and dental services are at the disposal of the workers entirely free of charge. We also found the principle of equal pay for equal work an established fact. In every case where we questioned the men and women engaged on similar work, we received the same reply, no difference in the wage paid. During our -visit to the nurseries and kindergartens attached to the factories we could not help thinking, when looking at the bright faces of the little ones, how much better cared for are the children in Russia to-day than the children of the majority of the working ( 18) .