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Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925
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Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 30. 1925. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 2, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5461.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1925). Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 30. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5461

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 30, 1925, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 2, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5461.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925
Contributor (Local)
  • British Women Trade Unionist Delegation
Publisher W. P. Coates
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London, England
Date 1925
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Labor unions
  • Women
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
  • Employment
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Extent xxi, 88 pages, 1 leaf including frontispiece, illustrations, portraits, facsimiles folded plates; 26 cm
Original Item Location DK265.B67385
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8302907~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 30
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_4447404_029.jpg
Transcript Chapter IV THE TEXTILE INDUSTRY THE cotton industry of Russia seems to be run on a somewhat different plan from our own. First of all the Mills are often much larger, and bleaching, dyeing, printing and raising are for the most part conducted on the same premises, thus saving a good deal of transport. There is no separate union for different classes of operatives—all are members of the Textile Union. Their wages are fixed in categories, and are uniform, just as ours are. The division of work between men and women is different. In the card room, women do what is known as card room jobbing, or stripping and grinding. In our country this work is done by men. Then, again, each woman in the factories we visited had only one frame; we have two, with a girl back tenter, for four frames, or two, as the case may be. Ring Spinning.—This is carried on much like our own with the exception of doffing. Girls who are apprentices do this work. Five girls do the doffing for every fifteen frames, or according to the counts, but we saw no small boys doing this work, as is the case in our mills. Mule Spinning.—Although women can enter this occupation, very few seem to do so. They were very well staffed. Their system of wages differs from ours. In the first place everyone is on piece work. In our country only the spinner is on piece work, the others have standing wages. In the winding and beaming, the winders do not have so many ends as we have, moreover there is only one beaming mill to each person. The general rule in England is three for two persons. Twisting and drawing was in most cases done by women. Ours in most cases is done by men. Weaving.—In the weaving departments the looms did not run so quickly as in England; also two looms was the rule, whereas three is the rule here, and in many cases four looms. In the bleaching and flannelette raising, a good many women were employed. We saw a few automatic looms ; in these cases every weaver had six looms, and we found that their earnings were 50 per cent, above the average of other weavers. In dyeing and printing most of the workers wrere men. The machinery in some cases was very good, and in others out of date. In one case we found a shortage of strapping. Apart from this, however, the general organisation was very good. The guarding of machinery in some eases was more advanced than in England, for the end of the loom was guarded so that the picker could not hit anyone in passing. Straps running along the ceiling also had a guard the whole length of the strap. The ventilation in some mills was very good, in others not so good, although humidifiers were working almost everywhere. In one case the exhaust pipes were there ready to be fitted, in another case a sum of money had been laid aside for this purpose, and they were to be installed shortly. (14) fi|^^M