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Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925
Image 31
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Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 31. 1925. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5462.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1925). Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 31. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5462

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 31, 1925, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5462.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925
Contributor (Local)
  • British Women Trade Unionist Delegation
Publisher W. P. Coates
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London, England
Date 1925
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Labor unions
  • Women
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
  • Employment
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Extent xxi, 88 pages, 1 leaf including frontispiece, illustrations, portraits, facsimiles folded plates; 26 cm
Original Item Location DK265.B67385
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8302907~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 31
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_4447404_030.jpg
Transcript i In all cases we found that the first consideration was the health and comfort of the worker. The rooms were well lighted. In one instance, where looms stood in the centre of a room (not a shed) electric lights were hung low, so that each weaver could see very well to draw her ends. The work, on the whole, seemed very good. In several mills a cloakroom for the workers' outdoor clothes was provided, but in one or twro cases their clothes were hanging in the workroom. The apprentice system in the cotton trade is very well organised. Although these boys and girls do not finally enter the mill until they are eighteen years, we were informed that they made very good workpeople. From figures given to us, we saw that output was steadily increasing. Some of the mills were working on a two-shift system, and in one case they were preparing to introduce a three-shift system. Although this is being done, there is still a shortage of cotton goods, and money is being laid aside to start new mills. We were informed that, these constructions would be started shortly, that British machinery was preferred, and that if at all possible the orders for new equipment and machinery would be placed in Britain. We noticed that most of the machines used at present were of British make. In many cases we were told of long hours and low wages before the Revolution, and in one case we were told of workpeople who lived inside the mill; now they all live outside the mill. The mills often have dispensaries, where the workers not only get what they need, but a qualified nurse is in attendance to give advice. In all the textile factories we visited women were taking an active part on all the Workshop Committees ; for instance, at one mill we found that on the Welfare Committee there were three men and twelve women, and the chairman was a woman ; on the Physical Culture Committee there were eight women and one man ; on the Education Committee there were six women and one man ; 126 trade union delegates were women, and twelve men. The Trekhgornaya Factory (in the Krassno-Presensk district of Moscow) Our visit to the Trekhgornaya factory took place a day earlier than they had actually expected us, and it also happened at a moment least favourable to the authorities, as we learnt afterwards from our conversation with some of the workers. This mill has 7,500 workpeople, and is, we were told, of historical importance : after the first revolution of 1905, when the people were fighting for better conditions of employment and advances in wages, the leaders of the movement were shot down, and fourteen were killed. In one of the meeting rooms adjoining the mill there is a tablet to their memory, and it was observed that their ages ranged from eighteen to twenty-eight years. We went through the raw material rooms, and the card room, ring spinning room, winding rooms, weaving rooms, bleaching rooms, printing rooms and flannelette-raising rooms. Every process is gone through at this mill, right from the raw materials to the finished article ready for the (15)